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Vermillion Bay (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 14
iments of Texas cavalry, Capt. Sime's battery and the Va and Pelican batteries. The whole force was under the command of Gen Dick Taylor, son of the late Zachary Taylor. At this moment the whole force is retreating from our troops, demoralized and hopeless of their cause. By the time our troops had a rived at New Iberia, nearly five hundred horses, mules and beef cattle, had been collected, and were placed in kraals along the wayside. Seven miles west of New Iberia, and near Vermillion bay, in the middle of a mud lake thick grown with flag and case, rises a ledge of salt rock, the surface and depth of which have not been discovered. From this mine thousands of dollars' worth of the best of salt have been daily sent away for the use of the rebel army. Negroes were employed to blast and break it up, none being ground at the time. It is reported that the rebels paid four and a half cents per pound for what they look away. The Yankees claim to have captured about 1,50
Irish Bend (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 14
, the Confederates made a strong resistance, but finally retired, leaving in the enemy's hands a 32 pounder Parrott gun and a 12 pounder howitzer. The Yankees followed the retreating Confederates for two days, during which time they were in range of their guns. The Confederates than burnt at Franklin, La, their gunboats Hart and Diana, and their steamboats Gossamer and Newsboy, Louisa, Darby, Uncle Tommy' and Blue Hammock, and sunk the Cricket. The heaviest of the fighting took place at Irish Bend, three miles west of Franklin. The Era says: The 25th Con regiment was the first to engage the enemy. It the centre of the line of battle, having the 26th Maine on the right, and the 13th sotieut on the left, and supported by the 12th Maine. It was deployed as skirmish are on the left of the road, and thus marched until of the woods. Then, while under a sharp fire from the enemy the line gradually swung around until it faced the woods letting the enemy get to their rear. Th
Vermillion (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): article 14
Yankee account of the late fight on the Techer. --Their Success--The New Orleans Era of the 19th gives the particulars of the recess of Gen. Hanks's Teche expedition. At Vermillion, on the 16th, the Confederates made a strong resistance, but finally retired, leaving in the enemy's hands a 32 pounder Parrott gun and a 12 pounder howitzer. The Yankees followed the retreating Confederates for two days, during which time they were in range of their guns. The Confederates than burnt at Franklin, La, their gunboats Hart and Diana, and their steamboats Gossamer and Newsboy, Louisa, Darby, Uncle Tommy' and Blue Hammock, and sunk the Cricket. The heaviest of the fighting took place at Irish Bend, three miles west of Franklin. The Era says: The 25th Con regiment was the first to engage the enemy. It the centre of the line of battle, having the 26th Maine on the right, and the 13th sotieut on the left, and supported by the 12th Maine. It was deployed as skirmish are on the
Yankee account of the late fight on the Techer. --Their Success--The New Orleans Era of the 19th gives the particulars of the recess of Gen. Hanks's Teche expedition. At Vermillion, on the 16th, the Confederates made a strong resistance, but finally retired, leaving in the enemy's hands a 32 pounder Parrott gun and a 12 pounder howitzer. The Yankees followed the retreating Confederates for two days, during which time they were in range of their guns. The Confederates than burnt at Franklin, La, their gunboats Hart and Diana, and their steamboats Gossamer and Newsboy, Louisa, Darby, Uncle Tommy' and Blue Hammock, and sunk the Cricket. The heaviest of the fighting took place at Irish Bend, three miles west of Franklin. The Era says: The 25th Con regiment was the first to engage the enemy. It the centre of the line of battle, having the 26th Maine on the right, and the 13th sotieut on the left, and supported by the 12th Maine. It was deployed as skirmish are on the
of Franklin to the St. Mary's Cannoneers." Soon after the charge of the 13th the enemy fell back defeated. The force opposed to us was not large, but had the advantage of position and of making a complete surprise. The total force of the rebels both here and at the batteries below, did not exceed ten thousand men. Our loss was considerable, and that of the enemy must have corresponded with ours. Sibley's brigade was included in this number--two regiments of Texas cavalry, Capt. Sime's battery and the Va and Pelican batteries. The whole force was under the command of Gen Dick Taylor, son of the late Zachary Taylor. At this moment the whole force is retreating from our troops, demoralized and hopeless of their cause. By the time our troops had a rived at New Iberia, nearly five hundred horses, mules and beef cattle, had been collected, and were placed in kraals along the wayside. Seven miles west of New Iberia, and near Vermillion bay, in the middle of a mu
Gen Dick Taylor (search for this): article 14
k defeated. The force opposed to us was not large, but had the advantage of position and of making a complete surprise. The total force of the rebels both here and at the batteries below, did not exceed ten thousand men. Our loss was considerable, and that of the enemy must have corresponded with ours. Sibley's brigade was included in this number--two regiments of Texas cavalry, Capt. Sime's battery and the Va and Pelican batteries. The whole force was under the command of Gen Dick Taylor, son of the late Zachary Taylor. At this moment the whole force is retreating from our troops, demoralized and hopeless of their cause. By the time our troops had a rived at New Iberia, nearly five hundred horses, mules and beef cattle, had been collected, and were placed in kraals along the wayside. Seven miles west of New Iberia, and near Vermillion bay, in the middle of a mud lake thick grown with flag and case, rises a ledge of salt rock, the surface and depth of which h
, bordered with rich giver tinsel, and bore upon it the inscription--"The Ladies of Franklin to the St. Mary's Cannoneers." Soon after the charge of the 13th the enemy fell back defeated. The force opposed to us was not large, but had the advantage of position and of making a complete surprise. The total force of the rebels both here and at the batteries below, did not exceed ten thousand men. Our loss was considerable, and that of the enemy must have corresponded with ours. Sibley's brigade was included in this number--two regiments of Texas cavalry, Capt. Sime's battery and the Va and Pelican batteries. The whole force was under the command of Gen Dick Taylor, son of the late Zachary Taylor. At this moment the whole force is retreating from our troops, demoralized and hopeless of their cause. By the time our troops had a rived at New Iberia, nearly five hundred horses, mules and beef cattle, had been collected, and were placed in kraals along the wayside.
Yankee account of the late fight on the Techer. --Their Success--The New Orleans Era of the 19th gives the particulars of the recess of Gen. Hanks's Teche expedition. At Vermillion, on the 16th, the Confederates made a strong resistance, but finally retired, leaving in the enemy's hands a 32 pounder Parrott gun and a 12 pounder howitzer. The Yankees followed the retreating Confederates for two days, during which time they were in range of their guns. The Confederates than burnt at Franklin, La, their gunboats Hart and Diana, and their steamboats Gossamer and Newsboy, Louisa, Darby, Uncle Tommy' and Blue Hammock, and sunk the Cricket. The heaviest of the fighting took place at Irish Bend, three miles west of Franklin. The Era says: The 25th Con regiment was the first to engage the enemy. It the centre of the line of battle, having the 26th Maine on the right, and the 13th sotieut on the left, and supported by the 12th Maine. It was deployed as skirmish are on the