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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 10, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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Fort Jefferson (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 6
telegraph to New York; but the vessel had sailed a short time before it reached the officer (Col. Scott) to whom it was addressed." A statement of these facts, established by dates, proves conclusively that the President was not only willing but anxious in the briefest period to reinforce Fort Sumter. On the 4th of January, the day before the departure of the Star of the West from New York, as Gen. Scott in his statement admits, succor was sent to Fort Taylor, Key West, and to Fort Jefferson, Tortugas Island, which reached these points in time for their security. He nevertheless speculates on the consequences which might have followed had the reinforcements not reached their destination in due time, and even expresses the extraordinary opinion that, with the possession of these forts, "the rebels might have purchased an early recognition." I shall next advert to the statement that the expedition under Captain Ward, "of three or four small steamers belonging to the coas
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
d not, with a force of five companies, attempt to reinforce Forts Jackson and St. Philip, on the Mississippi, Fort Morgan, below Mobile; Forts Pickens and McRae, in Pensacola harbor; Fort Pulaski. below Savannah; Forts Moultrie and Sumter, Charleston harbor, and Fort Monroe, in Virginia. These "views," both original and supplementary, were published by Gen. Scott in the National Intelligencer, of January 18th, 1861, at the most important and critical period of the Administration.--Their pect, that he regarded himself secure in his position; and yet more from intelligence which late on Saturday evening, (5th January, 1861,) reached the Department that a heavy battery had been erected among the sand hills, at the entrance to Charleston harbor, which would probably destroy any unarmed vessel (and such was the Star of the West,) which might attempt to make its way to Fort Sumter. This important information satisfied the Government that there was no present necessity for sending r
Beaver Dam (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): article 5
e Abolition army, which did it but little injury, save in burning South Anna bridge. A few rails were torn up in several places, and two pieces of tressel work and a few freight cars burned. The damage has all been repaired. The buildings at Beaver dam and the bridge across Cow pasture river were destroyed by the enemy with fire. The first are being rebuilt, the latter will be as soon as suitable timber can be procured, the rapidity of the stream necessitating a permanent bridge. The ea year. As to the road way itself, it has suffered more from long-continued rains and from raids of the enemy than from the amount of tonnage transported. The track between the Junction and Gordonsville requires ballasting. The sidings at Beaver Dam, Louisa C. H., and Gordonsville, have been extended. The amount of capital stock authorized by the charter of the road is three millions four hundred thousand dollars. The bridges over Rivana river and Moore's creek need replacing by other
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
From Northern Virginia--a raid of the enemy at Fredericksburg. We have very little later intelligence of operations in Northern Virginia. So far as we are informed, indications seem to justify the conclusion that an advance of the enemy is contemplated. It is said that the corps of the Dutch General Sigel crossed the Rappahannock river on Friday night last. Considerable skirmishing has occurred within the last two or three days in the vicinity of Warrenton. We have intelligence of a Yankee raid upon the town of Fredericksburg. Mr. R. H. Mullen, who left the town after our own troops had retired, and while the enemy were still in possession, has furnished as with the following account of the raid. About 9 o'clock yesterday morning the enemy's cavalry, supposed to number some three or four hundred, crossed the river at Falmouth, and dashed into the town, through Commerce, Main, and Princess Anne streets. Our forces in the town consisted of four companies of cavalry,
Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
he Blue Ridge Railroad, owned by the State, 17 miles long, being included therein. Length of road owned by the company 188 miles; cost of same per mile, $30,535.61. Total liabilities of company, $1,357,198.30. In reference to the capacity of railroads to continue operations during the present war, it is stated that if the speed of the trains is judiciously reduced, with reference to the depreciation of the rails, our roads will last many years longer. Last summer the road between Hanover C H. and Richmond was in possession of the Abolition army, which did it but little injury, save in burning South Anna bridge. A few rails were torn up in several places, and two pieces of tressel work and a few freight cars burned. The damage has all been repaired. The buildings at Beaver dam and the bridge across Cow pasture river were destroyed by the enemy with fire. The first are being rebuilt, the latter will be as soon as suitable timber can be procured, the rapidity of the stream
Hamilton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
mpanies of the 28th North Carolina regiment and the advance guard of the enemy, on Sunday last. In this engagement the enemy was repulsed, our lose being ten killed and twenty-nine wounded. Later intelligence furnishes us with some fuller particulars of the advance, from which it appears that the enemy landed large forces at Washington on Sunday, and advanced towards Hamilton and took possession of that town. It is reported that they destroyed nearly the entire place. Their force at Hamilton is represented to be about 10,000 infantry, with forty pieces of artillery, and a considerable force of cavalry. They are also reported to have landed a large force at Palmyra, Halifax co., some twenty-five or thirty miles from Weldon.--Gen. Pettigrew commands the Confederate force at Weldon. The Yankees are said to be commanded by Gen. Foster. There was a report in circulation on Saturday that an engagement occurred in the vicinity of Tarboro', Edgecombe county, on Thursday last, bet
Falmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
day night last. Considerable skirmishing has occurred within the last two or three days in the vicinity of Warrenton. We have intelligence of a Yankee raid upon the town of Fredericksburg. Mr. R. H. Mullen, who left the town after our own troops had retired, and while the enemy were still in possession, has furnished as with the following account of the raid. About 9 o'clock yesterday morning the enemy's cavalry, supposed to number some three or four hundred, crossed the river at Falmouth, and dashed into the town, through Commerce, Main, and Princess Anne streets. Our forces in the town consisted of four companies of cavalry, under Lt. Col. Critcher, and two companies of the Chesapeake cavalry, of Col. Bell's command. Colonel Critcher, with his force, was quartered at the hospital building, near the railroad depot. The enemy seemed to be fully aware of his position, and at once charged his camp, capturing about twenty-five or thirty of his men. The remainder of his force
Orangeburg, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
Railroad accident. Augusta, Nov. 7. --A collision occurred on the Columbia branch of the South Carolina Railroad yesterday, near Orangeburg. Lieut. Maroney, of the Palmetto Guards, was killed. Col. P. Phillips and family arrived at Mobile on the 4th, from New Orleans. [Mrs. Phillips is the lady who was imprisoned by Butler, for laughing while the funeral of De Kay, a Federal officer, was passing her house. She suffered much before her release from Ship Island.]
Williamston (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
lation on Saturday that an engagement occurred in the vicinity of Tarboro', Edgecombe county, on Thursday last, between some six regiments of N. C. State troops under the command of Gov. Vance and Gen. Martin, and about 10,000 of the enemy. The Raleigh Journal, of Saturday, says that this report was incorrect, and that nothing of the kind had taken place since the fight of Sunday evening. The impression prevails that the enemy is concentrating his forces in the neighborhood of Williamston, Martin county, with the intention of attacking some point on the line of the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad. A dispatch from Goldsboro', dated ten o'clock Friday night, states that there had been no fighting, and that the enemy had retreated in the direction of Weldon. We do not exactly understand now they could have retreated towards Weldon, since that is the point towards which they were supposed to be advancing. A letter in the Petersburg Express, from Tarboro', dated the 8th, says
Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
There is so longer any doubt that the enemy's forces in Eastern North Carolina are moving on Weldon, with a view of tapping the railroad at that point. We published some days ago an account of a rted to have landed a large force at Palmyra, Halifax co., some twenty-five or thirty miles from Weldon.--Gen. Pettigrew commands the Confederate force at Weldon. The Yankees are said to be commandedWeldon. The Yankees are said to be commanded by Gen. Foster. There was a report in circulation on Saturday that an engagement occurred in the vicinity of Tarboro', Edgecombe county, on Thursday last, between some six regiments of N. C. Statht, states that there had been no fighting, and that the enemy had retreated in the direction of Weldon. We do not exactly understand now they could have retreated towards Weldon, since that is the pWeldon, since that is the point towards which they were supposed to be advancing. A letter in the Petersburg Express, from Tarboro', dated the 8th, says the Yankee army is marching upon that town with 12,000 troops. The i
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