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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 10, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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Joseph R. Anderson (search for this): article 6
I did refuse to send 300 men to reinforce Major Anderson at Fort Moultrie, who had not then removedure contingent occasion I would telegraph "Major Anderson, of Fort Moultrie, to hold the forts (Moulefore, through a special messenger sent to Major Anderson for this very purpose. I refer to Major B after their arrival it was announced that Major Anderson had removed from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumecause of a letter received that day from Maj Anderson, stating, in effect, that he regarded himself believed to be in danger, or requested by Major Anderson, It is strange that General Scott was not of January, 1861, between Gov. Pickens and Major Anderson, without the knowledge of the President. . Pickens. Immediately after this outrage Major Anderson sent a flag to the Governor stating that hl of South Carolina, to Washington, whilst Major Anderson deputed Lieut. Hall, of the United States demonstrated by information received from Major Anderson at the War Department on the last day of t[6 more...]
Crittenden (search for this): article 6
ll who recollect the history of the time. But twelve days before, in the annual message of the 3d of December, I had urged upon Congress the adoption of amendments to the Constitution of the same character with those subsequently proposed by Mr. Crittenden, called the "Crittenden compromise."--At that time high hopes were entertained throughout the country that these would be adopted. Besides, I believed, and this correctly, as the event proved, that Major Anderson was then in no danger of attCrittenden compromise."--At that time high hopes were entertained throughout the country that these would be adopted. Besides, I believed, and this correctly, as the event proved, that Major Anderson was then in no danger of attack. Indeed, he and his command were then treated with marked kindness by the authorities and people of Charleston. Under these circumstances, to have sent such a force there would have been only to impair the hope of compromise, to provoke collision, and disappoint the country. There are some details of this conversation in regard to which the Generals memory must be defective. At present I shall specify only one. I could not have stated that on a future contingent occasion I would tel
ct, in a joint note, the commander of the war vessel off Pensacola, and Lieut, Siemmer, commanding Fort Pickens, to commit no act of hostility, and not to land Capt. Vodges's company unless the fort , but the actual, truce of arms concluded at Charleston on the 11th of January, 1861, between Gov. Pickens and Major Anderson, without the knowledge of the President. It was on the 9th of January thar of the West under the American flag, was fired upon in the harbor of Charleston by order of Gov. Pickens. Immediately after this outrage Major Anderson sent a flag to the Governor stating that he pattempted to leave the harbor. Two days after this occurrence, on the 11th of January, Governor Pickens had the audacity to demand of Major Anderson the surrender of the fort. In his answer of tto propose such a measure. Colonel Hayne did not deliver the letter which he bore from Governor Pickens, demanding the surrender of the fort, to the President until the 31st of January. The docum
es were dispatched by the Brooklyn to Fort Pickens without a moment's un- necessary delay. She left Fortress Monroe on the 24th of January. Well-founded apprehensions were, however, entertained at the time of her departure that the reinforcements, with the vessels of war at no great distance from Fort Pickens, could not arrive in time to defend it against the impending attack.--In this state of suspense, and whilst Lieutenant Slemmer was in extreme peril, Senators Sildell, Hunter, and Bigler received a telegraphic dispatch from Senator Mallory, of Florida, dated at Pensacola, on the 28th January, with the urgent request that they should lay it before the President. This dispatch expressed an earnest desire to maintain the peace, as well as the most positive assurance that no attack would be made on Fort Pickens if the present status should be preserved. This proposal was carefully considered, both with a view to the safety of the fort and to the unhappy effect which an ac
November, 1858 AD (search for this): article 6
t, and both Gen. Scott and myself had endeavored in vain to prevail upon Congress to raise several additional regiments for this purpose. In recommending this augmentation of the army, the General states in his report to the War Department of November, 1857, that "it would not more than furnish the reinforcements now greatly needed in Florida, Texas, New Mexico, California, Oregon, Washington, (T) Kansas, Nebraska, Minnesota, leaving not a company for Utah." And again, in his report of November, 1858, he says: "This want of troops to give reasonable security to our citizens in distant settlements, including emigrants on the plains, can scarcely be too strongly stated; but I will only add that as often as we have been obliged to withdraw troops from one frontier in order to reinforce another, the weakened points have been instantly attacked or threatened with formidable invasion." These "views" of Gen. Scott exhibit the crude notions then prevailing even among intelligent a
Wheatland (search for this): article 6
the existing troubles commenced. I have never doubted that my countrymen would yet do me justice. In my special message of the 8th of January, 1861, I presented a full and fair exposition of the alarming condition of the country, and urged Congress either to adopt measures of compromise, or, failing in this, to prepare for the last alternative. In both aspects my recommendation was disregarded. I shall close this document with a quotation of the last sentences of that message, as follows: "In conclusion, it will be permitted me to remark that I have often warned my countrymen of the dangers which now surround us. This may be the last time I shall refer to the subject officially. I feel that my duty has been faithfully, though it may be imperfectly, performed; and whatever the result may be, I shall carry to my grave the consciousness that I at least meant well for my country." Your obedient servant. James Buchanan. Wheatland, near Lancaster, Oct. 23, 1862.
Capt. Vodges's company alone, left the Chesapeake for Fort Pickens about January 22d, and on the 29th President Buchanan, having entered into a quasi armistice with certain leading Seceders at Pensacola and elsewhere, caused Secretaries Holt and Toucey to instruct, in a joint note, the commander of the war vessel off Pensacola, and Lieut, Siemmer, commanding Fort Pickens, to commit no act of hostility, and not to land Capt. Vodges's company unless the fort should be attacked" He afterwards stateinforcements thus provided for as sufficient. This was ready to sail for Fort Sumter on five hours notice. It is of this expedition that General Scott thus speaks: "At that time, when this (the truce) had passed away, Secretaries Holt and Toucey, Capt. Ward, of the navy, and myself, with the knowledge of the President, settled upon the employment, under the Captain, of three or four steamers belonging to the Coast Survey, but he was kept back by the truce." A strange inconsistency.
curred in Florida; the troops of the United States had been expelled from Pensacola and the adjacent navy-yard; and Lieutenant Slemmer, of the artillery, with his brave little command, had been forced to take refuge in Fort Pickens, where he was in iPickens, could not arrive in time to defend it against the impending attack.--In this state of suspense, and whilst Lieutenant Slemmer was in extreme peril, Senators Sildell, Hunter, and Bigler received a telegraphic dispatch from Senator Mallory, ofy, accepting the proposal, with important modifications, which was transmitted by telegraph on the 29th of January to Lieut. Slemmer and to the naval commanders near the station. It is too long for transcription; suffice it to say, it was carefully the 24th of January, she did not arrive at Pensacola until the 5th of February. In the meantime Fort Pickens, with Lieutenant Slemmer (whose conduct deserves high commendation,) and his brave little band were placed, by virtue of this arrangement, i
January 5th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 6
rior, on the 5th of March, 1861, and published in the National Intelligence. Mr. Holt says: "The countermand spoken of (by Mr. Thompson) was not more cordially sanctioned by the President than it was by General Scott and myself; not because of any dissent from the order on the part of the President, but because of a letter received that day from Maj Anderson, stating, in effect, that he regarded himself secure in his position; and yet more from intelligence which late on Saturday evening, (5th January, 1861,) reached the Department that a heavy battery had been erected among the sand hills, at the entrance to Charleston harbor, which would probably destroy any unarmed vessel (and such was the Star of the West,) which might attempt to make its way to Fort Sumter. This important information satisfied the Government that there was no present necessity for sending reinforcements, and that when sent they should go, not in a vessel of commerce, but of war. Hence the countermand was d
is duty. That body, however, throughout its entire session, declined to act on this nomination. Thus, without a collector, it was rendered impossible to collect the revenue. IV. General Scott's statements allege that "the Brooklyn, with Capt. Vodges's company alone, left the Chesapeake for Fort Pickens about January 22d, and on the 29th President Buchanan, having entered into a quasi armistice with certain leading Seceders at Pensacola and elsewhere, caused Secretaries Holt and Toucey to instruct, in a joint note, the commander of the war vessel off Pensacola, and Lieut, Siemmer, commanding Fort Pickens, to commit no act of hostility, and not to land Capt. Vodges's company unless the fort should be attacked" He afterwards states, within brackets, "That joint note I never saw, but suppose the armistice was consequent upon the meeting of the Peace Convention at Washington, and was understood to terminate with it." The statements betray a singular want of memory on the part o
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