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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: May 5, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Ashland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 6
The enemy at Ashland. A gentleman who was on the train bringing down the sick and wounded, which was captured by the enemy at Ashland, gives the following addiAshland, gives the following additional particulars: The train approached Ashland about four o'clock Sunday evening. A negro warned it a mile and a half beyond the town of some danger but our iAshland about four o'clock Sunday evening. A negro warned it a mile and a half beyond the town of some danger but our informant says he was unheeded — nobody would take the responsibility of stopping the train, which ran into the town and into the hands of the Yankees before it was s One of them had most important papers on his person. The Yankees burnt at Ashland two locomotives and tenders and some cars. They tore up a mile or two of road, destroyed all the bridges from Ashland to within five miles of Richmond, and cut the telegraph. They injured no private property. They got a mail, and among okely prolong their sojourn in the Slashes. Our informant had to walk from Ashland, and reached the city yesterday at mid-day.--He understood the Yankees to be m
stopping the train, which ran into the town and into the hands of the Yankees before it was stopped. His statement would certainly convict some one of gross culpability. It was fired on and stopped, but no one hurt. The sick and wounded and officers were paroled to the number of about 300. They arrested no citizen save Mr. J. D Alexander, of Fredericksburg, who was twice in custody and twice released by Col. Davis, who seemed to direct matters, though a superior officer, supposed to be Stoneman, was with the command. Some Government officials adroitly escaped under the garb of citizens' apparel. One of them had most important papers on his person. The Yankees burnt at Ashland two locomotives and tenders and some cars. They tore up a mile or two of road, destroyed all the bridges from Ashland to within five miles of Richmond, and cut the telegraph. They injured no private property. They got a mail, and among other matter got a letter from a correspondent of the Dispatch
Lewis Davis (search for this): article 6
er but our informant says he was unheeded — nobody would take the responsibility of stopping the train, which ran into the town and into the hands of the Yankees before it was stopped. His statement would certainly convict some one of gross culpability. It was fired on and stopped, but no one hurt. The sick and wounded and officers were paroled to the number of about 300. They arrested no citizen save Mr. J. D Alexander, of Fredericksburg, who was twice in custody and twice released by Col. Davis, who seemed to direct matters, though a superior officer, supposed to be Stoneman, was with the command. Some Government officials adroitly escaped under the garb of citizens' apparel. One of them had most important papers on his person. The Yankees burnt at Ashland two locomotives and tenders and some cars. They tore up a mile or two of road, destroyed all the bridges from Ashland to within five miles of Richmond, and cut the telegraph. They injured no private property. They g
Alexander (search for this): article 6
day evening. A negro warned it a mile and a half beyond the town of some danger but our informant says he was unheeded — nobody would take the responsibility of stopping the train, which ran into the town and into the hands of the Yankees before it was stopped. His statement would certainly convict some one of gross culpability. It was fired on and stopped, but no one hurt. The sick and wounded and officers were paroled to the number of about 300. They arrested no citizen save Mr. J. D Alexander, of Fredericksburg, who was twice in custody and twice released by Col. Davis, who seemed to direct matters, though a superior officer, supposed to be Stoneman, was with the command. Some Government officials adroitly escaped under the garb of citizens' apparel. One of them had most important papers on his person. The Yankees burnt at Ashland two locomotives and tenders and some cars. They tore up a mile or two of road, destroyed all the bridges from Ashland to within five miles of