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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 24, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 10 total hits in 4 results.

Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 4
Singular Narrative. The Chicago Times, of a recent date publishes a long letter over the signature of J. Wesley Green, an ornamental painter of Pittsburg, Pa., in which the professes to have been the bearer of peace propositions from President Davis to the Yankee Government at Washington. He says that the reason of his selection for this service by the Southern President, was because of an acquaintance formed with the latter during the war with Mexico. He gives a full account of his interview with President Davis and says that during the interview he was rested most cordially. It seems, however, that Mr. J. Wesley Green has not sustained a very reputable character at home, as he has not long been out of the Penitentiary, where he served a three years term.
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): article 4
Singular Narrative. The Chicago Times, of a recent date publishes a long letter over the signature of J. Wesley Green, an ornamental painter of Pittsburg, Pa., in which the professes to have been the bearer of peace propositions from President Davis to the Yankee Government at Washington. He says that the reason of his selection for this service by the Southern President, was because of an acquaintance formed with the latter during the war with Mexico. He gives a full account of his interview with President Davis and says that during the interview he was rested most cordially. It seems, however, that Mr. J. Wesley Green has not sustained a very reputable character at home, as he has not long been out of the Penitentiary, where he served a three years term.
J. Wesley Green (search for this): article 4
Singular Narrative. The Chicago Times, of a recent date publishes a long letter over the signature of J. Wesley Green, an ornamental painter of Pittsburg, Pa., in which the professes to have been the bearer of peace propositions from President Davis to the Yankee Government at Washington. He says that the reason of his selection for this service by the Southern President, was because of an acquaintance formed with the latter during the war with Mexico. He gives a full account of his intnt at Washington. He says that the reason of his selection for this service by the Southern President, was because of an acquaintance formed with the latter during the war with Mexico. He gives a full account of his interview with President Davis and says that during the interview he was rested most cordially. It seems, however, that Mr. J. Wesley Green has not sustained a very reputable character at home, as he has not long been out of the Penitentiary, where he served a three years term.
Charles Davis (search for this): article 4
Singular Narrative. The Chicago Times, of a recent date publishes a long letter over the signature of J. Wesley Green, an ornamental painter of Pittsburg, Pa., in which the professes to have been the bearer of peace propositions from President Davis to the Yankee Government at Washington. He says that the reason of his selection for this service by the Southern President, was because of an acquaintance formed with the latter during the war with Mexico. He gives a full account of his intnt at Washington. He says that the reason of his selection for this service by the Southern President, was because of an acquaintance formed with the latter during the war with Mexico. He gives a full account of his interview with President Davis and says that during the interview he was rested most cordially. It seems, however, that Mr. J. Wesley Green has not sustained a very reputable character at home, as he has not long been out of the Penitentiary, where he served a three years term.