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California (California, United States) (search for this): article 10
t to enact the same rolls now being played by Jeff. Davis.--The patriotism of our people and his imbecility were our safety. When I represented to the Government that, in my opinion, General Fremont had not the capacity to conduct successfully the military command which had been entrusted to him, (his conspiracy against the Government had not then developed itself,) I was not unprepared for the indignation which this expression of opinion brought upon me on the part of the General and his California contractors and dependents, but confess the astonishment with which the course. the Missouri Demurral and certain other newspapers filled me" The Rhode Island soldier Unruly. The Hartford (Conn,) Times had been shown a private letter from Providence, from which the following is an extract. The letter is dated October 26th, 1862. We had some excitement here last week at the time of the departure of the 12th regiment. Part of the men refused to go, because they had not rec
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): article 10
, in my opinion, General Fremont had not the capacity to conduct successfully the military command which had been entrusted to him, (his conspiracy against the Government had not then developed itself,) I was not unprepared for the indignation which this expression of opinion brought upon me on the part of the General and his California contractors and dependents, but confess the astonishment with which the course. the Missouri Demurral and certain other newspapers filled me" The Rhode Island soldier Unruly. The Hartford (Conn,) Times had been shown a private letter from Providence, from which the following is an extract. The letter is dated October 26th, 1862. We had some excitement here last week at the time of the departure of the 12th regiment. Part of the men refused to go, because they had not received the whole of their bounty. Gov. Sprague ordered part of the battery on the ground to intimidate them; but that did not do much good, for the 12th made a charge
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): article 10
ad not the capacity to conduct successfully the military command which had been entrusted to him, (his conspiracy against the Government had not then developed itself,) I was not unprepared for the indignation which this expression of opinion brought upon me on the part of the General and his California contractors and dependents, but confess the astonishment with which the course. the Missouri Demurral and certain other newspapers filled me" The Rhode Island soldier Unruly. The Hartford (Conn,) Times had been shown a private letter from Providence, from which the following is an extract. The letter is dated October 26th, 1862. We had some excitement here last week at the time of the departure of the 12th regiment. Part of the men refused to go, because they had not received the whole of their bounty. Gov. Sprague ordered part of the battery on the ground to intimidate them; but that did not do much good, for the 12th made a charge and took one of the guns and spike
United States (United States) (search for this): article 10
t proportions, the Constitutions of individual States cannot be allowed to stand in the way of its vigorous prosecution. Gen. M'Clellan on Delinquent officers. A Court-Martial, of which Brig Gen. Hancock was President, has just found Col. Owens, Sixty- ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, guilty of a charge of "conduct prejudicial to good order and military discipline, and unbecoming an officer and a gentle, man. The Court sentenced him (Col, Owen) to be dismissed the service of the United States. Gen McClellan in his order says: The finding and sentence of the Court are fully supported by the testimony, and are approved by the Major General commanding. It appears that on the 4th of October, 1862, the regiment of the of the accused was encamped near Harper's Ferry; that the forenoon of the day was passed by the accused at the headquarters of his brigade, in attendance upon a Court of Inquiry on the question of rank between himself and another officer. that he was the
Rockville, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 10
he head at the right temple, passing through the head, and lodging just inside the skin on the left side. The skull is completely shattered, and the pistol was evidently held close to the head.--Major R. was known as a pleasant, social gentleman, but sometimes gave way to fits of despondency, and it is believed that he was in a fit of temporary insanity when he committed the rash act. He was forty-two years of age and a widower, but leaves six small children, who reside with his mother at Rockville, Md. A large circle of friends will regret his untimely end. Abe Lincoln Particular on Constitutional power. The New York World has the following paragraph: President Lincoln replied to the Common Council of Washington yesterday, who urged upon him the propriety of building a military railroad from Washington to Point of Rocks, that he could not do so, as Congress had explicitly taken away his power, and that the rebellion in the West would have been crushed long since had
Meridian (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 10
e that the Proclamation bugbear of the President was the cause. The Federal programme in the Southwest. The Corinta correspondent of the Cincinnati Gazettes says it was stated there that a strong Federal force, from the direction of Memphis, has occupied Tupelo, and that in a few days another strong column will move down on the Memphis and Charleston, and Mississippi Central roads, and, taking possession of Grenada and Jackson, cut up the railroad connecting with Vicksburg, destroy Meridian, the junction of the first-named roads — thus preventing railroad communication with Richmond — and move upon Vicksburg from the rear, while their gunboats engage the Confederates from the river. The writer adds: There is probably no move which can be made by our Generals that would be easier of accomplishment and none, certainly, which promises richer results. The army of Van-Dorn and Price had already been badly whipped, and yet that is the only considerable force between us and Mob
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 10
m with bits of bread, and one whole loaf struck him on the head and nearly knocked him off his horse. The very devil was to pay for a time, but finally things got calmed down; but the boys did not go, and they have not all gone yet. It is generally conceded by all classes that the men should have their pay, and that Governor Sprague did not act a wise part. Some of the plans of Gen'l Mitchell Interfered with by his Death. On the 13th ultimo, Major-Gen. Mitchell, in command at Hilton Head, S. C., wrote a letter to Secretary Chase, giving the following as his intentions, if permitted to carry out his views. As he died of yellow fever on the 24th his plans were not as promptly carried out as they might have been. If he were, indeed, under my orders, I have an immense work for him to do, which I would commence without an hour's delay. I would begin the organization of my plantation system. A perfect census of all the blacks inhabiting the islands would be promptly made, M
Washington (United States) (search for this): article 10
They were from Washington, in a carriage loaded with sundry family stores, in which was found quinine and morphine, worth in the South $10,000. On the person of Valley was found a large contraband mail. He preached in Washington last Sunday, and preached in Richmond in the latter part of September. He and the younger female were sent to the old Capitol prison, while the elder, 70 years old, was turned loose. Messrs. Kidwell, of Georgetown; Peale, of Alexandria; and Milburn, of Washington city, druggists, were on Thursday arrested and sent to the old Capitol prison for selling these parties the contraband medicines, knowing, as is alleged where they were to be carried. They were formidably armed with protections and passes from Major- Generals and Provost Marshals and with a certificate of loyalty as strong as words could make it from a Cabinet Minister. As a specimen of the correspondence which these F. F. V.'s carried on their persons, we extract the following memorandum
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 10
e circle of friends will regret his untimely end. Abe Lincoln Particular on Constitutional power. The New York World has the following paragraph: President Lincoln replied to the Common Council of Washington yesterday, who urged upon him the propriety of building a military railroad from Washington to Point of Rocks, that he could not do so, as Congress had explicitly taken away his power, and that the rebellion in the West would have been crushed long since had he possessed the power to build a railway from Louisville to and through Eastern Tennessee. Good Heavens! President Lincoln, of his own motion, without any warrant in the Constitution of his country or the laws of war, by proclamation frees four millions of slaves, utterly outside of his control, utterly outside the limits of his just authority, but in the same breath he declares that he has no power to build railroads in the West, which he thinks is absolutely necessary to crush the rebellion in that re-
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 10
r says: The finding and sentence of the Court are fully supported by the testimony, and are approved by the Major General commanding. It appears that on the 4th of October, 1862, the regiment of the of the accused was encamped near Harper's Ferry; that the forenoon of the day was passed by the accused at the headquarters of his brigade, in attendance upon a Court of Inquiry on the question of rank between himself and another officer. that he was then very much intoxicated; that at haers to get his dinner, the accused claiming to have received a general permission from his commanding officer to dine at a house near the camp; that, in stead of returning to his regiment, he was found late in the afternoon, in the streets of Harper's Ferry, very drunk, and engaged in a scandalous quarrel and collision with the Lieutenant Colonel of his own regiment, by whom he was pulled from his horse and thrown violently upon the ground; that after dark he was arrested by the provost guard fo
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