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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 23, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 403 total hits in 199 results.

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ur cause is perishing — hope after hope has vanished — and now the only prospect is the very blackness of despair. Here we are reeling back from the third campaign upon Richmond--15,000 of the Grand Army sacrificed at one sweep, and the real escaping only by a hair's breadth." The World says the army will now go into winter quarters, because it can't go anywhere else. A telegram from Cairo says that the iron-clad ram Cairo was blown up, 30 miles from the mouth of the Yazoo, on the 12th, by a rebel torpedo, and sunk in forty feet of water in fifteen minutes. Vessel a total loss. Crew saved. Two other gunboats in the rear escaped. Additional particulars of the battle of Prairie Grove, Ark., show that the Abolition loss in killed and wounded was 995, and the rebel loss 2,700. Several vessels of Banks's fleet put into Hilton Head, short of coal, disabled, &c. The troops on board had suffered much. The Confederate steamer Alabama was heard from on the 28th of No
Latest from the North. further Yankee Accounts of the Fredericksburg battle. We have received Northern papers of the 18th instant. They contain a very interesting account of the battle of Fredericksburg and some highly interesting comments of the press on the same. We give below some extracts from them: An interesting account — a failure Acknowledged. A correspondent of the New York Tribune, under date of " Fredericksburg, December 14th 11 P. M," thus writes: It is no pleasant task to cool ardent hopes-- disappoint high expectations — predict the unfulfilling of fond wishes. Yet stern realities can never be recognized too soon in order to enable us to prepare for their possible consequences; and hence I trust I will not be blamed for the revelation of the discouraging facts pertaining to the condition in which the Army of the Potomac is on this morning, after yesterday's sanguinary, all but fruitless, struggle Undertakings of any kind are measured by the pow
January 19th (search for this): article 2
From North Carolina. Raleigh, December 21. --The business of the Legislature was brought to a close last night until the 19th of January next. The bill to raise ten thousand troops for State defence, from persons liable to conscription, was hotly debated in the Senate on Saturday. Its further consideration was postponed until the 20th of January, by a vote of yeas, 40; nays, 38. Reliable information, last night, represents the Yankees falling back towards Newbern.
January 20th (search for this): article 2
From North Carolina. Raleigh, December 21. --The business of the Legislature was brought to a close last night until the 19th of January next. The bill to raise ten thousand troops for State defence, from persons liable to conscription, was hotly debated in the Senate on Saturday. Its further consideration was postponed until the 20th of January, by a vote of yeas, 40; nays, 38. Reliable information, last night, represents the Yankees falling back towards Newbern.
November 28th (search for this): article 1
mouth of the Yazoo, on the 12th, by a rebel torpedo, and sunk in forty feet of water in fifteen minutes. Vessel a total loss. Crew saved. Two other gunboats in the rear escaped. Additional particulars of the battle of Prairie Grove, Ark., show that the Abolition loss in killed and wounded was 995, and the rebel loss 2,700. Several vessels of Banks's fleet put into Hilton Head, short of coal, disabled, &c. The troops on board had suffered much. The Confederate steamer Alabama was heard from on the 28th of November, when she was at Dominica, West Indies, whether she had gone in pursuit of a schooner which had taken refuge at Dominica. The San Jacinto had been at Point Petre only a few days before, but had sailed for St. Thomas. Gold closed in New York on the 18th at 132½ @ 132¼; Exchange 145½ @ 146½. Congress has appointed a committee, who left Washington Monday for the Rappahannock, to inquire into the facts of the late terrible disaster at Fredericksbur
November 29th (search for this): article 4
under said cartage informing him that the explanations promised in the said letter of General Halleck, of 7th August last, had not yet been received, and that if no answer was sent to the Government within fifteen days from the delivery of this last communication, it would be considered that an answer is declined. And whereas by letter, dated on the 3d day of the present month of December, the said Lt Col Ladlow apprised the said Robert Ould that the above recited communication of 29th of November had been received and forwarded to the Secretary of War of the United States: And whereas this last delay of fifteen days, allowed for answer has elapsed, and no answer has been received: And whereas in addition to the tacit admission resulting from the above refusal to answer, I have received evidence fully establishing the truth of the fact that the said Wm. B, Mumford, a citizen of this Confederacy, was actually and publicly executed in cold blood by hanging, after the occu
ers under the cartel between the two Governments, to Lieut-Colonel W. H. Ludlow, agent of the United States under said cartage informing him that the explanations promised in the said letter of General Halleck, of 7th August last, had not yet been received, and that if no answer was sent to the Government within fifteen days from the delivery of this last communication, it would be considered that an answer is declined. And whereas by letter, dated on the 3d day of the present month of December, the said Lt Col Ladlow apprised the said Robert Ould that the above recited communication of 29th of November had been received and forwarded to the Secretary of War of the United States: And whereas this last delay of fifteen days, allowed for answer has elapsed, and no answer has been received: And whereas in addition to the tacit admission resulting from the above refusal to answer, I have received evidence fully establishing the truth of the fact that the said Wm. B, Mumford,
December 13th (search for this): article 5
it was a defeat? Certainly. If to have started out to accomplish a certain object, and to have failed in doing so, be a defeat, you can apply no other term to the upshot of to day's battle. In spite of all the glosses of official dispatches which you may receive, it seems here to night that we have suffered a defeat. Let us hope that, when fully prepared, the assault may be renewed with new tactical combination, the position carried, and the day retrieved. If it be not so, the 13th day of December must be accounted a black day in the calendar of the Republic. If you are disposed to indulge in criticism on the plan of the battle of Fredericksburg it will not be difficult to point out its great and radical defects.--To have hurled forward masses of men against the fortified works of those terraces was certainly a manifestation of daring, untempered by the slights prudence. Was it not also a fatal error to have risked the whole success of the plan on the accomplishment of a
December 14th (search for this): article 5
Latest from the North. further Yankee Accounts of the Fredericksburg battle. We have received Northern papers of the 18th instant. They contain a very interesting account of the battle of Fredericksburg and some highly interesting comments of the press on the same. We give below some extracts from them: An interesting account — a failure Acknowledged. A correspondent of the New York Tribune, under date of " Fredericksburg, December 14th 11 P. M," thus writes: It is no pleasant task to cool ardent hopes-- disappoint high expectations — predict the unfulfilling of fond wishes. Yet stern realities can never be recognized too soon in order to enable us to prepare for their possible consequences; and hence I trust I will not be blamed for the revelation of the discouraging facts pertaining to the condition in which the Army of the Potomac is on this morning, after yesterday's sanguinary, all but fruitless, struggle Undertakings of any kind are measured by the po
December 21st (search for this): article 2
From North Carolina. Raleigh, December 21. --The business of the Legislature was brought to a close last night until the 19th of January next. The bill to raise ten thousand troops for State defence, from persons liable to conscription, was hotly debated in the Senate on Saturday. Its further consideration was postponed until the 20th of January, by a vote of yeas, 40; nays, 38. Reliable information, last night, represents the Yankees falling back towards Newbern.
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