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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 23, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 5
r, 5th Pa; N H Nugent, 69th N Y; Wiseman, 28th N J; Snyder, 7th Va; Miles, 61st N Y; Andrews, 1st Delaware; McGregor, 10th Mass; Hatch, 4th N J. Lt. Cols Geo Dane, 6th Pa; Goodman, 4th Ohio. Majors Goebel, 7th New York; C. C Knight, L19th Pennsylvania; Jennings, 26th New York; O'Nell, 63d New York. Bardwell, of Pennsylvania; Cavanaugh, 69th New York; Philbrook, 16th Massachuset is. Captains Cameroon, 9th New York; Carpenter, 91st New York; Hart, Assistant Adjutant General to Gen. TylePennsylvania; Cavanaugh, 69th New York; Philbrook, 16th Massachuset is. Captains Cameroon, 9th New York; Carpenter, 91st New York; Hart, Assistant Adjutant General to Gen. Tyler; Andrew Mahoney. 19th Massachusetts; M. Dunn, 19th Massachusetts, Hendrickson, 9th New York, G. G. Weymonth and J. R. Smith, 136th Pennsylvania; Slater, 15th N York; Leddy, 69th New York; Houghton; 14th Indiana; Burke, 88th New York; Donnovan, 69th New York; Cartwright, 63d New York. Our total loss in officers and men is variously stated at from five to ten thousand. The plan of the battle. A correspondent of the New York Times concludes a description of the battle of Saturday w
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 5
pon him, but he was only slightly injured, and is still in command of what remains of his brigade. Matters in the West. Dates from Nashville to the 10th show that the dispatches to the press on that day, representing that the rebels had assumed the offensive, were founded upon skirmishing within ten miles of Nashville. Rosecrans, it is asserted, is nearly ready to move upon the enemy. Jeff. Davis and Bishop Polk spoke at Murfreesboro. Friday night, the former declaring that Tennessee should be held at all hazard. Less than forty thousand rebels were between Murfreesboro and Nashville. The rebels have increased their force at Nolensville, Tenn and the Federals are still at Clarksville. Dispatches from Louisville and Evansville represent that a strong rebel cavalry force was marching into Kentucky from Clarksville. It may or may not be so. From Cairo we learn that Gen. Hovey's expedition on the Mississippi has returned to Helena, Arkansas. The results of the ex
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 5
of two acres 250 of our own and the enemy's dead were found." --The death of Gen. Stein, of Missouri, is confirmed. The latest intelligence from the Southwest is to the effect that Hindman, with his forces, was falling back to the vicinity of Little Rock, where a force of some 18,000 men is stationed under the com command of Gen. Holmes. The principal camp is said to be at Austin, 25 miles north of Little Rock. A voyage with rebels — Maury, Ferguson, and others on board the Arabia--WhatLittle Rock. A voyage with rebels — Maury, Ferguson, and others on board the Arabia--What they said and How they looked. A correspondent of the Boston Commercial Bulletin who crossed the Atlantic in the Arabia with the rebel Maury and a dozen of his fellow-traitors, gives the following interesting account of the incidents of the voyage: At Halifax there came on board twelve or thirteen rebels, or Southerners if you please, headed by that arch traitor and scoundrel M. F. Maury, formerly Lieutenant of the United States Navy, and for whom so much was done by our Government fo
Helena, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 5
, the former declaring that Tennessee should be held at all hazard. Less than forty thousand rebels were between Murfreesboro and Nashville. The rebels have increased their force at Nolensville, Tenn and the Federals are still at Clarksville. Dispatches from Louisville and Evansville represent that a strong rebel cavalry force was marching into Kentucky from Clarksville. It may or may not be so. From Cairo we learn that Gen. Hovey's expedition on the Mississippi has returned to Helena, Arkansas. The results of the expedition are one hundred and sixty rebels killed, wounded and captured, and our loss thirty-four killed, wounded and missing. The army of Gen. Sherman has returned to Memphis. The rebel army of Mississippi is said to be between Jackson and Canton. Gen. Grant is still at Oxford with his forces, and an immediate advance is not expected. A party of guerrillas burnt the steamer Lake City at Concordia. Ark, on Monday of last week, and in retaliation a U. S steamer
United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
the raid of Gen. Lee into Maryland was made solely, for the purpose of possessing Harper's Ferry and the stores collected there, and also for the purpose of securing very large supplies of leather that had been collected for them and awaited their coming. He stated that the trains occupied with the transportation of the leather collected extended over a length of forty miles of road. England and America. Conversing about the probabilities of a war between Great Britain and the United States, Maury took especial pains to prove to the Englishmen with whom he was conversing that, in such an event, nothing would be more easy for England to do than to dispatch a fleet of gunboats to the Western lakes, via the Welland Canal, and to destroy all of the leading American cities on the lake shores, and to take possession of a large portion of the West. In answer to this, I will only state that, in case of any such untoward event, I would like to see Maury and his associates placed in
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 5
n the place. A band of rebels, numbering two thousand, was surprised at Tuscumbia, on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, east of Corinth, and completely routed by two regiments of National infantry and one company of cavalry. The St. Louis Republican says dispatches have been received from Gen Herron confirming the magnitude of the battle of Yuille Grove. Gen. H states, that "within the space of two acres 250 of our own and the enemy's dead were found." --The death of Gen. Stein, of Missouri, is confirmed. The latest intelligence from the Southwest is to the effect that Hindman, with his forces, was falling back to the vicinity of Little Rock, where a force of some 18,000 men is stationed under the com command of Gen. Holmes. The principal camp is said to be at Austin, 25 miles north of Little Rock. A voyage with rebels — Maury, Ferguson, and others on board the Arabia--What they said and How they looked. A correspondent of the Boston Commercial Bulletin who crossed
Gibralter (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 5
osure of our own troops. And what a misfortune, equally lamentable, that the approach to the rebel positions back of Fredericksburg was as area so restricted that our field batteries were almost equally useless, owing to the impossibility of manœuvering In the course of this correspondence, from the time of our first occupation of Falmouth; I have informed you of the gradual development of the rebel position, from an absolutely defenceless condition to the time that it became another Gibraltar. Never for a moment did we, who watched this progress, suppose that it would ever be attempted to be taken by hurling masses of men against those works. We had supposed that the resources of strategy would assuredly afford other means of accomplishing the desired end. Regarded as a position of defence, that which the rebel leaders have taken up on the Rappahannock, and which we have been pleased to assail in the manner indicated and with the result known, none could possibly be more
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 5
Government, and that Gen. Lee when he left that city to invade the North, had a force of but fifty-six thousand men, all told. He also stated that the army of the South had always been very much overrated by the North. Lee's Incursion into Maryland. An Englishman on board, who sympathize strongly with the South, told me the other day that the raid of Gen. Lee into Maryland was made solely, for the purpose of possessing Harper's Ferry and the stores collected there, and also for the purMaryland was made solely, for the purpose of possessing Harper's Ferry and the stores collected there, and also for the purpose of securing very large supplies of leather that had been collected for them and awaited their coming. He stated that the trains occupied with the transportation of the leather collected extended over a length of forty miles of road. England and America. Conversing about the probabilities of a war between Great Britain and the United States, Maury took especial pains to prove to the Englishmen with whom he was conversing that, in such an event, nothing would be more easy for Englan
Austin (Texas, United States) (search for this): article 5
received from Gen Herron confirming the magnitude of the battle of Yuille Grove. Gen. H states, that "within the space of two acres 250 of our own and the enemy's dead were found." --The death of Gen. Stein, of Missouri, is confirmed. The latest intelligence from the Southwest is to the effect that Hindman, with his forces, was falling back to the vicinity of Little Rock, where a force of some 18,000 men is stationed under the com command of Gen. Holmes. The principal camp is said to be at Austin, 25 miles north of Little Rock. A voyage with rebels — Maury, Ferguson, and others on board the Arabia--What they said and How they looked. A correspondent of the Boston Commercial Bulletin who crossed the Atlantic in the Arabia with the rebel Maury and a dozen of his fellow-traitors, gives the following interesting account of the incidents of the voyage: At Halifax there came on board twelve or thirteen rebels, or Southerners if you please, headed by that arch traitor and sco
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 5
me the other day that the raid of Gen. Lee into Maryland was made solely, for the purpose of possessing Harper's Ferry and the stores collected there, and also for the purpose of securing very large supplies of leather that had been collected for them and awaited their coming. He stated that the trains occupied with the transportation of the leather collected extended over a length of forty miles of road. England and America. Conversing about the probabilities of a war between Great Britain and the United States, Maury took especial pains to prove to the Englishmen with whom he was conversing that, in such an event, nothing would be more easy for England to do than to dispatch a fleet of gunboats to the Western lakes, via the Welland Canal, and to destroy all of the leading American cities on the lake shores, and to take possession of a large portion of the West. In answer to this, I will only state that, in case of any such untoward event, I would like to see Maury and hi
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