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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 23, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 12 total hits in 3 results.

West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
Yankee Oppression. A gentleman who has recently been relieved from prison life at Camp Chase, and who is a citizen of Western Virginia, has furnished us one of many incidents in connection with the cruelty practiced by the Yankee hirelings towards the loyal people of the Northwest. In the early part of last summer, a black smith, of Wood county, named McGinness, who was suspected of sympathy with the South, was arrested and taken to Wheeling. A short time previous to his arrest be had lost his wife, and the only remaining members of his family were two little boys, one 9 and the other 12 years old. In the hope that his imprisonment would be of short duration, he requested that his two children might accompany him, which was granted --it would seem only for the purpose of increasing his distress. When they arrived at Wheeling, the whole party, without examination, were thrown into prison — the father in one call and the children in another, without the privilege of communicatin
Wood County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
Yankee Oppression. A gentleman who has recently been relieved from prison life at Camp Chase, and who is a citizen of Western Virginia, has furnished us one of many incidents in connection with the cruelty practiced by the Yankee hirelings towards the loyal people of the Northwest. In the early part of last summer, a black smith, of Wood county, named McGinness, who was suspected of sympathy with the South, was arrested and taken to Wheeling. A short time previous to his arrest be had lost his wife, and the only remaining members of his family were two little boys, one 9 and the other 12 years old. In the hope that his imprisonment would be of short duration, he requested that his two children might accompany him, which was granted --it would seem only for the purpose of increasing his distress. When they arrived at Wheeling, the whole party, without examination, were thrown into prison — the father in one call and the children in another, without the privilege of communicati
Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
h the cruelty practiced by the Yankee hirelings towards the loyal people of the Northwest. In the early part of last summer, a black smith, of Wood county, named McGinness, who was suspected of sympathy with the South, was arrested and taken to Wheeling. A short time previous to his arrest be had lost his wife, and the only remaining members of his family were two little boys, one 9 and the other 12 years old. In the hope that his imprisonment would be of short duration, he requested that his two children might accompany him, which was granted --it would seem only for the purpose of increasing his distress. When they arrived at Wheeling, the whole party, without examination, were thrown into prison — the father in one call and the children in another, without the privilege of communicating with each other in any way. After remaining at Whealing for several weeks they were transferred to Camp Chase, where the some cruelty and retentions rigor was visited upon them. The most touching