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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 4, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Gallatin, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 13
Narrow escape of Gen Morgan. A correspondent of the Atlanta Confederacy writes the following account of a narrow escape from the Yankees, made by the dashing Morgan, and vouches for its truth. We see statements of the same affair in other papers: While Gen. Morgan's command was at Gallatin he received information that a large division of the Abolition army was approaching Nashville by the way of Tyree Springs. He accordingly selected three hundred men from the brigade for the purpose of ambushing them and capturing their wagon train. He arrived at the road just as the head of the Yankee column was approaching, and, selecting a good position, succeeded in pouring a very destructive fire into them. The General arranged his men on the side of the road, and placing himself at the head of the line instructed them to retain their fire until he gave the signal, which was to be the firing of his own pistol. The signal was given, and immediately three hundred double-barrelled gu
Tyree Springs (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 13
Narrow escape of Gen Morgan. A correspondent of the Atlanta Confederacy writes the following account of a narrow escape from the Yankees, made by the dashing Morgan, and vouches for its truth. We see statements of the same affair in other papers: While Gen. Morgan's command was at Gallatin he received information that a large division of the Abolition army was approaching Nashville by the way of Tyree Springs. He accordingly selected three hundred men from the brigade for the purpose of ambushing them and capturing their wagon train. He arrived at the road just as the head of the Yankee column was approaching, and, selecting a good position, succeeded in pouring a very destructive fire into them. The General arranged his men on the side of the road, and placing himself at the head of the line instructed them to retain their fire until he gave the signal, which was to be the firing of his own pistol. The signal was given, and immediately three hundred double-barrelled g
Gen Morgan (search for this): article 13
Narrow escape of Gen Morgan. A correspondent of the Atlanta Confederacy writes the following account of a narrow escape from the Yankees, made by the dashing Morgan, and vouches for its truth. We see statements of the same affair in other papers: While Gen. Morgan's command was at Gallatin he received information that a large division of the Abolition army was approaching Nashville by the way of Tyree Springs. He accordingly selected three hundred men from the brigade for the purpoor a column of infantry which he was going back to bring up. The officer touched his hat, and immediately gave way, while Morgan rode through their column As he would ride along he would address the stragglers, ordering them to "move up." that they were no better than deserters, and only wanted Morgan to catch them. They would touch their hats and move up briskly. In the meantime the prisoners who were following the General were convulsed with laughter thinking no doubt that he was their priso