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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 3, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Tom's Brook (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ey — Arrival of prisoners. The train from Staunton last evening brought down one hundred and seventy-four Yankee prisoners, captured in the recent cavalry engagement in the Valley. From Captain E. H. McDonald, who had charge of the prisoners, we have some particulars of the fight. The forces engaged on our side in the commencement of the skirmish were composed of the 11th Virginia cavalry, Col. O. R. Funston, but the charge was led by General Jones in person. The attack was made at "Tom's Brook," a few miles below Woodstock, in Shenandoah county. At the first onset the Yankee columns were broken, but, under the lead of their officers, several ineffectual efforts were made to reform, our men pressing them too holly to permit them to do so successfully. Towards the close of the engagement the 7th Virginia cavalry came up, and the enemy gave way and were routed. The chase continued some fifteen miles, during which shots were several times exchanged. The lost of the enemy in kil
Woodstock, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
om Staunton last evening brought down one hundred and seventy-four Yankee prisoners, captured in the recent cavalry engagement in the Valley. From Captain E. H. McDonald, who had charge of the prisoners, we have some particulars of the fight. The forces engaged on our side in the commencement of the skirmish were composed of the 11th Virginia cavalry, Col. O. R. Funston, but the charge was led by General Jones in person. The attack was made at "Tom's Brook," a few miles below Woodstock, in Shenandoah county. At the first onset the Yankee columns were broken, but, under the lead of their officers, several ineffectual efforts were made to reform, our men pressing them too holly to permit them to do so successfully. Towards the close of the engagement the 7th Virginia cavalry came up, and the enemy gave way and were routed. The chase continued some fifteen miles, during which shots were several times exchanged. The lost of the enemy in killed and wounded was about fifty. The numb
E. H. McDonald (search for this): article 1
The affair in the Valley — Arrival of prisoners. The train from Staunton last evening brought down one hundred and seventy-four Yankee prisoners, captured in the recent cavalry engagement in the Valley. From Captain E. H. McDonald, who had charge of the prisoners, we have some particulars of the fight. The forces engaged on our side in the commencement of the skirmish were composed of the 11th Virginia cavalry, Col. O. R. Funston, but the charge was led by General Jones in person. The attack was made at "Tom's Brook," a few miles below Woodstock, in Shenandoah county. At the first onset the Yankee columns were broken, but, under the lead of their officers, several ineffectual efforts were made to reform, our men pressing them too holly to permit them to do so successfully. Towards the close of the engagement the 7th Virginia cavalry came up, and the enemy gave way and were routed. The chase continued some fifteen miles, during which shots were several times exchanged. The l
The affair in the Valley — Arrival of prisoners. The train from Staunton last evening brought down one hundred and seventy-four Yankee prisoners, captured in the recent cavalry engagement in the Valley. From Captain E. H. McDonald, who had charge of the prisoners, we have some particulars of the fight. The forces engaged on our side in the commencement of the skirmish were composed of the 11th Virginia cavalry, Col. O. R. Funston, but the charge was led by General Jones in person. The attack was made at "Tom's Brook," a few miles below Woodstock, in Shenandoah county. At the first onset the Yankee columns were broken, but, under the lead of their officers, several ineffectual efforts were made to reform, our men pressing them too holly to permit them to do so successfully. Towards the close of the engagement the 7th Virginia cavalry came up, and the enemy gave way and were routed. The chase continued some fifteen miles, during which shots were several times exchanged. The
O. R. Funston (search for this): article 1
The affair in the Valley — Arrival of prisoners. The train from Staunton last evening brought down one hundred and seventy-four Yankee prisoners, captured in the recent cavalry engagement in the Valley. From Captain E. H. McDonald, who had charge of the prisoners, we have some particulars of the fight. The forces engaged on our side in the commencement of the skirmish were composed of the 11th Virginia cavalry, Col. O. R. Funston, but the charge was led by General Jones in person. The attack was made at "Tom's Brook," a few miles below Woodstock, in Shenandoah county. At the first onset the Yankee columns were broken, but, under the lead of their officers, several ineffectual efforts were made to reform, our men pressing them too holly to permit them to do so successfully. Towards the close of the engagement the 7th Virginia cavalry came up, and the enemy gave way and were routed. The chase continued some fifteen miles, during which shots were several times exchanged. The l