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ntion to American affairs. It has a very excellent cut representing Jeff. Davis and Lincoln at a game of cards, on a barrel of gunpowder. Old Abe, with furious aspect and hair erect like the quills of the fretful porcupine, has his last card — the black ace — raised on high, whilst Jeff, with elbow on the board and the corner of his card resting on his nose, gives his antagonist a most wicked leer from under the front-piece of his cap, appearing to say. Play on, old fellow: the last card can't help you out of the scrape. Another cut represents Old Abe's perplexity with the negro. He is seated in a room of the White House, with his hands resting on his knees, and a most woe-begone expression on his face, whilst a big buck negro, in his shirt sleeves and barefoot, with arms folded, head thrown back, and one foot on the table, in close proximity to Abraham's nose, interrogates him as follows:"Now, den, Messrs. Jonathan, what you goin' to do wid dis child? Eh!"--Savannah Republica
Jefferson Davis (search for this): article 3
"Punch" on the war. --Through the kindness of some unknown friend we are in possession of a copy of the London Punch, which gives its accustomed attention to American affairs. It has a very excellent cut representing Jeff. Davis and Lincoln at a game of cards, on a barrel of gunpowder. Old Abe, with furious aspect and hair erect like the quills of the fretful porcupine, has his last card — the black ace — raised on high, whilst Jeff, with elbow on the board and the corner of his card resting on his nose, gives his antagonist a most wicked leer from under the front-piece of his cap, appearing to say. Play on, old fellow: the last card can't help you out of the scrape. Another cut represents Old Abe's perplexity with the negro. He is seated in a room of the White House, with his hands resting on his knees, and a most woe-begone expression on his face, whilst a big buck negro, in his shirt sleeves and barefoot, with arms folded, head thrown back, and one foot on the table, in c
"Punch" on the war. --Through the kindness of some unknown friend we are in possession of a copy of the London Punch, which gives its accustomed attention to American affairs. It has a very excellent cut representing Jeff. Davis and Lincoln at a game of cards, on a barrel of gunpowder. Old Abe, with furious aspect and hair erect like the quills of the fretful porcupine, has his last card — the black ace — raised on high, whilst Jeff, with elbow on the board and the corner of his card resting on his nose, gives his antagonist a most wicked leer from under the front-piece of his cap, appearing to say. Play on, old fellow: the last card can't help you out of the scrape. Another cut represents Old Abe's perplexity with the negro. He is seated in a room of the White House, with his hands resting on his knees, and a most woe-begone expression on his face, whilst a big buck negro, in his shirt sleeves and barefoot, with arms folded, head thrown back, and one foot on the table, in cl
"Punch" on the war. --Through the kindness of some unknown friend we are in possession of a copy of the London Punch, which gives its accustomed attention to American affairs. It has a very excellent cut representing Jeff. Davis and Lincoln at a game of cards, on a barrel of gunpowder. Old Abe, with furious aspect and hair erect like the quills of the fretful porcupine, has his last card — the black ace — raised on high, whilst Jeff, with elbow on the board and the corner of his card resting on his nose, gives his antagonist a most wicked leer from under the front-piece of his cap, appearing to say. Play on, old fellow: the last card can't help you out of the scrape. Another cut represents Old Abe's perplexity with the negro. He is seated in a room of the White House, with his hands resting on his knees, and a most woe-begone expression on his face, whilst a big buck negro, in his shirt sleeves and barefoot, with arms folded, head thrown back, and one foot on the table, in c