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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 19, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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rebels had been allowed to seize several of those forts, and from the bad condition of others were likely to gain possession of them also. Primarily the blame rested exclusively on me. Hence, to vindicate my sworn allegiance to the Union and professional conduct, the report was submitted to President Lincoln at an early day, (in his administration,) and recently to the world. To that short paper ex-President Buchanan publishes a reply of double the length in the Intelligencer, of the 1st inst. My rejoinder, from necessity, if not taste, will be short, for I hold the pen in a rheumatic hand, and am without aide-de-camp or amanuensis, and without a printed document and my own official papers. Unable, in my present condition, to make an analysis of the ex-President's long reply, I avail myself of a substitute furnished by an accidental visitor, who has kindly marked the few points which he thinks may require some slight notice at my hands. 1. To account for not having gar
Capture of Major Reid Sanders. --The Baltimore Sun announces the capture of Major Reid Sanders, son of George N. Sanders, Esq. on the 3d instant, on one of the creeks which empties into the Chesapeake. The Sun says at the time of the capture he was waiting for an English vessel to convey him to Europe with Confederate dispatches.
Judge C. P. Smith, for twelve years Chief Justice of the State of Mississippi, died on the 10th inst.
Later from Knoxville. Knoxville, Nov. 17. --We have advices from Memphis to the 10th inst., inclusive. It is said that Porter's fleet will attack Vicksburg as soon as it can pass the bar at President Island. Gold is selling in Memphis at 40 per cent. prem over "greenbacks." About 800 bales of cotton per week were being sent in from West Tennessee--none from Arkansas or Mississippi. Western men in the Abolition army are said to be anxious for peace. All the negroes in the vicinity of Memphis have left their owners. Every Abolition officer has a black servant. A gunboat guards the weekly steamers to Cairo. The order expelling certain families of Confederate soldiers was not enforced. Gen. Price's troops are in fine spirits such eager to avenge the loss of Corinth.
Judge Mitchell King of Charleston, S. C., died at Flat Rock, N. C., on the 13th inst.
January 29th (search for this): article 14
ws in one of the earlier speeches of the same ex-Secretary after his return to Virginia 4. One of my statements, complaining of the joint countermand, sent through the Secretaries of War and Navy, to prevent the landing at Fort Pickens of Capt. Vodges's company, unless the fort should be attacked, is cited by the ex-President to proven, "singular want of memory" on my part; and a note from Secretary Holt is adduced to show that I had entirely approved of the joint countermand the day (January 29) that it was prepared. Few persons are as little liable to make a misstatement by accident as Mr. Holt, and no one more incapable of making one by design; yet I have not the slightest recollection of any interview with him on this subject. I do remember, however, that Mr. Holt, on some matter of business, approached my bedside about that time when I was suffering greatly from an access of pain. Mr. Buchanan, Mr. Holt, and myself were all landsmen, and could know but little of the im
ion, from Northern repositories to Southern arsenals, so that on the breaking out of the maturing rebellion they might be found without cost, except to the United States, in the most convenient positions for distribution among the insurgents. So, too, with the one hundred and twenty or one hundred and forty pieces of heavy artillery, which the same Secretary ordered from Pittsburg to Ship Island, in Lake Borgne, and Galveston, Texas, for forts not yet erected! Accidently learning, early in March, that, under this posthumous order, the shipment of these guns had commenced, I communicated the fact to Secretary Holt (acting for Secretary Cameron) just in time to defeat the robbery. But on this point we may hear ex-Secretary Floyd himself. At Richmond he expressly claimed the honor of defeating all my plans and solicitations respecting the forts, and received his reward; it being there universally admitted that but for that victory over me there could have been no rebellion!
Fifty dollars reward. --Ranaway from the subscriber about the first of last April, a negro woman named Daphney. She is about 30 years old is tall and black, has a high forehead, and is quite good looking. I purchased her of Nath'l Tyler, who resides on the corner of 2d and Franklin streets. She has a sister living on Franklin street, below Johnson's livery stable. I will give the above reward for her apprehension and delivery at Hestor Davis's jail. Jno. P. Pharson. no 19--1w*
October 21st (search for this): article 14
from the dignity of the subject to which it relates. It is gratifying to observe that neither of our venerable and eminent correspondents, in controverting the statements of the other, transcends the limits of candid criticism while dealing with topics at once so delicate and partly of a personal nature. Lieut-Gen. Scott's rejoinder. To the Editors of the National Intelligencer: I regret to find myself in a controversy with the venerable ex-President Buchanan. Recently (October 21) you published my official report to President Lincoln dated March 30, 1861, giving a summary of my then recent connection with our principal Southern forts, which I am sorry to perceive has given offence to the ex-President. That result, purely incidental, did not enter into my purpose in drawing up the paper; but, on reflection, I suppose that, under the circumstances, offence was unavoidable. Let it be remembered, that the new President had a right to demand of me — the immediate
October 29th (search for this): article 14
y Cameron) just in time to defeat the robbery. But on this point we may hear ex-Secretary Floyd himself. At Richmond he expressly claimed the honor of defeating all my plans and solicitations respecting the forts, and received his reward; it being there universally admitted that but for that victory over me there could have been no rebellion! 3. Mr. Buchanan complains that I published, without permission, January 13, 1861, my views, ad- dressed to him and the Secretary of War, October 29 and 30. 1860. But that act was caused, as I explained to him at the time, by the misrepresentations of the views in one of the earlier speeches of the same ex-Secretary after his return to Virginia 4. One of my statements, complaining of the joint countermand, sent through the Secretaries of War and Navy, to prevent the landing at Fort Pickens of Capt. Vodges's company, unless the fort should be attacked, is cited by the ex-President to proven, "singular want of memory" on my part; a
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