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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 19, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 496 total hits in 241 results.

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Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
From Northern Virginia. During yesterday not even a rumor was in circulation with reference to affairs in Northern Virginia. It seems to be the general conclusion that there is no probability of an advance of the enemy from the line of the upper Rappahannock. From the Valley we have nothing later than has already appeared. Everything is apparently at a standstill. From Northern Virginia. During yesterday not even a rumor was in circulation with reference to affairs in Northern Virginia. It seems to be the general conclusion that there is no probability of an advance of the enemy from the line of the upper Rappahannock. From the Valley we have nothing later than has already appeared. Everything is apparently at a standstill.
John S. Cook (search for this): article 1
Arrival of prisoners. --Seventeen Abolition prisoners of war, mostly members of the 10th New York regiment, were received at the Libby Prison yesterday, from Fredericksburg, Va., having been captured in the vicinity of that place. Of this number four--viz: One belonging to the 98th New York, one to the 6th U. S. cavalry, and two to the 139th New York--professed to be deserters, and not to desire to go North again. Last night, three Abolition prisoners, captured on Saturday near Cook's store, 2½ miles from Gloucester Point. arrived at the above prison. There are now about 500 in confinement there, half of whom are subject to exchange or parole as prisoners of war.
Gloucester Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Arrival of prisoners. --Seventeen Abolition prisoners of war, mostly members of the 10th New York regiment, were received at the Libby Prison yesterday, from Fredericksburg, Va., having been captured in the vicinity of that place. Of this number four--viz: One belonging to the 98th New York, one to the 6th U. S. cavalry, and two to the 139th New York--professed to be deserters, and not to desire to go North again. Last night, three Abolition prisoners, captured on Saturday near Cook's store, 2½ miles from Gloucester Point. arrived at the above prison. There are now about 500 in confinement there, half of whom are subject to exchange or parole as prisoners of war.
November 18th (search for this): article 1
The enemy at Franklin — flag of truce, &c. Petersburg, November 18. --The enemy, supposed to number considerably over a brigade, appeared this morning at Franklin, on the Blackwater river, and attempted to cross under cover of shells. The Confederates resisted successfully for two hours, when the Abolitionists retired. We captured twelve or fourteen. Our less none, so far as heard from. The flag of truce boat has been signaled from City Point, but the train will not be up before 8 o'clock. Parties direct from Lower Brandon assert, positively, that there is no fleet in that vicinity, nor has there been any. No fleet in sight, up or down the river.
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
The enemy at Franklin — flag of truce, &c. Petersburg, November 18. --The enemy, supposed to number considerably over a brigade, appeared this morning at Franklin, on the Blackwater river, and attempted to cross under cover of shells. The Confederates resisted successfully for two hours, when the Abolitionists retired. We captured twelve or fourteen. Our less none, so far as heard from. The flag of truce boat has been signaled from City Point, but the train will not be up before 8 o'clock. Parties direct from Lower Brandon assert, positively, that there is no fleet in that vicinity, nor has there been any. No fleet in sight, up or down the river.
Zuni (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
The enemy at Franklin — flag of truce, &c. Petersburg, November 18. --The enemy, supposed to number considerably over a brigade, appeared this morning at Franklin, on the Blackwater river, and attempted to cross under cover of shells. The Confederates resisted successfully for two hours, when the Abolitionists retired. We captured twelve or fourteen. Our less none, so far as heard from. The flag of truce boat has been signaled from City Point, but the train will not be up before 8 o'clock. Parties direct from Lower Brandon assert, positively, that there is no fleet in that vicinity, nor has there been any. No fleet in sight, up or down the river.
on, of Virginia, and was educated at Hampden Sidney College where he graduated in the year 1824;#x2014;When the University opened in 1825, he was one among the first that matriculated. It was there that he received the rudiments of his legal education. In 1827 he came to the bar in his native county, and gradually rising to the head of it, he practised with great success in that and the adjoining counties for many years — if we are not mistaken, even to the day of his death. About the year 1830 he was elected to the lower house of the Virginia Legislature, where he soon enquired an enviable reputation as a debater and a through man of business. He retired from the Legislature after a few years to resume his practice at the bar, but was returned to the State Senate again about the year 1862. At that time he was already one among the most prominent men of the State, and his reputation continuing to increase, he was made a member of his Cabinet by General Taylor--Upon the death of th
, and gradually rising to the head of it, he practised with great success in that and the adjoining counties for many years — if we are not mistaken, even to the day of his death. About the year 1830 he was elected to the lower house of the Virginia Legislature, where he soon enquired an enviable reputation as a debater and a through man of business. He retired from the Legislature after a few years to resume his practice at the bar, but was returned to the State Senate again about the year 1862. At that time he was already one among the most prominent men of the State, and his reputation continuing to increase, he was made a member of his Cabinet by General Taylor--Upon the death of that lamented chief he retired to private life. He devoted, of late years, a great porion of his time to the subject of internal improvements, and was believed to possess as thorough a knowledge of the resources of Virginia as any man in the State. He was elected to the Senate last winter. Mr. Pr
of this State in the Confederate Senate, died at his re in Montgomery county last Sunday. He was about fifty-nine years old at the time of his states and had been Senator not quite a year. He was the oldest son of the late Governor Preston, of Virginia, and was educated at Hampden Sidney College where he graduated in the year 1824;#x2014;When the University opened in 1825, he was one among the first that matriculated. It was there that he received the rudiments of his legal education. In 1827 he came to the bar in his native county, and gradually rising to the head of it, he practised with great success in that and the adjoining counties for many years — if we are not mistaken, even to the day of his death. About the year 1830 he was elected to the lower house of the Virginia Legislature, where he soon enquired an enviable reputation as a debater and a through man of business. He retired from the Legislature after a few years to resume his practice at the bar, but was returned t
Hon Wm Bullard Preston. This gentleman, who was one of the Senators of this State in the Confederate Senate, died at his re in Montgomery county last Sunday. He was about fifty-nine years old at the time of his states and had been Senator not quite a year. He was the oldest son of the late Governor Preston, of Virginia, and was educated at Hampden Sidney College where he graduated in the year 1824;#x2014;When the University opened in 1825, he was one among the first that matriculated. It was there that he received the rudiments of his legal education. In 1827 he came to the bar in his native county, and gradually rising to the head of it, he practised with great success in that and the adjoining counties for many years — if we are not mistaken, even to the day of his death. About the year 1830 he was elected to the lower house of the Virginia Legislature, where he soon enquired an enviable reputation as a debater and a through man of business. He retired from the Legislatu
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