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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 10, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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Goldsboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
nts of N. C. State troops under the command of Gov. Vance and Gen. Martin, and about 10,000 of the enemy. The Raleigh Journal, of Saturday, says that this report was incorrect, and that nothing of the kind had taken place since the fight of Sunday evening. The impression prevails that the enemy is concentrating his forces in the neighborhood of Williamston, Martin county, with the intention of attacking some point on the line of the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad. A dispatch from Goldsboro', dated ten o'clock Friday night, states that there had been no fighting, and that the enemy had retreated in the direction of Weldon. We do not exactly understand now they could have retreated towards Weldon, since that is the point towards which they were supposed to be advancing. A letter in the Petersburg Express, from Tarboro', dated the 8th, says the Yankee army is marching upon that town with 12,000 troops. The information is derived from a Yankee deserter.--They are represen
Palmyra (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
unded. Later intelligence furnishes us with some fuller particulars of the advance, from which it appears that the enemy landed large forces at Washington on Sunday, and advanced towards Hamilton and took possession of that town. It is reported that they destroyed nearly the entire place. Their force at Hamilton is represented to be about 10,000 infantry, with forty pieces of artillery, and a considerable force of cavalry. They are also reported to have landed a large force at Palmyra, Halifax co., some twenty-five or thirty miles from Weldon.--Gen. Pettigrew commands the Confederate force at Weldon. The Yankees are said to be commanded by Gen. Foster. There was a report in circulation on Saturday that an engagement occurred in the vicinity of Tarboro', Edgecombe county, on Thursday last, between some six regiments of N. C. State troops under the command of Gov. Vance and Gen. Martin, and about 10,000 of the enemy. The Raleigh Journal, of Saturday, says that this report w
Tarboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
r thirty miles from Weldon.--Gen. Pettigrew commands the Confederate force at Weldon. The Yankees are said to be commanded by Gen. Foster. There was a report in circulation on Saturday that an engagement occurred in the vicinity of Tarboro', Edgecombe county, on Thursday last, between some six regiments of N. C. State troops under the command of Gov. Vance and Gen. Martin, and about 10,000 of the enemy. The Raleigh Journal, of Saturday, says that this report was incorrect, and that nothinge enemy had retreated in the direction of Weldon. We do not exactly understand now they could have retreated towards Weldon, since that is the point towards which they were supposed to be advancing. A letter in the Petersburg Express, from Tarboro', dated the 8th, says the Yankee army is marching upon that town with 12,000 troops. The information is derived from a Yankee deserter.--They are represented to be within fifteen miles of the town, and within four miles of the Confederate troop
Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
There is so longer any doubt that the enemy's forces in Eastern North Carolina are moving on Weldon, with a view of tapping the railroad at that point. We published some days ago an account of a rted to have landed a large force at Palmyra, Halifax co., some twenty-five or thirty miles from Weldon.--Gen. Pettigrew commands the Confederate force at Weldon. The Yankees are said to be commandedWeldon. The Yankees are said to be commanded by Gen. Foster. There was a report in circulation on Saturday that an engagement occurred in the vicinity of Tarboro', Edgecombe county, on Thursday last, between some six regiments of N. C. Statht, states that there had been no fighting, and that the enemy had retreated in the direction of Weldon. We do not exactly understand now they could have retreated towards Weldon, since that is the pWeldon, since that is the point towards which they were supposed to be advancing. A letter in the Petersburg Express, from Tarboro', dated the 8th, says the Yankee army is marching upon that town with 12,000 troops. The i
Williamston (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
lation on Saturday that an engagement occurred in the vicinity of Tarboro', Edgecombe county, on Thursday last, between some six regiments of N. C. State troops under the command of Gov. Vance and Gen. Martin, and about 10,000 of the enemy. The Raleigh Journal, of Saturday, says that this report was incorrect, and that nothing of the kind had taken place since the fight of Sunday evening. The impression prevails that the enemy is concentrating his forces in the neighborhood of Williamston, Martin county, with the intention of attacking some point on the line of the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad. A dispatch from Goldsboro', dated ten o'clock Friday night, states that there had been no fighting, and that the enemy had retreated in the direction of Weldon. We do not exactly understand now they could have retreated towards Weldon, since that is the point towards which they were supposed to be advancing. A letter in the Petersburg Express, from Tarboro', dated the 8th, says
Hamilton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
mpanies of the 28th North Carolina regiment and the advance guard of the enemy, on Sunday last. In this engagement the enemy was repulsed, our lose being ten killed and twenty-nine wounded. Later intelligence furnishes us with some fuller particulars of the advance, from which it appears that the enemy landed large forces at Washington on Sunday, and advanced towards Hamilton and took possession of that town. It is reported that they destroyed nearly the entire place. Their force at Hamilton is represented to be about 10,000 infantry, with forty pieces of artillery, and a considerable force of cavalry. They are also reported to have landed a large force at Palmyra, Halifax co., some twenty-five or thirty miles from Weldon.--Gen. Pettigrew commands the Confederate force at Weldon. The Yankees are said to be commanded by Gen. Foster. There was a report in circulation on Saturday that an engagement occurred in the vicinity of Tarboro', Edgecombe county, on Thursday last, bet
Conflagration prevented. --The alarm of fire about 12 o'clock Friday night was caused by the foundry of Mr. Joseph R. Anderson, on 7th street, corner of canal, catching fire from the engine. A lot of shingles ignited by the heat of the engine, and the flames communicating to a dry plank leading to the calling, the building was in a fair way of being burnt when discovered by Messrs. Burke and Stewart, who, after considerable exertion, put out the flames with buckets of water.
Conflagration prevented. --The alarm of fire about 12 o'clock Friday night was caused by the foundry of Mr. Joseph R. Anderson, on 7th street, corner of canal, catching fire from the engine. A lot of shingles ignited by the heat of the engine, and the flames communicating to a dry plank leading to the calling, the building was in a fair way of being burnt when discovered by Messrs. Burke and Stewart, who, after considerable exertion, put out the flames with buckets of water.
Joseph R. Anderson (search for this): article 2
Conflagration prevented. --The alarm of fire about 12 o'clock Friday night was caused by the foundry of Mr. Joseph R. Anderson, on 7th street, corner of canal, catching fire from the engine. A lot of shingles ignited by the heat of the engine, and the flames communicating to a dry plank leading to the calling, the building was in a fair way of being burnt when discovered by Messrs. Burke and Stewart, who, after considerable exertion, put out the flames with buckets of water.
Messages of the Governor of Georgia. Milledgeville, Nov. 8. --Gov. Brown's annual Message was read to the Legislature for Thursday. He refers principally to topics of State interest. In a special Message he takes ground against the Conscript law, and submits the subject to the Legislature for action. He also recommends action on the subjects of martial law, habeas corpus, and impressment of private property.
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