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Birkenhead (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 7
ally no guns on board the Alexandria. The vessel, however, is now in charge of Government officials, and no doubt the investigation which is to take place will elucidate whether there were guns on board or not. The excitement among the gentlemen of Southern proclivities is very great. Laird's famous shipyard, at Liverpool, where the Alabama was built, it would seem from the following paragraph of a Liverpool letter, published in the Manchester Guardian, is also to be watched: The Government, in addition to the seizure of the Alexandria on the Liverpool side of the Mersey, are about, if they have not already done so, to put the building yard of Messrs. Laird & Brothers, at Birkenhead, under a kind of surveillance, as it is no longer doubted in Liverpool that the two gunboats now in course of construction at the Birkenhead Iron Works are intended for the Confederate Government. Information, we know, has been received in Liverpool of the above intention of the Government.
f the gunboat Alexandria by the custom-house authorities, on suspicion that she was intended for the service of the Confederates. A Liverpool letter in the London Daily News gives the following particulars of the seizure: It had been well known for some weeks past that one gunboat, if not more, was fitting out in some of the minor docks in Liverpool, and those employed about them made no secret of the destination for which they were intended. On the facts coming to the knowledge of Mr. Dudley, the United States Consul at Liverpool, he at once communicated with the American Minister in London, and the result was that inquiries were instituted into the whole of the proceedings bearing upon the building of the vessel seized. These inquiries appear to have been so far successful that the British Government sent down orders to seize the vessel, and at an early hour yesterday morning (April 6) Mr. E. Morgan, one of the Customs Surveyors, went on board the Alexandria--that being, lik
sel, however, is now in charge of Government officials, and no doubt the investigation which is to take place will elucidate whether there were guns on board or not. The excitement among the gentlemen of Southern proclivities is very great. Laird's famous shipyard, at Liverpool, where the Alabama was built, it would seem from the following paragraph of a Liverpool letter, published in the Manchester Guardian, is also to be watched: The Government, in addition to the seizure of the Aernment, in addition to the seizure of the Alexandria on the Liverpool side of the Mersey, are about, if they have not already done so, to put the building yard of Messrs. Laird & Brothers, at Birkenhead, under a kind of surveillance, as it is no longer doubted in Liverpool that the two gunboats now in course of construction at the Birkenhead Iron Works are intended for the Confederate Government. Information, we know, has been received in Liverpool of the above intention of the Government.
E. Morgan (search for this): article 7
nation for which they were intended. On the facts coming to the knowledge of Mr. Dudley, the United States Consul at Liverpool, he at once communicated with the American Minister in London, and the result was that inquiries were instituted into the whole of the proceedings bearing upon the building of the vessel seized. These inquiries appear to have been so far successful that the British Government sent down orders to seize the vessel, and at an early hour yesterday morning (April 6) Mr. E. Morgan, one of the Customs Surveyors, went on board the Alexandria--that being, like "290," the first christening of the gunboat, as no doubt had she got clear off she would have undergone a rechristening — and took possession of her. The Alexandria is a wooden screw steamer of about one hundred and twenty tons, and a very fine model. She was built by Messrs. Miller & Co., of the South End, for Messrs. Frazer, Trenholm & Co., of Liverpool, the 'depositaries' in Liverpool (in conjunction w
o seize the vessel, and at an early hour yesterday morning (April 6) Mr. E. Morgan, one of the Customs Surveyors, went on board the Alexandria--that being, like "290," the first christening of the gunboat, as no doubt had she got clear off she would have undergone a rechristening — and took possession of her. The Alexandria is a wooden screw steamer of about one hundred and twenty tons, and a very fine model. She was built by Messrs. Miller & Co., of the South End, for Messrs. Frazer, Trenholm & Co., of Liverpool, the 'depositaries' in Liverpool (in conjunction with Mr. James Spence) of the Confederate Government. At the time the vessel was seized she was lying in the Toxteth dock, a quiet, out of the way place. An iron ship-building firm, near the builders of the Alexandria, have a large iron gunboat, of about twelve hundred tons, on the stocks for the Confederate Government; but it is now stated that our Government has issued instructions to the officials here that in all
successful that the British Government sent down orders to seize the vessel, and at an early hour yesterday morning (April 6) Mr. E. Morgan, one of the Customs Surveyors, went on board the Alexandria--that being, like "290," the first christening of the gunboat, as no doubt had she got clear off she would have undergone a rechristening — and took possession of her. The Alexandria is a wooden screw steamer of about one hundred and twenty tons, and a very fine model. She was built by Messrs. Miller & Co., of the South End, for Messrs. Frazer, Trenholm & Co., of Liverpool, the 'depositaries' in Liverpool (in conjunction with Mr. James Spence) of the Confederate Government. At the time the vessel was seized she was lying in the Toxteth dock, a quiet, out of the way place. An iron ship-building firm, near the builders of the Alexandria, have a large iron gunboat, of about twelve hundred tons, on the stocks for the Confederate Government; but it is now stated that our Government
down orders to seize the vessel, and at an early hour yesterday morning (April 6) Mr. E. Morgan, one of the Customs Surveyors, went on board the Alexandria--that being, like "290," the first christening of the gunboat, as no doubt had she got clear off she would have undergone a rechristening — and took possession of her. The Alexandria is a wooden screw steamer of about one hundred and twenty tons, and a very fine model. She was built by Messrs. Miller & Co., of the South End, for Messrs. Frazer, Trenholm & Co., of Liverpool, the 'depositaries' in Liverpool (in conjunction with Mr. James Spence) of the Confederate Government. At the time the vessel was seized she was lying in the Toxteth dock, a quiet, out of the way place. An iron ship-building firm, near the builders of the Alexandria, have a large iron gunboat, of about twelve hundred tons, on the stocks for the Confederate Government; but it is now stated that our Government has issued instructions to the officials her
James Spence (search for this): article 7
of the Customs Surveyors, went on board the Alexandria--that being, like "290," the first christening of the gunboat, as no doubt had she got clear off she would have undergone a rechristening — and took possession of her. The Alexandria is a wooden screw steamer of about one hundred and twenty tons, and a very fine model. She was built by Messrs. Miller & Co., of the South End, for Messrs. Frazer, Trenholm & Co., of Liverpool, the 'depositaries' in Liverpool (in conjunction with Mr. James Spence) of the Confederate Government. At the time the vessel was seized she was lying in the Toxteth dock, a quiet, out of the way place. An iron ship-building firm, near the builders of the Alexandria, have a large iron gunboat, of about twelve hundred tons, on the stocks for the Confederate Government; but it is now stated that our Government has issued instructions to the officials here that in all cases where there is the slightest suspicion that ships are being built here for other
Seizure of a Confederate gunboat at Liverpool.--a shipyard under Surveilllance. Considerable excitement was created in Liverpool on the 6th ult. by the seizure of the gunboat Alexandria by the custom-house authorities, on suspicion that she was intended for the service of the Confederates. A Liverpool letter in the London Daily News gives the following particulars of the seizure: It had been well known for some weeks past that one gunboat, if not more, was fitting out in some of the minor docks in Liverpool, and those employed about them made no secret of the destination for which they were intended. On the facts coming to the knowledge of Mr. Dudley, the United States Consul at Liverpool, he at once communicated with the American Minister in London, and the result was that inquiries were instituted into the whole of the proceedings bearing upon the building of the vessel seized. These inquiries appear to have been so far successful that the British Government sent down
June, 4 AD (search for this): article 7
of the destination for which they were intended. On the facts coming to the knowledge of Mr. Dudley, the United States Consul at Liverpool, he at once communicated with the American Minister in London, and the result was that inquiries were instituted into the whole of the proceedings bearing upon the building of the vessel seized. These inquiries appear to have been so far successful that the British Government sent down orders to seize the vessel, and at an early hour yesterday morning (April 6) Mr. E. Morgan, one of the Customs Surveyors, went on board the Alexandria--that being, like "290," the first christening of the gunboat, as no doubt had she got clear off she would have undergone a rechristening — and took possession of her. The Alexandria is a wooden screw steamer of about one hundred and twenty tons, and a very fine model. She was built by Messrs. Miller & Co., of the South End, for Messrs. Frazer, Trenholm & Co., of Liverpool, the 'depositaries' in Liverpool (in c