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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 15, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 1
tice of the enemy's arrival, failed to do so, and ere his guns could be loaded and discharged three times, the rebel bayonets had swept away his men, and he himself fell wounded and bleeding into the hands of the foe. The gallant and earnest Captain Simonson fought like a hero as he is, and brought off all but two of his guns. Capt. Goodspeed strenuously endeavored, after firing several rounds, to save his cannon, but could only succeed in getting away with two of them. Gen. Kirk, of Illinois, commanding one of the brigades in Johnson's division, was severely wounded while endeavoring to rally his regiment. The enemy succeeded in getting the right flank completely hemmed in. A large number of officers of every grade were shot down while standing almost at the muzzles of the rebel muskets. The brigades and regiments rushed upon one another in disgraceful disorder, and the rout of the division became irretrievable. I suppose I shall raise a storm about my head for sayin
Perrysville (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 1
hnson's division immediately broke, almost indeed before they had taken their arms from the stack, and one of the batteries (Edgerton's) was taken before it fired the third round. Poor Edgerton! It was not his fault. A ters better, braver young man, is seldom found than lie. It was his greatest ambition to take part in a battle; and I remember well how often and how earnestly he deplored that separation from the old 3d division, which prevented him from taking part in the battle of Perrysville. His hour came at last. It found him ready; but those upon whom he had a right to rely to give him timely notice of the enemy's arrival, failed to do so, and ere his guns could be loaded and discharged three times, the rebel bayonets had swept away his men, and he himself fell wounded and bleeding into the hands of the foe. The gallant and earnest Captain Simonson fought like a hero as he is, and brought off all but two of his guns. Capt. Goodspeed strenuously endeavored, afte
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
A graphic description of the Yankee rout at Murfreesborough.the final repulse of the rebels! A Yankee correspondent writing from the battle field of Murfreesboro, gives a most graphic description of the slaughter of the Federal soldiers there, and the irresistible charge of the Confederates. We give it in full: The sun had not yet risen on Wednesday morning when the firing commenced upon the right. The First Missouri Battery, Captain Eessock, and the First Illinois, Capt. Houghtain, shelled the rebels out of a point of woods in front of Sheridan's division, which now slightly advanced the enemy threw himself upon Sheridan with terrible energy, but was thrice repulsed. Again he advanced, with larger numbers and greater desperation than before, and Sheridan's men were compelled to give ground.--It was only for a moment, however. The brave and noble Sill, assisted by other daring officers, soon rallied the retiring troops. The flashing banner of the Stars once more ad
Waterloo, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 1
t in the woods. No one knows exactly what command there was. A shout, a charge, a rush of fire, a recoil, and then all for a time disappeared. For ten minutes the thunder of the battle burst forth from the cloud. When our battalions advanced they found no rebels between the woods and turnpike, except the dead, the dying, and the disabled. There were hundreds of these, and their blood soaked into and reddened the ground. Since the annihilation of the Old Guard in their charge at Waterloo, there has probably not been an instance of so great a slaughter in so short a time as during the repulse of the rebel left at Murfreesboro', and it will hereafter be celebrated in history as much as is the fierce combat which crushed forever the power and prospects of Napoleon. The rebel left was now thoroughly repulsed, and our troops, emboldened by their success, pushed after them into the woods, driving them back in turn over a considerable portion of the ground which we at first o
Colonel Loomis was there with his immortal First Michigan Battery, and there was stokes with the guns and equipments furnished by the Chicago Board of Trade, and Mendenhall and Gunther, with their regular artillery, and the troops led by General Wood, comprising some of the finest in the service, and the three famous brigades belonging to the old Third division. The Ninth, the Seventeenth and the Regulars, which the daring valor of Rosecrans, assisted by the unflinching courage of Colonel Scribner, of the Thirty-eighth Indians, commanding the Ninth Brigade, and by the splendid abilities of Colonel John Beatty; of the Third Ohio, commanding the Seventeenth, had extricated from the woods, into which they had been sent to check the progress of the enemy, in a comparatively unbroken and undemoralized condition, a result which to one who knows something of the nature of that fearful combat in the woods seems little short of miraculous. Other illustrious corps were there also, who
Goodspeed (search for this): article 1
m taking part in the battle of Perrysville. His hour came at last. It found him ready; but those upon whom he had a right to rely to give him timely notice of the enemy's arrival, failed to do so, and ere his guns could be loaded and discharged three times, the rebel bayonets had swept away his men, and he himself fell wounded and bleeding into the hands of the foe. The gallant and earnest Captain Simonson fought like a hero as he is, and brought off all but two of his guns. Capt. Goodspeed strenuously endeavored, after firing several rounds, to save his cannon, but could only succeed in getting away with two of them. Gen. Kirk, of Illinois, commanding one of the brigades in Johnson's division, was severely wounded while endeavoring to rally his regiment. The enemy succeeded in getting the right flank completely hemmed in. A large number of officers of every grade were shot down while standing almost at the muzzles of the rebel muskets. The brigades and regiments ru
standing almost at the muzzles of the rebel muskets. The brigades and regiments rushed upon one another in disgraceful disorder, and the rout of the division became irretrievable. I suppose I shall raise a storm about my head for saying so, but I can't, from all that I have heard, come to any other conclusion than that the right wing of the army was completely surprised, and that, too, under circumstances which should have rendered it particularly careful and vigilant. Whether General McCook or General Johnson is to blame, this impartial investigation will hereafter determine. At present the sentiment of the entire army is extremely hostile to both, and I imagine it will not be many days before there are important changes in leadership of the fourteenth army corps. Brigade after brigade, battery after battery, from Palmer's, Negley's, and Roussean's divisions were sent into the midst of the thickets to cheek the progress of the foe and rally the fugitives, but all in t
completely surprised, and that, too, under circumstances which should have rendered it particularly careful and vigilant. Whether General McCook or General Johnson is to blame, this impartial investigation will hereafter determine. At present the sentiment of the entire army is extremely hostile to both, and I imagine it will not be many days before there are important changes in leadership of the fourteenth army corps. Brigade after brigade, battery after battery, from Palmer's, Negley's, and Roussean's divisions were sent into the midst of the thickets to cheek the progress of the foe and rally the fugitives, but all in turn were either crushed by the flying crowds, broken by the impetuosity of the foe, and put to confused flight, or compelled to retire and extricate themselves in the best manner that seemed to offer. The history of the combat in those dark cedar thickets will never be known. No man could see even the whole of his regiment, and no one will ever be a
prised, and that, too, under circumstances which should have rendered it particularly careful and vigilant. Whether General McCook or General Johnson is to blame, this impartial investigation will hereafter determine. At present the sentiment of the entire army is extremely hostile to both, and I imagine it will not be many days before there are important changes in leadership of the fourteenth army corps. Brigade after brigade, battery after battery, from Palmer's, Negley's, and Roussean's divisions were sent into the midst of the thickets to cheek the progress of the foe and rally the fugitives, but all in turn were either crushed by the flying crowds, broken by the impetuosity of the foe, and put to confused flight, or compelled to retire and extricate themselves in the best manner that seemed to offer. The history of the combat in those dark cedar thickets will never be known. No man could see even the whole of his regiment, and no one will ever be able to tell who
e army was completely surprised, and that, too, under circumstances which should have rendered it particularly careful and vigilant. Whether General McCook or General Johnson is to blame, this impartial investigation will hereafter determine. At present the sentiment of the entire army is extremely hostile to both, and I imagine it will not be many days before there are important changes in leadership of the fourteenth army corps. Brigade after brigade, battery after battery, from Palmer's, Negley's, and Roussean's divisions were sent into the midst of the thickets to cheek the progress of the foe and rally the fugitives, but all in turn were either crushed by the flying crowds, broken by the impetuosity of the foe, and put to confused flight, or compelled to retire and extricate themselves in the best manner that seemed to offer. The history of the combat in those dark cedar thickets will never be known. No man could see even the whole of his regiment, and no one will
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