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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 5, 1863., [Electronic resource].

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A glorious Confederate victory. In the language of Gen. Lee's gratifying dispatch, of the 31 of May, to President David, "We have again to thank Almighty God for a great victory." This grand and important triumph was achieved on Saturday. Gen Lee says in the beginning of his dispatch. "Yesterday Gen. Jackson penetrated to the rear of the enemy; and drove him to within one mile of Chancellorsville. This morning the battle was renewed." He (the enemy) was dislodged from all his positions around Chancellorsville and driven back towards the Rappahannock, over which he is now retreating." Many prisoners were captured. Gen. Lee states that the enemy's loss was heavy, and as he was in the act of retreating, it is to be hoped was still further to be increased. Our loss is killed and wounded, of course, must be considerable in such an engagement, but was much less than that of the enemy. The whole country will be distressed to learn that Gen. Jackson is seriously wounded. The prayer
Longstreet (search for this): article 1
e Rapidan, four miles above its mouth. The enemy having crossed into Spotsylvania, presented himself on the left of our line in front of Fredericksburg. But our sagacious Commander had taken proper measures, it may be inferred by the result. Longstreet and his command were recalled in good time, and by the best routes for an opportune junction with our main line, while the strategy for getting in rear of the enemy was matured. This decisive movement was conducted by that warrior who never fails, and on Saturday (as we understand) the enemy, in his dismay, found Jackson thundering upon his rear. Driven from his position towards Chancellorsville, he got out of the frying pan into the fire by encountering Longstreet. His rout was complete, as we are officially informed by Gen. Lee. We shall not receive details of this last brilliant engagement as rapidly as usual, owing to the cavalry raid of the enemy, which was boldly and successfully conducted upon the of the Central and Fr
A glorious Confederate victory. In the language of Gen. Lee's gratifying dispatch, of the 31 of May, to President David, "We have again to thank Almighty God for a great victory." This grand and important triumph was achieved on Saturday. Gen Lee says in the beginning of his dispatch. "Yesterday Gen. Jackson penetrated to the rear of the enemy; and drove him to within one mile of Chancellorsville. This morning the battle was renewed." He (the enemy) was dislodged from all his positions around Chancellorsville and driven back towards the Rappahannock, over which he is now retreating." Many prisoners were captured. Gen. Lee states that the enemy's loss was heavy, and as he was in the act of retreating, it is to be hoped was still further to be increased. Our loss is killed and wounded, of course, must be considerable in such an engagement, but was much less than that of the enemy. The whole country will be distressed to learn that Gen. Jackson is seriously wounded. The praye
A glorious Confederate victory. In the language of Gen. Lee's gratifying dispatch, of the 31 of May, to President David, "We have again to thank Almighty God for a great victory." This grand and important triumph was achieved on Saturday. Gen Gen Lee says in the beginning of his dispatch. "Yesterday Gen. Jackson penetrated to the rear of the enemy; and drove him to within one mile of Chancellorsville. This morning the battle was renewed." He (the enemy) was dislodged from all his positions ncellorsville and driven back towards the Rappahannock, over which he is now retreating." Many prisoners were captured. Gen. Lee states that the enemy's loss was heavy, and as he was in the act of retreating, it is to be hoped was still further to bout of the frying pan into the fire by encountering Longstreet. His rout was complete, as we are officially informed by Gen. Lee. We shall not receive details of this last brilliant engagement as rapidly as usual, owing to the cavalry raid of t
Gens Jackson (search for this): article 1
This grand and important triumph was achieved on Saturday. Gen Lee says in the beginning of his dispatch. "Yesterday Gen. Jackson penetrated to the rear of the enemy; and drove him to within one mile of Chancellorsville. This morning the battle wae in such an engagement, but was much less than that of the enemy. The whole country will be distressed to learn that Gen. Jackson is seriously wounded. The prayers of every one in the South will go up to Heaven for his recovery, and his restorationtry adjacent and widening out towards Chancellorsville is the Wilderness, out of which the enemy came at the bidding of Jackson. The United States ford is on the Rappahannock, eight miles above Fredericksburg, and two miles below the mouth of the vement was conducted by that warrior who never fails, and on Saturday (as we understand) the enemy, in his dismay, found Jackson thundering upon his rear. Driven from his position towards Chancellorsville, he got out of the frying pan into the fire
Wilderness Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
on is seriously wounded. The prayers of every one in the South will go up to Heaven for his recovery, and his restoration to the country and the cause, in the field of battle. The scene of the battle is in Spotsylvania county, between the Wilderness and Chancellorsville. The latter is a place with only one dwelling, a large brick house, formerly a tavern, and latterly a boarding school. It is about ten miles west of Fredericksburg. The Wilderness we suppose to be indicated by "Wilderness Creek," a small stream running into the Rappahannock, about four or five miles from Chancellorsville; the country adjacent and widening out towards Chancellorsville is the Wilderness, out of which the enemy came at the bidding of Jackson. The United States ford is on the Rappahannock, eight miles above Fredericksburg, and two miles below the mouth of the Rapidan. Elyisford is on the Rapidan, four miles above its mouth. The enemy having crossed into Spotsylvania, presented himself on the le
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
s and Chancellorsville. The latter is a place with only one dwelling, a large brick house, formerly a tavern, and latterly a boarding school. It is about ten miles west of Fredericksburg. The Wilderness we suppose to be indicated by "Wilderness Creek," a small stream running into the Rappahannock, about four or five miles from Chancellorsville; the country adjacent and widening out towards Chancellorsville is the Wilderness, out of which the enemy came at the bidding of Jackson. The United States ford is on the Rappahannock, eight miles above Fredericksburg, and two miles below the mouth of the Rapidan. Elyisford is on the Rapidan, four miles above its mouth. The enemy having crossed into Spotsylvania, presented himself on the left of our line in front of Fredericksburg. But our sagacious Commander had taken proper measures, it may be inferred by the result. Longstreet and his command were recalled in good time, and by the best routes for an opportune junction with our main l
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
erday Gen. Jackson penetrated to the rear of the enemy; and drove him to within one mile of Chancellorsville. This morning the battle was renewed." He (the enemy) was dislodged from all his positions around Chancellorsville and driven back towards the Rappahannock, over which he is now retreating." Many prisoners were captured. Gen. Lee states that the enemy's loss was heavy, and as he was in thderness Creek," a small stream running into the Rappahannock, about four or five miles from Chancellorsville; the country adjacent and widening out towards Chancellorsville is the Wilderness, out of wChancellorsville is the Wilderness, out of which the enemy came at the bidding of Jackson. The United States ford is on the Rappahannock, eight miles above Fredericksburg, and two miles below the mouth of the Rapidan. Elyisford is on the Rapiy, in his dismay, found Jackson thundering upon his rear. Driven from his position towards Chancellorsville, he got out of the frying pan into the fire by encountering Longstreet. His rout was compl
Spotsylvania county (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
he was in the act of retreating, it is to be hoped was still further to be increased. Our loss is killed and wounded, of course, must be considerable in such an engagement, but was much less than that of the enemy. The whole country will be distressed to learn that Gen. Jackson is seriously wounded. The prayers of every one in the South will go up to Heaven for his recovery, and his restoration to the country and the cause, in the field of battle. The scene of the battle is in Spotsylvania county, between the Wilderness and Chancellorsville. The latter is a place with only one dwelling, a large brick house, formerly a tavern, and latterly a boarding school. It is about ten miles west of Fredericksburg. The Wilderness we suppose to be indicated by "Wilderness Creek," a small stream running into the Rappahannock, about four or five miles from Chancellorsville; the country adjacent and widening out towards Chancellorsville is the Wilderness, out of which the enemy came at the
Rapidan (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
and latterly a boarding school. It is about ten miles west of Fredericksburg. The Wilderness we suppose to be indicated by "Wilderness Creek," a small stream running into the Rappahannock, about four or five miles from Chancellorsville; the country adjacent and widening out towards Chancellorsville is the Wilderness, out of which the enemy came at the bidding of Jackson. The United States ford is on the Rappahannock, eight miles above Fredericksburg, and two miles below the mouth of the Rapidan. Elyisford is on the Rapidan, four miles above its mouth. The enemy having crossed into Spotsylvania, presented himself on the left of our line in front of Fredericksburg. But our sagacious Commander had taken proper measures, it may be inferred by the result. Longstreet and his command were recalled in good time, and by the best routes for an opportune junction with our main line, while the strategy for getting in rear of the enemy was matured. This decisive movement was conducted by
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