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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 21, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Russian River (Alaska, United States) (search for this): article 9
t in a very limited way be controlled by the Government. Earl Russell assured Mr. Adams that the policy of the English Government concerning contraband trade was that of all other nations and of the U. States themselves, whose precedents on that very question were as clear and as precise as could be desired. As an illustration of this, he said to our Minister that, at the time of the war between the Allied Powers and Russia, the United States had ostensibly carried contraband goods in Russian ports, and constructed ships for the Czar Nicholas, and that not with standing the protest of France and England. He did not want to believe, as he had been told, that either the President of the United States, Mr. Pierce, or his Secretary of State, Mr. Marcy, were at all encouraging such unlawful acts. He preferred to think that they did all they could to oppose them, but the fact that they could not succeed ought to prove to the Minister of the U. States how difficult it was for the Eng
Brunswick, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): article 9
Late Northern News. From files of New York and Baltimore papers, of the 14th, 15th, and 16th, we make up an interesting summary of the current news at the North: The late M'Clellan —— the way he Behaves at Trenton — his parting with the army — his chances for the Senatorship. Delegations from Brunswick, Me., and Newark, N. J., have reached Trenton with invitations for the young Napoleon to visit those cities. The Daily Register, of Patterson, N. J., nominates him for the vacant seat in the U. S. Senate. A correspondent of the New York World, writing from Trenton, on Friday, has the following gossip about him. The seclusion of the General has been somewhat relaxed to-day, and many distinguished citizens from this neighborhood and other parts of New Jersey have called upon him. All were received with easy grace and affable smiles. Little if any reference was made to the mortifying circumstances of the hour, but the future was talked of by the guests with confidence
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
ain to a condition of happiness and prosperity. [Applause.] Threats of General Rosecrans--Negroes for Washington. A dispatch from Nashville, dated the 15th, says a large amount of supplies will be massed there, when the grand army of the West will proceed towards East Tennessee. It adds that "Gen. Rosecrans intends to hang all the guerrillas, and defies the threatened rebel retaliation." A dispatch from Fortress Monroe says: All the able-bodied contrabands here and at Hampton have recently been taken to Washington, and those unable to work are to be sent to Craney Island. A conversation between Mr. Adams and Earl Russell about contraband trade. Private letters of a semi-official nature relative to the contraband trade carried on by English merchants with the rebels, containing some information about the views entertained by the English Cabinet on that subject, have been received in Washington. It seems that not long since our Minister in London had a
Milford (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 9
Late Northern News. From files of New York and Baltimore papers, of the 14th, 15th, and 16th, we make up an interesting summary of the current news at the North: The late M'Clellan —— the way he Behaves at Trenton — his parting with the army — his chances for the Senatorship. Delegations from Brunswick, Me., and Newark, N. J., have reached Trenton with invitations for the young Napoleon to visit those cities. The Daily Register, of Patterson, N. J., nominates him for the vacant seat in the U. S. Senate. A correspondent of the New York World, writing from Trenton, on Friday, has the following gossip about him. The seclusion of the General has been somewhat relaxed to-day, and many distinguished citizens from this neighborhood and other parts of New Jersey have called upon him. All were received with easy grace and affable smiles. Little if any reference was made to the mortifying circumstances of the hour, but the future was talked of by the guests with confidenc
United States (United States) (search for this): article 9
could be restored with George B. McClellan President of the re-United States, the Government had done exactly the thing to produce that efferge their duty as citizens of New York, and, as citizens of the United States to discountenance the usurpation of rights which did not belongoved that acts such as these were not calculated to confirm the United States in the genuineness of the protestations of neutrality and good t the time of the war between the Allied Powers and Russia, the United States had ostensibly carried contraband goods in Russian ports, and c believe, as he had been told, that either the President of the United States, Mr. Pierce, or his Secretary of State, Mr. Marcy, were at all e the utmost watchfulness upon all cargoes in clearance for the United States. Lo! the poor negro. The Cairo correspondent of the Crtment, in order that the officers so violating the laws of the United States may be duty punished. A Suspicious flag. It was rumor
Essex County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
r parts of New Jersey have called upon him. All were received with easy grace and affable smiles. Little if any reference was made to the mortifying circumstances of the hour, but the future was talked of by the guests with confidence and cheerfulness. In the morning the General, accompanied by his family and members of his staff, rode out, and were everywhere hailed with marked interest and feeling. In the afternoon, about three o'clock, quite a delegation of citizens of note from Essex county called in a body to offer their respects to "Little Mac," whom they seem very willing to adopt as a Jerseyman. If rumors be true, the name will not be inappropriate, for it said the General will be allowed to make Trenton his headquarters during the winter — his sphere of activity to radiate from it, meanwhile, in various directions. He will probably visit New York during the coming week, although on what day is entirely uncertain. One thing is very sure, viz: that notwithstanding the
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
t notwithstanding the numbers and devotion of the "Army of the Potomac," McClellan does not know how many friends he really has in the country, nor will he until he shall have entered the great metropolis. A letter in the same paper, from Warrenton, says: Monday was occupied by Gen. McClellan in passing among the various camps, reviewing his troops and taking a final leave of both officers and soldiers. The course was first to Fits John Porter's corps. Sykes's division of regulars complaints against those who had removed from command their beloved leader. This is the type of all which happened during the leave-taking of Gen. McClellan from the army of the Potomac. At noon he dined at the Warren Green Hotel, at Warrenton, with General Burnside. After dinner the corps near by were passed through, as during the forenoon. Next morning Gen. McClellan at the railroad cars had an interesting and affecting interview with Gen. Burnside. After this they parted, a
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
policy animating the war, he believed the Union could be restored again to a condition of happiness and prosperity. [Applause.] Threats of General Rosecrans--Negroes for Washington. A dispatch from Nashville, dated the 15th, says a large amount of supplies will be massed there, when the grand army of the West will proceed towards East Tennessee. It adds that "Gen. Rosecrans intends to hang all the guerrillas, and defies the threatened rebel retaliation." A dispatch from Fortress Monroe says: All the able-bodied contrabands here and at Hampton have recently been taken to Washington, and those unable to work are to be sent to Craney Island. A conversation between Mr. Adams and Earl Russell about contraband trade. Private letters of a semi-official nature relative to the contraband trade carried on by English merchants with the rebels, containing some information about the views entertained by the English Cabinet on that subject, have been received in Was
Chambersburg (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 9
sting summary of the current news at the North: The late M'Clellan —— the way he Behaves at Trenton — his parting with the army — his chances for the Senatorship. Delegations from Brunswick, Me., and Newark, N. J., have reached Trenton with invitations for the young Napoleon to visit those cities. The Daily Register, of Patterson, N. J., nominates him for the vacant seat in the U. S. Senate. A correspondent of the New York World, writing from Trenton, on Friday, has the following gossip about him. The seclusion of the General has been somewhat relaxed to-day, and many distingrs be true, the name will not be inappropriate, for it said the General will be allowed to make Trenton his headquarters during the winter — his sphere of activity to radiate from it, meanwhile, in vity, but they would not allow him to serve in active duty, for he had been ordered to report at Trenton, where there was no disturbance that he had heard of, [laughter,] the Democratic party havin
France (France) (search for this): article 9
policy of the English Government concerning contraband trade was that of all other nations and of the U. States themselves, whose precedents on that very question were as clear and as precise as could be desired. As an illustration of this, he said to our Minister that, at the time of the war between the Allied Powers and Russia, the United States had ostensibly carried contraband goods in Russian ports, and constructed ships for the Czar Nicholas, and that not with standing the protest of France and England. He did not want to believe, as he had been told, that either the President of the United States, Mr. Pierce, or his Secretary of State, Mr. Marcy, were at all encouraging such unlawful acts. He preferred to think that they did all they could to oppose them, but the fact that they could not succeed ought to prove to the Minister of the U. States how difficult it was for the English Government to stop the contraband trade between English subjects and the rebels. The private
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