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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 833 total hits in 378 results.

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Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
orn was delivered to me for safekeeping by Conductor W. R. Taylor last Saturday --Davy says he belongs to Joe Wright, of Pittsylvania county, about 30 miles from Danville, and was on his way to wait on his young who Lieutenant in Gen. Wise's Brigade. The owner will please come forward prove property, pay charges, and take his s miles from Danville, and was on his way to wait on his young who Lieutenant in Gen. Wise's Brigade. The owner will please come forward prove property, pay charges, and take his servant. Apply to F. J. Sampson, Agt., Richmond and Danville R. E. Danville papers please copy and him to me immediately. de 15-- miles from Danville, and was on his way to wait on his young who Lieutenant in Gen. Wise's Brigade. The owner will please come forward prove property, pay charges, and take his servant. Apply to F. J. Sampson, Agt., Richmond and Danville R. E. Danville papers please copy and him to me immediately. de 15--
Pittsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Lost negro man found --Davy, a tall, black, negro man, with short and moustache, and clothed in about half worn was delivered to me for safekeeping by Conductor W. R. Taylor last Saturday --Davy says he belongs to Joe Wright, of Pittsylvania county, about 30 miles from Danville, and was on his way to wait on his young who Lieutenant in Gen. Wise's Brigade. The owner will please come forward prove property, pay charges, and take his servant. Apply to F. J. Sampson, Agt., Richmond and Danville R. E. Danville papers please copy and him to me immediately. de 15--
Jefferson Davis (search for this): article 1
with its spirits, and its chief never appear in public except surrounded by guards. But what a contrast to the Southern President to him whom the impudent varlets of the Northern press presume to call a military despot! The Republican simplicity and unaffected dignity of the early Presidents of the United States can now be found alone in that country to which the genius of Liberty has fled from the North, and which still preserves unimpaired the principles of constitutional freedom. President Davis dwells in a modest mansion, undefended by a single soldier, and goes forth upon his daily duties with as little state as any private citizen. Not a solitary guard attends him, and no stranger who meets him would imagine that the plain and unpretending gentleman was the President of the Confederate States. The President of the Southern Confederacy is too strong in the affections of the people to require an armed guard, and too much of a Republican and a gentleman to ape the vulgar stat
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 1
Two remarkable contrasts. A Washington correspondent of a Chicago paper gives a graphic account of the manner in which his august Excellency, President Lincoln, goes forth from the White House. His carriage, while awaiting him at the gate of the palace, is surrounded by fierce looking guards, and when he enters it and proceeds to take his air, a body of cavalry, armed to the teeth, ride before, and behind, and both sides the Presidential carriage. It is in the style of Eastern despots tentleman was the President of the Confederate States. The President of the Southern Confederacy is too strong in the affections of the people to require an armed guard, and too much of a Republican and a gentleman to ape the vulgar state of Abraham Lincoln.--We are willing to put the two Presidents side by side, and let the world judge the people by their representative men. Another of the remarkable and suggestive contrasts of the times is that furnished by the recent battles before Rich
McClellan (search for this): article 1
ts side by side, and let the world judge the people by their representative men. Another of the remarkable and suggestive contrasts of the times is that furnished by the recent battles before Richmond and Fredericksburg. The Yankees, under the leadership of a General whose forte is clicking and digging, sat down before Richmond in tremendous force, and for two whole months were engaged in constructing a chain of fortifications, the most powerful and complete known in modern warfare. McClellan, with the resources of a nation and a world at his back, and the most unlimited supply of men and means, taxed his engineering skill to the utmost to construct works about Richmond which should be perfectly impregnable, and should make a sure thing of the "doomed city." Everything was at stake; the fate of his country, and his own reputation, which was to him even more valuable. He believed in fortifications, and had deliberately selected that mode of capturing Richmond in preference to a
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
pt surrounded by guards. But what a contrast to the Southern President to him whom the impudent varlets of the Northern press presume to call a military despot! The Republican simplicity and unaffected dignity of the early Presidents of the United States can now be found alone in that country to which the genius of Liberty has fled from the North, and which still preserves unimpaired the principles of constitutional freedom. President Davis dwells in a modest mansion, undefended by a single soldier, and goes forth upon his daily duties with as little state as any private citizen. Not a solitary guard attends him, and no stranger who meets him would imagine that the plain and unpretending gentleman was the President of the Confederate States. The President of the Southern Confederacy is too strong in the affections of the people to require an armed guard, and too much of a Republican and a gentleman to ape the vulgar state of Abraham Lincoln.--We are willing to put the two Preside
Gibralter (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
upply of men and means, taxed his engineering skill to the utmost to construct works about Richmond which should be perfectly impregnable, and should make a sure thing of the "doomed city." Everything was at stake; the fate of his country, and his own reputation, which was to him even more valuable. He believed in fortifications, and had deliberately selected that mode of capturing Richmond in preference to a fair fight in the open field. Of course he encircled this city with a series of Gibraltar. And yet, with two months preparations, with heavy guns in addition to his field artillery, with odds of two to one against us, his fortifications were swept away by the assault of Southern soldiers like chaff before the whirlwind and the braggart pretender and his legions driven like yelping hounds for thirty miles to the shelter of their gun boats. What a contrast did the Rappahannock present to the scenes about Richmond. The cases were now reversed, the Southern troops had the advant
Hiram Oliver (search for this): article 1
Severely burned. --Yesterday morning, about 10 o'clock, a negro woman, the property of Hiram Oliver, on 18th street, was severely burned by her clothes taking fire from a lighted pipe which she had placed in the pocket of her dress. As soon as she discovered that her clothing was on fire she ran but into the street, when her whole person appeared to be in a light blaze. Speedy assistance was rendered her, and the fire extinguished; not, how ever, until she was very seriously burned.
J. R. Anderson (search for this): article 1
To owners of slaves or their Agents. --We take this method of saying to those of whom we have hired negroes the past year, and upon whom we are unable to call, that if they will return their hands to any of our furnaces, or to these works, we will allow them the highest market rates for such hands the evening year. J. R. Anderson & co. Tredegar Iron Works, Richmond, Dec. 25, 1862. de 27--1w
December 25th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
To owners of slaves or their Agents. --We take this method of saying to those of whom we have hired negroes the past year, and upon whom we are unable to call, that if they will return their hands to any of our furnaces, or to these works, we will allow them the highest market rates for such hands the evening year. J. R. Anderson & co. Tredegar Iron Works, Richmond, Dec. 25, 1862. de 27--1w
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