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Latest from the North. further Yankee Accounts of the Fredericksburg battle. We have received Northern papers of the 18th instant. They contain a very interesting account of the battle of Fredericksburg and some highly interesting comments of the press on the same. We give below some extracts from them: An interesting account — a failure Acknowledged. A correspondent of the New York Tribune, under date of " Fredericksburg, December 14th 11 P. M," thus writes: It is no pleasant task to cool ardent hopes-- disappoint high expectations — predict the unfulfilling of fond wishes. Yet stern realities can never be recognized too soon in order to enable us to prepare for their possible consequences; and hence I trust I will not be blamed for the revelation of the discouraging facts pertaining to the condition in which the Army of the Potomac is on this morning, after yesterday's sanguinary, all but fruitless, struggle Undertakings of any kind are measured by the pow
December 13th (search for this): article 5
it was a defeat? Certainly. If to have started out to accomplish a certain object, and to have failed in doing so, be a defeat, you can apply no other term to the upshot of to day's battle. In spite of all the glosses of official dispatches which you may receive, it seems here to night that we have suffered a defeat. Let us hope that, when fully prepared, the assault may be renewed with new tactical combination, the position carried, and the day retrieved. If it be not so, the 13th day of December must be accounted a black day in the calendar of the Republic. If you are disposed to indulge in criticism on the plan of the battle of Fredericksburg it will not be difficult to point out its great and radical defects.--To have hurled forward masses of men against the fortified works of those terraces was certainly a manifestation of daring, untempered by the slights prudence. Was it not also a fatal error to have risked the whole success of the plan on the accomplishment of a
December 14th (search for this): article 5
Latest from the North. further Yankee Accounts of the Fredericksburg battle. We have received Northern papers of the 18th instant. They contain a very interesting account of the battle of Fredericksburg and some highly interesting comments of the press on the same. We give below some extracts from them: An interesting account — a failure Acknowledged. A correspondent of the New York Tribune, under date of " Fredericksburg, December 14th 11 P. M," thus writes: It is no pleasant task to cool ardent hopes-- disappoint high expectations — predict the unfulfilling of fond wishes. Yet stern realities can never be recognized too soon in order to enable us to prepare for their possible consequences; and hence I trust I will not be blamed for the revelation of the discouraging facts pertaining to the condition in which the Army of the Potomac is on this morning, after yesterday's sanguinary, all but fruitless, struggle Undertakings of any kind are measured by the po
December 16th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 5
is cold to-day, with a Northeast wind. Last night the enemy increased their entrenchments on the hills in rear of Fredericksburg and threw up rifle pits near the river on the left of the city. To-day their battalion drills are visible to the naked eye on the plain. No movement of importance has taken place to-day. Our troops are in excellent condition, and as enthusiastic as previous to the last engagement. The Second report of Burnside. Headq's Army of the Potomac, December 16, 1862. 6 o'clock P. M. Major-General Halleck. The army was withdrawn to this side of the river because I felt the position in front could not be carried, and it was a military necessity either to attack or retire. A repulse would have been disastrous to us. The army was withdrawn at night, without the knowledge of the enemy, and without loss either of property or men. A. E. Burnside, Major General Commanding. Gen. Burnside, with military frankness and brevity, explains the reas
December 17th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 5
t. The line of the river is, however, entirely too long to be guarded against enterprising attacks, and with the proper dispositions their position can readily by flanked. The situation of our army, however, in cheval of a river — is a perilous one--one of the most demoralizing known; and it may be the dictate of prudence to withdraw the army as soon as possible to the North bank of the Rappahannock. Particulars of the crossing of the Rappahannock. Headq's Army of the Potomac, December 17, 1862. Yesterday morning, when daylight appeared, the enemy seemed to be, as they no doubt were, perfectly astonished that our army had succeeded in returning to this side of the Rappahannock. We returned, as already stated, without losing a single man or a gun in the retrograde movement. A few soldiers who had straggled off made their appearance on the river bank after the pontoon bridges had been removed, but they were brought over in small boats, and a few cavalrymen who were guard
ry; Gen. Jackson, of the Pennsylvania Reserves; Col. Zinn, 132d Pennsylvania; Lt-Col. Dickinson, 4th U. S. artillery; Lt. Col. Curtis, 4th Rhode Island; Lt. Col. Sayles, 7th Rhode Island; Major Horgan, 88th New York: Capt. Kelly, 14th Indiana, and Capt Meagher, 7th New York. Amongst the wounded are the names of Gens. Vinton, Gibbon, Kimball, Caldwell, and Campbell none of them dangerously. Cols Sinclair, 5th Pa; N H Nugent, 69th N Y; Wiseman, 28th N J; Snyder, 7th Va; Miles, 61st N Y; Andrews, 1st Delaware; McGregor, 10th Mass; Hatch, 4th N J. Lt. Cols Geo Dane, 6th Pa; Goodman, 4th Ohio. Majors Goebel, 7th New York; C. C Knight, L19th Pennsylvania; Jennings, 26th New York; O'Nell, 63d New York. Bardwell, of Pennsylvania; Cavanaugh, 69th New York; Philbrook, 16th Massachuset is. Captains Cameroon, 9th New York; Carpenter, 91st New York; Hart, Assistant Adjutant General to Gen. Tyler; Andrew Mahoney. 19th Massachusetts; M. Dunn, 19th Massachusetts, Hendrickson, 9th Ne
s. In killed, 443; wounded, 3,343; missing, 1,900. There is reason to believe that the greater portion of the wounded are made prisoners. The loss in Gen. Sumner's and Hooker's grand divisions, which made the assault upon the enemy's works, cannot be fully ascertained as yet but sufficient is known to justify the assertion that our loss in killed and wounded will reach ten to twelve thousand in the battle of Saturday. During the flag of truce Gen Stuart, of the rebel army, stated that Banks's expedition had gone South but he did not seem to know exactly where. The entire army is now encamped on the same ground which they previously occupied, and are as comfortable as they can be made in shelter tents. Our army has been considerably reinforced since the battle, and no danger whatever need be apprehended in their present position. It is the opinion of military men that had we even succeeded in taking the first range of works, the opportunity of slaughter by the enemy w
. Kelly, 14th Indiana, and Capt Meagher, 7th New York. Amongst the wounded are the names of Gens. Vinton, Gibbon, Kimball, Caldwell, and Campbell none of them dangerously. Cols Sinclair, 5th Pa; N H Nugent, 69th N Y; Wiseman, 28th N J; Snyder, 7th Va; Miles, 61st N Y; Andrews, 1st Delaware; McGregor, 10th Mass; Hatch, 4th N J. Lt. Cols Geo Dane, 6th Pa; Goodman, 4th Ohio. Majors Goebel, 7th New York; C. C Knight, L19th Pennsylvania; Jennings, 26th New York; O'Nell, 63d New York. Bardwell, of Pennsylvania; Cavanaugh, 69th New York; Philbrook, 16th Massachuset is. Captains Cameroon, 9th New York; Carpenter, 91st New York; Hart, Assistant Adjutant General to Gen. Tyler; Andrew Mahoney. 19th Massachusetts; M. Dunn, 19th Massachusetts, Hendrickson, 9th New York, G. G. Weymonth and J. R. Smith, 136th Pennsylvania; Slater, 15th N York; Leddy, 69th New York; Houghton; 14th Indiana; Burke, 88th New York; Donnovan, 69th New York; Cartwright, 63d New York. Our total loss in
thought of. An attempt to retreat to this side of the river by the precarious means of passage, over a few frail bridges, would undoubtedly bring the victorious hosts of the enemy at once to the attack, and might result in the worst calamity of the war. How the army is to be extricated from these predicaments, I am unable to devise. I trust that those entrusted with its fortunes have the ability to do it. Among the officers reported as killed at the battle of Fredericksburg are Gen. Bayard, of the cavalry; Gen. Jackson, of the Pennsylvania Reserves; Col. Zinn, 132d Pennsylvania; Lt-Col. Dickinson, 4th U. S. artillery; Lt. Col. Curtis, 4th Rhode Island; Lt. Col. Sayles, 7th Rhode Island; Major Horgan, 88th New York: Capt. Kelly, 14th Indiana, and Capt Meagher, 7th New York. Amongst the wounded are the names of Gens. Vinton, Gibbon, Kimball, Caldwell, and Campbell none of them dangerously. Cols Sinclair, 5th Pa; N H Nugent, 69th N Y; Wiseman, 28th N J; Snyder, 7th Va; M
York; C. C Knight, L19th Pennsylvania; Jennings, 26th New York; O'Nell, 63d New York. Bardwell, of Pennsylvania; Cavanaugh, 69th New York; Philbrook, 16th Massachuset is. Captains Cameroon, 9th New York; Carpenter, 91st New York; Hart, Assistant Adjutant General to Gen. Tyler; Andrew Mahoney. 19th Massachusetts; M. Dunn, 19th Massachusetts, Hendrickson, 9th New York, G. G. Weymonth and J. R. Smith, 136th Pennsylvania; Slater, 15th N York; Leddy, 69th New York; Houghton; 14th Indiana; Burke, 88th New York; Donnovan, 69th New York; Cartwright, 63d New York. Our total loss in officers and men is variously stated at from five to ten thousand. The plan of the battle. A correspondent of the New York Times concludes a description of the battle of Saturday with the following reflections: Shall we say, then it was a defeat? Certainly. If to have started out to accomplish a certain object, and to have failed in doing so, be a defeat, you can apply no other term to th
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