hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Joseph R. Anderson 35 1 Browse Search
Scott 34 32 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
McClellan 12 0 Browse Search
Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
James Buchanan 10 0 Browse Search
Bennett 9 1 Browse Search
Holt 9 9 Browse Search
Virginia (Virginia, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 10, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 565 total hits in 251 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Washington (United States) (search for this): article 6
nion, "a smaller evil (than these intestine wars) would be to allow the fragments of the great Republic to form themselves into new Confederacies, probably four. " He then points out what ought to be the boundaries between the new Unions; and at the end of each, goes so far as even to indicate the cities which ought to be the capitals of the three first on this side of the Rocky Mountains to wit: "Columbia, South Carolina;" "Alton, or Quiney, III," and "Albany, New York," excluding Washington City altogether. This indication of capitals contained in the original, now in my possession, is curiously omitted in the version published in the National Intelligencer. He designates no capital for the fourth Union on the Pacific. The reader will judge what encouragement these views, proceeding from so distinguished a source, must have afforded to the Secessionists of the cotton States. I trust I have said enough, and more than enough, to convince every mind why I did not, with a fo
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 6
and McRae, in Pensacola harbor; Fort Pulaski. below Savannah; Forts Moultrie and Sumter, Charleston harbor, and Fort Monroe, in Virginia. These "views," both original and supplementary, were published by Gen. Scott in the National Intelligencerd military stores were dispatched by the Brooklyn to Fort Pickens without a moment's un- necessary delay. She left Fortress Monroe on the 24th of January. Well-founded apprehensions were, however, entertained at the time of her departure thatnication with Washington. The result was highly fortunate. The Brooklyn had a long passage. Although she left Fortress Monroe on the 24th of January, she did not arrive at Pensacola until the 5th of February. In the meantime Fort Pickens, wit they were in his possession. The Brooklyn, with troops, military stores, and provisions was to sail forthwith from Fortress Monroe to Fort Sumter. I am, therefore, utterly at a lose to imagine why the General, in his statement, should have assert
Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 6
s curiously omitted in the version published in the National Intelligencer. He designates no capital for the fourth Union on the Pacific. The reader will judge what encouragement these views, proceeding from so distinguished a source, must have afforded to the Secessionists of the cotton States. I trust I have said enough, and more than enough, to convince every mind why I did not, with a force of five companies, attempt to reinforce Forts Jackson and St. Philip, on the Mississippi, Fort Morgan, below Mobile; Forts Pickens and McRae, in Pensacola harbor; Fort Pulaski. below Savannah; Forts Moultrie and Sumter, Charleston harbor, and Fort Monroe, in Virginia. These "views," both original and supplementary, were published by Gen. Scott in the National Intelligencer, of January 18th, 1861, at the most important and critical period of the Administration.--Their publication at that time could do no possible good, and might do much harm. To have published them without the Presi
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
, in comparison with ours, sink into mere child's play." In the General's opinion, "a smaller evil (than these intestine wars) would be to allow the fragments of the great Republic to form themselves into new Confederacies, probably four. " He then points out what ought to be the boundaries between the new Unions; and at the end of each, goes so far as even to indicate the cities which ought to be the capitals of the three first on this side of the Rocky Mountains to wit: "Columbia, South Carolina;" "Alton, or Quiney, III," and "Albany, New York," excluding Washington City altogether. This indication of capitals contained in the original, now in my possession, is curiously omitted in the version published in the National Intelligencer. He designates no capital for the fourth Union on the Pacific. The reader will judge what encouragement these views, proceeding from so distinguished a source, must have afforded to the Secessionists of the cotton States. I trust I have s
Westmoreland County (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 5
buildings, &c., $1,577.84; repairs on real estate in Richmond, $35.26; sundries charged for transportation expenses, $6,481.82. Total, $371,809.96. The road earned in October, 1861, $104,277.63; in August, 1862, $146,160.79; in September, 1862, $118,418.93. These are the largest earnings for any months embraced in the fiscal year. As to the road way itself, it has suffered more from long-continued rains and from raids of the enemy than from the amount of tonnage transported. The track between the Junction and Gordonsville requires ballasting. The sidings at Beaver Dam, Louisa C. H., and Gordonsville, have been extended. The amount of capital stock authorized by the charter of the road is three millions four hundred thousand dollars. The bridges over Rivana river and Moore's creek need replacing by others of a heavier character. In the raid of the enemy on Jackson's River depot, 19th of May, they were piloted by W. P. Rucker, formerly a citizen of Allegheny county.
Albany (New York, United States) (search for this): article 6
y." In the General's opinion, "a smaller evil (than these intestine wars) would be to allow the fragments of the great Republic to form themselves into new Confederacies, probably four. " He then points out what ought to be the boundaries between the new Unions; and at the end of each, goes so far as even to indicate the cities which ought to be the capitals of the three first on this side of the Rocky Mountains to wit: "Columbia, South Carolina;" "Alton, or Quiney, III," and "Albany, New York," excluding Washington City altogether. This indication of capitals contained in the original, now in my possession, is curiously omitted in the version published in the National Intelligencer. He designates no capital for the fourth Union on the Pacific. The reader will judge what encouragement these views, proceeding from so distinguished a source, must have afforded to the Secessionists of the cotton States. I trust I have said enough, and more than enough, to convince every m
United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
The Elections in the United States. --It is said that the Baltimore Clipper, of the 6th, puts down the following as the result in the three States ed as far as heard from at that date: New York — Seymour elected Governor; 19 Democrats and 18 Republicans elected to Congress. New Jersey--Parker, Democrat, elected Governor, and 4 Democrats and 1 Republican elected to Congress.--Illinois--Six Democrats and 5 Republicans elected to Congress. Two doubtful.
United States (United States) (search for this): article 6
pter in the Mystery of the War — Reply of James Buchanan to the Statements of Gen. Scott. James Buchanan, the "old pub. func.," who presided over the late United States, has seen General Scott's long explanation published in the National Intelligencer, and through the same paper publishes a reply. The first allegation of Scotreason to be satisfied with the arrangement, will appear from the following statement: A revolutionary outbreak had occurred in Florida; the troops of the United States had been expelled from Pensacola and the adjacent navy-yard; and Lieutenant Slemmer, of the artillery, with his brave little command, had been forced to take rstatement, should have asserted that "the South Carolina commissioners had already been many days in Washington, and no movement of defence (on the part of the United States) was permitted" These commissioners arrived in Washington on the 27th of December; Gen. Scott's request was made to the President on the 30th. It was complie
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
From Northern Virginia--a raid of the enemy at Fredericksburg. We have very little later intelligence of operations in Northern Virginia. So far as we are informed, indications seem to justify the conclusion that an advance of the enemy is contemplated. It is said that the corps of the Dutch General Sigel crossed the Rappahannock river on Friday night last. Considerable skirmishing has occurred within the last two or three days in the vicinity of Warrenton. We have intelligence ofNorthern Virginia. So far as we are informed, indications seem to justify the conclusion that an advance of the enemy is contemplated. It is said that the corps of the Dutch General Sigel crossed the Rappahannock river on Friday night last. Considerable skirmishing has occurred within the last two or three days in the vicinity of Warrenton. We have intelligence of a Yankee raid upon the town of Fredericksburg. Mr. R. H. Mullen, who left the town after our own troops had retired, and while the enemy were still in possession, has furnished as with the following account of the raid. About 9 o'clock yesterday morning the enemy's cavalry, supposed to number some three or four hundred, crossed the river at Falmouth, and dashed into the town, through Commerce, Main, and Princess Anne streets. Our forces in the town consisted of four companies of cavalry,
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
General Loring and the Enlisting Difficulties in Southwestern Virginia. General Loring has made the following report to the Secretary of War relative to the obstacles it is alleged he threw in the way of recruiting for the Virginia State Line under Gen. Floyd: Headq's Dep't Western Virginia, Charleston, Va., Sept. 22, 1862. Hon. Geo. W. Randolph,Secretary of War, Richmond, Va. Sir: --I observe in the late message of the Governor of the State certain charges that, exceeding my authority as a Confederate officer, I had improperly and mischievously interfered with the non-conscripts in Southwest Virginia, and demoralized the militia. Deprecating a controversy with the Governor, and disclaiming accountability to him for my official acts, I deem it proper to lay my action on the subject before you. In accordance with your telegram of August 15th, stating "persons in the employment of the Government are not regarded as ble to militia duty," and directing me "to re
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...