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Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): article 16
t interests involved, be set apart and reserved for the support and compensation of labor. The war is not waged by the Government for the overthrow of slavery. The President has declared, on the contrary, that it is to restore the "Constitutional relation between the United States and each of the States" in which that relation is or may be suspended. The resolutions passed by Congress, before the war, with almost unanimous consent, recognized the rights of the States in this regard. Vermont has recently repealed the statutes supposed to be inconsistent therewith. Massachusetts had done so before. Slavery existed by consent and constitutional guaranty; violence and war will inevitably bring it to an end. It is impossible that any military man, in the event of continued war, should counsel the preservation of slave property in the rebel States. If it is to be preserved, war must cease, and the former Constitutional relations be again established. The first gun at Sumter
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): article 16
ppeared to you twice to act with me. You refused. My necessities will brook of no more delay. I recognize the Southern Confederacy My people are starving. I must have cotton." Our blockades will be broken after a short pause, allowing time for England to follow the example France will have set her. It is for this purpose — the breaking of the blockade — that France has several of her tremendously powerful plated frigates in our waters. She had no need of them for the inland expedition to Mexico. She well knew that, as the Mexicans have no navy, her armored vessels were of no use in the Gulf, save as regards any emergencies which might arise in case of a recognition by France of the Davis Government. We must not expect that fear of the consequences will deter France from an alliance with the Southern Confederacy. We have, up to the present moment, proved incapable of putting down the rebellion, and, as a natural consequence, Napoleon will feel assured that, strengthened by hi
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 16
of Saturday are confused and contradictory, and we have nothing later from our special correspondent than his account of Friday's battle. We trust and pray that the dispatch purporting to come from the post-commander at Nashville, announcing our troops victorious on Saturday, and south of Murfreesboro', in pursuit of the enemy, will turn out true. In that event the news of the destruction of the bridges on the Tennessee and East Virginia railroad, by an incursion of our cavalry from Southern Kentucky, just confirmed from rebel sources, will render the ultimate chances for the escape of Bragg's army from destruction very slim. Our correspondent puts our loss in killed and wounded in the three battles of Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday at the comparatively low figure of 4,000. The number of officers seems to have been disproportionately large. One general officer and 11 Colonels are reported killed, and six general officers and four Colonels wounded. Many staff and artillery
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 16
en the names of Washington, Jackson, and Taylor are breathed with as deep a reverence as on the James or the Mississippi. Let us fulfill the condition of this last great trial, and become a nation — a grand nation — with sense enough to govern ourselves and strength enough to stand against the world united. N. P. Banks, Major General Commanding. A "Herald" opinion about French intervention — Fears of France going it alone. There is evidently some alarm among the Yankees about Napoleon's intentions relative to intervention. The New York Herald has an article which is a sample straw of the mass of the conjectures now finding utterance in the Northern papers. It says: The Asia arrived yesterday, with three days later news from Europe. We learn that the Emperor of the French will address another circular to the Courts of England and Russia upon the necessity of immediate mediation or intervention in the affairs of this country. We are not inclined to believe that e<
France (France) (search for this): article 16
trengthens and consolidates brotherly affection. Rugland, France, Austria, Italy--every land fertile enough to make a histo A "Herald" opinion about French intervention — Fears of France going it alone. There is evidently some alarm among th It is, we fear, the last move before the recognition, by France alone, of the Davis Government. --Napoleon will say: "I ap is for this purpose — the breaking of the blockade — that France has several of her tremendously powerful plated frigates i emergencies which might arise in case of a recognition by France of the Davis Government. We must not expect that fear of the consequences will deter France from an alliance with the Southern Confederacy. We have, up to the present moment, ppation decree will not prove to her the bugbear it will to France and England. She has just set the example of an extended Lincoln's decree. Be that as it may, we are assured that France and England will deem it a fearful blow at their commerce,<
Mount Sterling, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 16
issued a circular letter to the members of the Legislature, asking for their views on the President's emancipation proclamation; and the answers received indicate that fully two-thirds are in favor of taking the State out of the Union if the proclamation is enforced. The Legislature will meet on Monday, and it is said that Gov. Robinson's message will urge a separation. The correspondent says the State militia will go with the South, and that Humphrey Marshall has stationed himself at Mount Sterling to receive them. The New York Herald considers Lincoln's pronunci unnecessary, unwise, and timed, impracticable, outside of the Constitution, and full of mischief," but hopes that it will prove nothing worse than a nullity and a harmless tub to the Abolition whale. Administrative view of what Seymour, of New York, is doing. The Washington Chronicle, of the 5th, has an editorial upon the proposed removal of the New York Police Commissioners, in which it says: "The appar
United States (United States) (search for this): article 16
interest, official publication is herewith made of the proclamation by the President of the United States relating to the subject of the emancipation. In the examination of this document it will bevailing testimony, that such State, and the people thereof, are not in rebellion against the United States. III. That the State of Louisiana has not yet been designated by the President as in reband the compensation of all citizens who have remained loyal, "for all losses by acts of the United States, including slaves," are among the chief recommendations of this important paper. It is eceived unnecessarily in their camps. These regulations enforced with all the troops of the United States in the localities where they are enlisted, are now imperatively necessary. These troops wilas declared, on the contrary, that it is to restore the "Constitutional relation between the United States and each of the States" in which that relation is or may be suspended. The resolutions pass
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 16
bor. The war is not waged by the Government for the overthrow of slavery. The President has declared, on the contrary, that it is to restore the "Constitutional relation between the United States and each of the States" in which that relation is or may be suspended. The resolutions passed by Congress, before the war, with almost unanimous consent, recognized the rights of the States in this regard. Vermont has recently repealed the statutes supposed to be inconsistent therewith. Massachusetts had done so before. Slavery existed by consent and constitutional guaranty; violence and war will inevitably bring it to an end. It is impossible that any military man, in the event of continued war, should counsel the preservation of slave property in the rebel States. If it is to be preserved, war must cease, and the former Constitutional relations be again established. The first gun at Sumter proclaimed emancipation. The continuance of the contest, there commenced, will consum
Yazoo River (United States) (search for this): article 16
Late Northern news. From our files of Northern papers, of the 5th, we make up the following summary: A Splendid Yankee victory — the "First Crest of Hills" at Vicksburg captured. The Northern papers, of the 5th, publish dispatches from Gen. Sherman, dated the 27th, showing that his great expedition had stormed the Confederate works near Vicksburg with complete success. Here is the statement: Gen. Sherman debarked his forces on the left bank of the Yazoo river, ten miles above its mouth, and forming in line of battle advanced toward Vicksburg. After passing beyond the reach of the fire of the rebel gunboats, Gen. Sherman encountered the enemy in force. A terrific conflict ensued, lasting five hours. The enemy were driven back beyond two bayous that girt the rear of Vicksburg, and from their entrenched works on the hill by shells. On Saturday night the two armies lay on their arms with the two bayous intervening. During the night pontoons were constructed, notwi
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 16
d glorious Union There is not a moment to be lost. Let our immense resources be fully developed, and, above all, let party squabbles and the intrigues of politicians cease in this the moment of great danger to our beloved country. There must now be a united movement. We must prepare to sustain, at all perils, the integrity of our Republic. Further particulars of the battle of Murfreesboro'. The New York Tribune, of the 5th, has an account of what it terms a "week's fighting in Tennessee." This account says that "at the close of Wednesday's battle the rebels occupied the ground held by our forces in the morning, had captured twenty-six and disabled six pieces of our artillery, and taken several thousand prisoners. They could then fairly claim a victory." The account continues: The doubling of our right on the centre, with the consequent disarrangement of the entire line, and mixing up of the different portions of the army, together with the total disorganization of a
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