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Middleburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
as for a long time imprisoned in Fort Warren. With three small children she was forced from her home, and when she arrived at Harper's Ferry it was with great difficulty that she could obtain permission for her nurse to accompany her. It may be some gratification to the enemy to know that this lady and her husband are now both safe in Dixie. Many of the citizens of Loudoun and Jefferson were being arrested by the Yankee cavalry and taken to Harper's Ferry. Some days ago they visited Middleburg and arrested and carried off about sixty citizens, and in Shickersville scarcely a male citizen was left. The whole slave labor of that section of the State has been enticed or forced away. Some five or six negro women who left Charlestown, and spent the winter in Washington, have returned, perfectly satisfied with their experience in a land of freedom. These report that many others would return if showed to do so. A few weeks ago the enemy's cavalry went to the residence of Mr. Th
Fort Warren (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 7
to children not over fourteen years of age. At Charlestown they had just established a Provost Guard, and it was expected that all the inhabitants there would be required to take the oath or leave their homes. During the stay of our interment at Harper's Ferry, a number of ladies from Baltimore passed through that place who had been expelled from their homes on account of their Southern sympathies. Among these was Mrs. Dunham, of New York whose husband was for a long time imprisoned in Fort Warren. With three small children she was forced from her home, and when she arrived at Harper's Ferry it was with great difficulty that she could obtain permission for her nurse to accompany her. It may be some gratification to the enemy to know that this lady and her husband are now both safe in Dixie. Many of the citizens of Loudoun and Jefferson were being arrested by the Yankee cavalry and taken to Harper's Ferry. Some days ago they visited Middleburg and arrested and carried off abo
Jefferson (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
ly met and converted with a gentlemen who has of late had an opportunity of witnessing some of the operation of Lincoln's minions in the counties bordering on the Potomac. This gentleman came through from Baltimore, and was detained several days at Harper's Ferry and Charlestown, from which latter point he seceded in running the blockade, and made his way safely into our liner. He says that a proclamation has been issued, by order of Gen. Schenck, requiring all persons in Loudoun and Jefferson counties to take the oath, or to be sent out of the enemy's lines. Whilst at Harper's Ferry he saw the oath administered to children not over fourteen years of age. At Charlestown they had just established a Provost Guard, and it was expected that all the inhabitants there would be required to take the oath or leave their homes. During the stay of our interment at Harper's Ferry, a number of ladies from Baltimore passed through that place who had been expelled from their homes on account of t
Loudoun (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
several days at Harper's Ferry and Charlestown, from which latter point he seceded in running the blockade, and made his way safely into our liner. He says that a proclamation has been issued, by order of Gen. Schenck, requiring all persons in Loudoun and Jefferson counties to take the oath, or to be sent out of the enemy's lines. Whilst at Harper's Ferry he saw the oath administered to children not over fourteen years of age. At Charlestown they had just established a Provost Guard, and it arper's Ferry it was with great difficulty that she could obtain permission for her nurse to accompany her. It may be some gratification to the enemy to know that this lady and her husband are now both safe in Dixie. Many of the citizens of Loudoun and Jefferson were being arrested by the Yankee cavalry and taken to Harper's Ferry. Some days ago they visited Middleburg and arrested and carried off about sixty citizens, and in Shickersville scarcely a male citizen was left. The whole slav
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
n the Potomac. This gentleman came through from Baltimore, and was detained several days at Harper's Ferry and Charlestown, from which latter point he seceded in running the blockade, and made his wa and Jefferson counties to take the oath, or to be sent out of the enemy's lines. Whilst at Harper's Ferry he saw the oath administered to children not over fourteen years of age. At Charlestown theyould be required to take the oath or leave their homes. During the stay of our interment at Harper's Ferry, a number of ladies from Baltimore passed through that place who had been expelled from theiort Warren. With three small children she was forced from her home, and when she arrived at Harper's Ferry it was with great difficulty that she could obtain permission for her nurse to accompany herthe citizens of Loudoun and Jefferson were being arrested by the Yankee cavalry and taken to Harper's Ferry. Some days ago they visited Middleburg and arrested and carried off about sixty citizens, a
Yankee operations on the Border. We have recently met and converted with a gentlemen who has of late had an opportunity of witnessing some of the operation of Lincoln's minions in the counties bordering on the Potomac. This gentleman came through from Baltimore, and was detained several days at Harper's Ferry and Charlestown, from which latter point he seceded in running the blockade, and made his way safely into our liner. He says that a proclamation has been issued, by order of Gen. Schenck, requiring all persons in Loudoun and Jefferson counties to take the oath, or to be sent out of the enemy's lines. Whilst at Harper's Ferry he saw the oath administered to children not over fourteen years of age. At Charlestown they had just established a Provost Guard, and it was expected that all the inhabitants there would be required to take the oath or leave their homes. During the stay of our interment at Harper's Ferry, a number of ladies from Baltimore passed through that place
Thomas West (search for this): article 7
could obtain permission for her nurse to accompany her. It may be some gratification to the enemy to know that this lady and her husband are now both safe in Dixie. Many of the citizens of Loudoun and Jefferson were being arrested by the Yankee cavalry and taken to Harper's Ferry. Some days ago they visited Middleburg and arrested and carried off about sixty citizens, and in Shickersville scarcely a male citizen was left. The whole slave labor of that section of the State has been enticed or forced away. Some five or six negro women who left Charlestown, and spent the winter in Washington, have returned, perfectly satisfied with their experience in a land of freedom. These report that many others would return if showed to do so. A few weeks ago the enemy's cavalry went to the residence of Mr. Thos. West, a farmer, in Jefferson county, and forced his servants all to leave. They also took with them a little daughter of Mr. W. At last accounts she had not been recovered.
Yankee operations on the Border. We have recently met and converted with a gentlemen who has of late had an opportunity of witnessing some of the operation of Lincoln's minions in the counties bordering on the Potomac. This gentleman came through from Baltimore, and was detained several days at Harper's Ferry and Charlestown, from which latter point he seceded in running the blockade, and made his way safely into our liner. He says that a proclamation has been issued, by order of Gen. Schenck, requiring all persons in Loudoun and Jefferson counties to take the oath, or to be sent out of the enemy's lines. Whilst at Harper's Ferry he saw the oath administered to children not over fourteen years of age. At Charlestown they had just established a Provost Guard, and it was expected that all the inhabitants there would be required to take the oath or leave their homes. During the stay of our interment at Harper's Ferry, a number of ladies from Baltimore passed through that place w
the enemy's lines. Whilst at Harper's Ferry he saw the oath administered to children not over fourteen years of age. At Charlestown they had just established a Provost Guard, and it was expected that all the inhabitants there would be required to take the oath or leave their homes. During the stay of our interment at Harper's Ferry, a number of ladies from Baltimore passed through that place who had been expelled from their homes on account of their Southern sympathies. Among these was Mrs. Dunham, of New York whose husband was for a long time imprisoned in Fort Warren. With three small children she was forced from her home, and when she arrived at Harper's Ferry it was with great difficulty that she could obtain permission for her nurse to accompany her. It may be some gratification to the enemy to know that this lady and her husband are now both safe in Dixie. Many of the citizens of Loudoun and Jefferson were being arrested by the Yankee cavalry and taken to Harper's Ferry
Jefferson (search for this): article 7
heir homes on account of their Southern sympathies. Among these was Mrs. Dunham, of New York whose husband was for a long time imprisoned in Fort Warren. With three small children she was forced from her home, and when she arrived at Harper's Ferry it was with great difficulty that she could obtain permission for her nurse to accompany her. It may be some gratification to the enemy to know that this lady and her husband are now both safe in Dixie. Many of the citizens of Loudoun and Jefferson were being arrested by the Yankee cavalry and taken to Harper's Ferry. Some days ago they visited Middleburg and arrested and carried off about sixty citizens, and in Shickersville scarcely a male citizen was left. The whole slave labor of that section of the State has been enticed or forced away. Some five or six negro women who left Charlestown, and spent the winter in Washington, have returned, perfectly satisfied with their experience in a land of freedom. These report that many ot