hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 24 0 Browse Search
Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Ann Thomas 10 0 Browse Search
Winfield Scott 8 2 Browse Search
John S. Cook 8 0 Browse Search
Butler 8 4 Browse Search
Buchanan 7 7 Browse Search
Bell 7 1 Browse Search
William H. Lyons 7 1 Browse Search
November 18th 7 7 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 19, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 22 total hits in 9 results.

Rochdale (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 15
Latest from England. Mr. Gorden against Intervention — the London Times and the Democratic party, and on Gen. Butler and Mrs. Phillips. &c. Mr. Cobden has addressed his constituents at Rochdale. He spoke at length on the prevailing distress at Lancashire. He regarded that distress as a national question, and if public and private aid proved insufficient to relieve it, Parliament would have to make provision for it. He then referred to the American war, and said that it would be a waste of time for foreigners to attempt to influence the combatants. To interfere in the war, or to recognize the South, would do more harm than good, and fall to bring forward cotton. As to how the contest was going to end, he confessed his inability to form any opinion but if compelled to make a guess, he would not make the same guess, that Earl Russell and Mr. Gladstone did. He did not believe that if the war should soon be brought to a termination it would end in the separation of the N
United States (United States) (search for this): article 15
is war as to throw the North American continent back for a century. The "Times" on Butler. The Times publishes a private letter from New Orleans, in which it is stated that Mrs. Phillips, who suffered such barbarous treatment from Gen. Butler for having smiled as the funeral of a Federal soldier passed, has completely lost her reason. Gen. Butler has, by a recent proclamation, required every person in the city to register himself or herself as either a friend or an enemy of the United States, and at the same time to give in a register of their property; and no article could be sued for or sold or enjoyed in any way, which was not regularly registered. The Times remarks on this letter: "It is a senseless humiliation and a useless insult to drive up a whole population under the muzzle of cannon and under the threats of being utterly despoiled, to commit a sort of white perjury. A gentleman with a little tact might by this have let loose those three million bales of cotton
Lancaster (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 15
Latest from England. Mr. Gorden against Intervention — the London Times and the Democratic party, and on Gen. Butler and Mrs. Phillips. &c. Mr. Cobden has addressed his constituents at Rochdale. He spoke at length on the prevailing distress at Lancashire. He regarded that distress as a national question, and if public and private aid proved insufficient to relieve it, Parliament would have to make provision for it. He then referred to the American war, and said that it would be a waste of time for foreigners to attempt to influence the combatants. To interfere in the war, or to recognize the South, would do more harm than good, and fall to bring forward cotton. As to how the contest was going to end, he confessed his inability to form any opinion but if compelled to make a guess, he would not make the same guess, that Earl Russell and Mr. Gladstone did. He did not believe that if the war should soon be brought to a termination it would end in the separation of the N
Latest from England. Mr. Gorden against Intervention — the London Times and the Democratic party, and on Gen. Butler and Mrs. Phillips. &c. Mr. Cobden has addressed his constituents at Rochdale. He spoke at length on the prevailing distress at Lancashire. He regarded that distress as a national question, and if public and private aid proved insufficient to relieve it, Parliament would have to make provision for it. He then referred to the American war, and said that it would be a waste of time for foreigners to attempt to influence the combatants. To interfere in the war, or to recognize the South, would do more harm than good, and fall to bring forward cotton. As to how the contest was going to end, he confessed his inability to form any opinion but if compelled to make a guess, he would not make the same guess, that Earl Russell and Mr. Gladstone did. He did not believe that if the war should soon be brought to a termination it would end in the separation of the N
Latest from England. Mr. Gorden against Intervention — the London Times and the Democratic party, and on Gen. Butler and Mrs. Phillips. &c. Mr. Cobden has addressed his constituents at Rochdale. He spoke at length on the prevailing distress at Lancashire. He regarded that distress as a national question, and if public and private aid proved insufficient to relieve it, Parliament would have to make provision for it. He then referred to the American war, and said that it would bee the same union in America. Interference by force would do more than anything else to strengthen the Union Government, and the cost to England in six months would be more than sufficient to feed the distressed cotton operatives for ten years. Mr. Cobden concluded by reproaching the Palmerston Government for its extravagance, and advocated retrenchment. The ringleaders of the great robbery of the Bank of England note paper had been arrested. One of them was taken in the act of printing no
atants. To interfere in the war, or to recognize the South, would do more harm than good, and fall to bring forward cotton. As to how the contest was going to end, he confessed his inability to form any opinion but if compelled to make a guess, he would not make the same guess, that Earl Russell and Mr. Gladstone did. He did not believe that if the war should soon be brought to a termination it would end in the separation of the North and South. He thought those who professed so much for Italian unity ought to appreciate more the same union in America. Interference by force would do more than anything else to strengthen the Union Government, and the cost to England in six months would be more than sufficient to feed the distressed cotton operatives for ten years. Mr. Cobden concluded by reproaching the Palmerston Government for its extravagance, and advocated retrenchment. The ringleaders of the great robbery of the Bank of England note paper had been arrested. One of them w
to relieve it, Parliament would have to make provision for it. He then referred to the American war, and said that it would be a waste of time for foreigners to attempt to influence the combatants. To interfere in the war, or to recognize the South, would do more harm than good, and fall to bring forward cotton. As to how the contest was going to end, he confessed his inability to form any opinion but if compelled to make a guess, he would not make the same guess, that Earl Russell and Mr. Gladstone did. He did not believe that if the war should soon be brought to a termination it would end in the separation of the North and South. He thought those who professed so much for Italian unity ought to appreciate more the same union in America. Interference by force would do more than anything else to strengthen the Union Government, and the cost to England in six months would be more than sufficient to feed the distressed cotton operatives for ten years. Mr. Cobden concluded by reproac
Latest from England. Mr. Gorden against Intervention — the London Times and the Democratic party, and on Gen. Butler and Mrs. Phillips. &c. Mr. Cobden has addressed his constituents at Rochdale. He spoke at length on the prevailing distress at Lancashire. He regarded that distress as a national question, and if public and private aid proved insufficient to relieve it, Parliament would have to make provision for it. He then referred to the American war, and said that it would bhe result may very probably be so to lengthen and embitter this war as to throw the North American continent back for a century. The "Times" on Butler. The Times publishes a private letter from New Orleans, in which it is stated that Mrs. Phillips, who suffered such barbarous treatment from Gen. Butler for having smiled as the funeral of a Federal soldier passed, has completely lost her reason. Gen. Butler has, by a recent proclamation, required every person in the city to register hi
den against Intervention — the London Times and the Democratic party, and on Gen. Butler and Mrs. Phillips. &c. Mr. Cobden has addressed his constituents at Ro to throw the North American continent back for a century. The "Times" on Butler. The Times publishes a private letter from New Orleans, in which it is stated that Mrs. Phillips, who suffered such barbarous treatment from Gen. Butler for having smiled as the funeral of a Federal soldier passed, has completely lost her reason. Gen. Butler has, by a recent proclamation, required every person in the city to register himself or herself as either a friend or an enemy of the United Statect might by this have let loose those three million bales of cotton. But while Butler commands, New Orleans can serve for no other purpose without but as a warning t with New Orleans, calling his Lordship's attention to the arbitrary acts of Gen. Butler in respect to foreigners, and urging the necessity of a chief consul and a B