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Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 3
A good Hotel story. --In Atlanta, last week, a little incident occurred in the hotel has of business which is worth reading. The second party to the joke was the proprietor of the Atlanta Hotel. The Atlanta Confederacy says: A Lieutenant Colonel, who was wounded at Murfreesboro', who had been stopping a while with him, on the 20th day called for his bill, The obliging clerk handed him the document with 20 days multiplied by $4. The Colonel scanned the bill and observed its footingAtlanta Confederacy says: A Lieutenant Colonel, who was wounded at Murfreesboro', who had been stopping a while with him, on the 20th day called for his bill, The obliging clerk handed him the document with 20 days multiplied by $4. The Colonel scanned the bill and observed its footing up--$80. He turned to the doctor, who was present, and asked him if he did not think that pretty heavy. The doctor, with that peculiarities of the head which indicates a small whirlwind, said: "No; if you had to pay four dollars for a cobbler, one dollar a dozen for eggs, four dollars a pound for Ric coffee, one dollar twenty-five cents for butter, fifteen dollars a bushel for potatoes, and five dollars a pair for shad, you'd think it was light! " The Colonel ran his eye over his bi