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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 10, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 565 total hits in 251 results.

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Gen Winder (search for this): article 7
Prison Items. --On Saturday, Henry S. Mumford, of Baltimore, was committed to the military prison of the Eastern district, by order of Gen. Winder, as a suspicious character. George Simmons, 1st Delaware Reg't, co G, a Yankee deserter; Wm. Shafer of the Caskie Rangers, a deserter, and J. F. Kirby, a supposed spy, were also put in the same prison. Thomas Bradford, arrested for trial before Court-Martial for selling liquor, was paroled for his appearance.
Gen Winder (search for this): article 15
dictment for misdemeanor. Miller had caused the arrest of Liggon on the charge of stealing his horse, and the act of violence complained of preceded it. Liggon was acquitted of the charge by the Mayor. Mike Roach, charged with getting drunk and trespassing on the Columbian Hotel, gave security for his good behavior, and was discharged. John W. Hutchinson, Captain in the 59th Georgia regiment, arrested for getting drunk and acting disorderly at the Exchange Hotel, was sent before Gen Winder. Dick, slave of Juan Plumni, found with a lot of flour and lard, supposed stolen, was ordered 25 stripes. Wm. Wiley was sent before the Hustings Court for examination on the charge of stealing a pair of shoes worth $20 from M. G. Gorden & Co. The shoes were taken Saturday morning. Wiley, a half grown lad, said he was born in Jackson, Miss., and raised in Louisiana. Martin O'Brien, Pat Doyle, and Edward Hall, arrested as vagrants, having no visible means of support gave bail,
William Wiley (search for this): article 15
in the 59th Georgia regiment, arrested for getting drunk and acting disorderly at the Exchange Hotel, was sent before Gen Winder. Dick, slave of Juan Plumni, found with a lot of flour and lard, supposed stolen, was ordered 25 stripes. Wm. Wiley was sent before the Hustings Court for examination on the charge of stealing a pair of shoes worth $20 from M. G. Gorden & Co. The shoes were taken Saturday morning. Wiley, a half grown lad, said he was born in Jackson, Miss., and raised in LouWiley, a half grown lad, said he was born in Jackson, Miss., and raised in Louisiana. Martin O'Brien, Pat Doyle, and Edward Hall, arrested as vagrants, having no visible means of support gave bail, and were released from jail. Hustings Court, Saturday, Nov. 8.--A special session of the Alderman's Court of Hustings con- vened to day for the examination of several cases of felony sent up from the Mayor. There were present Recorder Caskie, and Aldermen Bray, Anderson, Timberlake Lipscomb and Clopton. James Jone was examined for stealing James G. Hawthorn's
Wheatland (search for this): article 6
the existing troubles commenced. I have never doubted that my countrymen would yet do me justice. In my special message of the 8th of January, 1861, I presented a full and fair exposition of the alarming condition of the country, and urged Congress either to adopt measures of compromise, or, failing in this, to prepare for the last alternative. In both aspects my recommendation was disregarded. I shall close this document with a quotation of the last sentences of that message, as follows: "In conclusion, it will be permitted me to remark that I have often warned my countrymen of the dangers which now surround us. This may be the last time I shall refer to the subject officially. I feel that my duty has been faithfully, though it may be imperfectly, performed; and whatever the result may be, I shall carry to my grave the consciousness that I at least meant well for my country." Your obedient servant. James Buchanan. Wheatland, near Lancaster, Oct. 23, 1862.
Sent on --Thomas Curry, a youth about 17 years of age, charged with forging a pay roll, was examined before C. S. Com'r Watson, on Saturday, and sent on to the District Court for final trial.
Washington (search for this): article 6
adjacent batteries, but demanding its disavowal, and if this were not sent in a reasonable time he would consider it war, and fire on any vessel that attempted to leave the harbor. Two days after this occurrence, on the 11th of January, Governor Pickens had the audacity to demand of Major Anderson the surrender of the fort. In his answer of the same date the Major made the following proposition: "Should your Excellency deem fit, previous to a resort to arms, to refer this matter to Washington, it would afford me the sincerest pleasure to depute one of my officers to accompany any messenger you may deem proper to be the bearer of your demand." This proposition was promptly accepted by the Governor, and, in pursuance thereof, he sent on his part, Hon. J. W. Hayne, the Attorney General of South Carolina, to Washington, whilst Major Anderson deputed Lieut. Hall, of the United States army, to accompany him. These gentlemen arrived together in Washington on the evening of 13th o
John A. Warner (search for this): article 9
Brought to Richmond. --Seventy paroled Confederate soldiers, most of them disabled, arrived in Richmond from Atkins Landing yesterday. At that time there were three Yankee boats lying there, viz: John A. Warner, Express, and Hugh Hamilton.
d their destination in due time, and even expresses the extraordinary opinion that, with the possession of these forts, "the rebels might have purchased an early recognition." I shall next advert to the statement that the expedition under Captain Ward, "of three or four small steamers belonging to the coast survey," was kept back by something like a truce or armistice, [made here,] embracing Charleston and Pensacola harbors, agreed upon between the President and certain principal seceders onts thus provided for as sufficient. This was ready to sail for Fort Sumter on five hours notice. It is of this expedition that General Scott thus speaks: "At that time, when this (the truce) had passed away, Secretaries Holt and Toucey, Capt. Ward, of the navy, and myself, with the knowledge of the President, settled upon the employment, under the Captain, of three or four steamers belonging to the Coast Survey, but he was kept back by the truce." A strange inconsistency. The truce
Fire. --The alarm of fire given at 2" o'clock yesterday was caused by the burning partially, if not wholly, of three wooden tenements on 1st, near St. Peter's street, owned by Mr. Wm Wade, and occupied respectively by Wm. Ferguson, of the City Watch; S. P. Clopton, of New Kent, and John O'Brien. The fire originated in the tenement used by the last named as a grocery. He saved the greater portion of his stock. The occupants of the two other tenements also succeeded in rescuing their furniture. An adjoining house, occupied by Mrs. Mary Arnold, was also slightly damaged.
is duty. That body, however, throughout its entire session, declined to act on this nomination. Thus, without a collector, it was rendered impossible to collect the revenue. IV. General Scott's statements allege that "the Brooklyn, with Capt. Vodges's company alone, left the Chesapeake for Fort Pickens about January 22d, and on the 29th President Buchanan, having entered into a quasi armistice with certain leading Seceders at Pensacola and elsewhere, caused Secretaries Holt and Toucey to instruct, in a joint note, the commander of the war vessel off Pensacola, and Lieut, Siemmer, commanding Fort Pickens, to commit no act of hostility, and not to land Capt. Vodges's company unless the fort should be attacked" He afterwards states, within brackets, "That joint note I never saw, but suppose the armistice was consequent upon the meeting of the Peace Convention at Washington, and was understood to terminate with it." The statements betray a singular want of memory on the part o
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