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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: May 8, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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General Longstreet. This gallant and experienced officer, in whom so much confidence is placed by the people of the South, did not participate in the recent triumphs near the Rappahannock. Many persons, in reading General Lee's brief dispatch announcing our victory, received the impression that he commanded the divisions attacking the enemy's front at Chancellorsville. He was not present. Two of his divisions were there, and maintained their good fame by their intrepid and successful assaults upon the foe.--It is not an unpleasant reflection, however, that we had such men absent when such achievements were accomplished for the national reputation.
Longstreet (search for this): article 3
General Longstreet. This gallant and experienced officer, in whom so much confidence is placed by the people of the South, did not participate in the recent triumphs near the Rappahannock. Many persons, in reading General Lee's brief dispatch announcing our victory, received the impression that he commanded the divisions attacking the enemy's front at Chancellorsville. He was not present. Two of his divisions were there, and maintained their good fame by their intrepid and successful assaults upon the foe.--It is not an unpleasant reflection, however, that we had such men absent when such achievements were accomplished for the national reputation.
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
General Longstreet. This gallant and experienced officer, in whom so much confidence is placed by the people of the South, did not participate in the recent triumphs near the Rappahannock. Many persons, in reading General Lee's brief dispatch announcing our victory, received the impression that he commanded the divisions attacking the enemy's front at Chancellorsville. He was not present. Two of his divisions were there, and maintained their good fame by their intrepid and successful assaults upon the foe.--It is not an unpleasant reflection, however, that we had such men absent when such achievements were accomplished for the national reputation.