hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
B. F. Butler 43 1 Browse Search
United States (United States) 28 0 Browse Search
Armstrong 14 2 Browse Search
Lincoln 14 10 Browse Search
Jones H. French 13 1 Browse Search
Dorn 11 3 Browse Search
Forrest 10 0 Browse Search
A. S. King 10 0 Browse Search
Gen Banks 10 0 Browse Search
Anderson 9 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 21, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 12 total hits in 5 results.

Gloucester Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
to the size of a small Great Eastern. She was thirty feet in length, and one horse power. We sometimes hear from the enemy. They have in the vicinity of Old Point twenty- seven thousand stolen slaves; at Yorktown about ten thousand, and at Gloucester Point three thousand, who are dying rapidly with the small pox and the black tongue. Information of the attack said to have been in contemplation against Gloucester Point was conveyed to the enemy by a woman, who was brought to Richmond throuGloucester Point was conveyed to the enemy by a woman, who was brought to Richmond through this place a few days since. She had the look of a brazen, impudent traitor. I saw to-day a pair of solid gold spurs, sent by the patriotic ladies of Prince George county, Maryland, to Gen. Robert E. Lee. The gentleman who brought them (I must not mention his name) says they cost four hundred dollars in gold. They were truly handsome, neat, plain, and seemed as though they were made for him who will wear them, and given by the generous hearts that sent them. I will write again so
Prince Georges (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 2
a small Great Eastern. She was thirty feet in length, and one horse power. We sometimes hear from the enemy. They have in the vicinity of Old Point twenty- seven thousand stolen slaves; at Yorktown about ten thousand, and at Gloucester Point three thousand, who are dying rapidly with the small pox and the black tongue. Information of the attack said to have been in contemplation against Gloucester Point was conveyed to the enemy by a woman, who was brought to Richmond through this place a few days since. She had the look of a brazen, impudent traitor. I saw to-day a pair of solid gold spurs, sent by the patriotic ladies of Prince George county, Maryland, to Gen. Robert E. Lee. The gentleman who brought them (I must not mention his name) says they cost four hundred dollars in gold. They were truly handsome, neat, plain, and seemed as though they were made for him who will wear them, and given by the generous hearts that sent them. I will write again soon. Accomac,
From the White House. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] White House, March 17th, 1863. "All quiet on the Pamankey." But little of interest has occurred since I wrote of the raid that destroyed the little steamer that General Dix, in his official report, increased to the size of a small Great Eastern. She was thirty feet in length, and one horse power. We sometimes hear from the enemy. They have in the vicinity of Old Point twenty- seven thousand stolen slaves; at Yorktown about ten thousand, and at Gloucester Point three thousand, who are dying rapidly with the small pox and the black tongue. Information of the attack said to have been in contemplation against Gloucester Point was conveyed to the enemy by a woman, who was brought to Richmond through this place a few days since. She had the look of a brazen, impudent traitor. I saw to-day a pair of solid gold spurs, sent by the patriotic ladies of Prince George county, Maryland, to Gen. Robert E. Lee. T
Robert E. Lee (search for this): article 2
a small Great Eastern. She was thirty feet in length, and one horse power. We sometimes hear from the enemy. They have in the vicinity of Old Point twenty- seven thousand stolen slaves; at Yorktown about ten thousand, and at Gloucester Point three thousand, who are dying rapidly with the small pox and the black tongue. Information of the attack said to have been in contemplation against Gloucester Point was conveyed to the enemy by a woman, who was brought to Richmond through this place a few days since. She had the look of a brazen, impudent traitor. I saw to-day a pair of solid gold spurs, sent by the patriotic ladies of Prince George county, Maryland, to Gen. Robert E. Lee. The gentleman who brought them (I must not mention his name) says they cost four hundred dollars in gold. They were truly handsome, neat, plain, and seemed as though they were made for him who will wear them, and given by the generous hearts that sent them. I will write again soon. Accomac,
March 17th, 1863 AD (search for this): article 2
From the White House. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] White House, March 17th, 1863. "All quiet on the Pamankey." But little of interest has occurred since I wrote of the raid that destroyed the little steamer that General Dix, in his official report, increased to the size of a small Great Eastern. She was thirty feet in length, and one horse power. We sometimes hear from the enemy. They have in the vicinity of Old Point twenty- seven thousand stolen slaves; at Yorktown about ten thousand, and at Gloucester Point three thousand, who are dying rapidly with the small pox and the black tongue. Information of the attack said to have been in contemplation against Gloucester Point was conveyed to the enemy by a woman, who was brought to Richmond through this place a few days since. She had the look of a brazen, impudent traitor. I saw to-day a pair of solid gold spurs, sent by the patriotic ladies of Prince George county, Maryland, to Gen. Robert E. Lee. Th