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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: May 9, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 8
A Proud memorial. Accompanying the annual report of Adjutant-General Richardson is a document entitled "Memorial of the eleven of the Virginia Military Institute, in the war of independence of the Confederate States of America, 1861-'62." It presents a list of the graduates of that institution who have entered the service, the positions they hold, and the fates of those who have been wounded or killed in battle.--From this it appears that they consist as follows: Brigadier Generals.8 Colonels57 Lieutenant-Colonels42 Majors45 Captains110 Lieutenants77 Volunteer Privates.11 Of General and Regimental Staff81 431 General Smith, Superintendent of the Institute, in closing his report, says that the list accounts for nearly every graduate save those incapacitated by physical inability for military service. He adds: "James V. Hall, without arms and eyes, from the effects of the explosion of a six pounder gun, is among the number of the Alumni who are Providential
Richardson (search for this): article 8
A Proud memorial. Accompanying the annual report of Adjutant-General Richardson is a document entitled "Memorial of the eleven of the Virginia Military Institute, in the war of independence of the Confederate States of America, 1861-'62." It presents a list of the graduates of that institution who have entered the service, the positions they hold, and the fates of those who have been wounded or killed in battle.--From this it appears that they consist as follows: Brigadier Genery for military service. He adds: "James V. Hall, without arms and eyes, from the effects of the explosion of a six pounder gun, is among the number of the Alumni who are Providentially out of the service." The memorial is one which, as Gen. Richardson says, "will be read with pride and satisfaction by every son of Virginia." General Smith says, with entire justice, that it exhibits "such a result as will serve to magnify the great work which, in the providence of God, has been entrusted t
James V. Hall (search for this): article 8
itions they hold, and the fates of those who have been wounded or killed in battle.--From this it appears that they consist as follows: Brigadier Generals.8 Colonels57 Lieutenant-Colonels42 Majors45 Captains110 Lieutenants77 Volunteer Privates.11 Of General and Regimental Staff81 431 General Smith, Superintendent of the Institute, in closing his report, says that the list accounts for nearly every graduate save those incapacitated by physical inability for military service. He adds: "James V. Hall, without arms and eyes, from the effects of the explosion of a six pounder gun, is among the number of the Alumni who are Providentially out of the service." The memorial is one which, as Gen. Richardson says, "will be read with pride and satisfaction by every son of Virginia." General Smith says, with entire justice, that it exhibits "such a result as will serve to magnify the great work which, in the providence of God, has been entrusted to this institution."
John Smith (search for this): article 8
killed in battle.--From this it appears that they consist as follows: Brigadier Generals.8 Colonels57 Lieutenant-Colonels42 Majors45 Captains110 Lieutenants77 Volunteer Privates.11 Of General and Regimental Staff81 431 General Smith, Superintendent of the Institute, in closing his report, says that the list accounts for nearly every graduate save those incapacitated by physical inability for military service. He adds: "James V. Hall, without arms and eyes, from the effe. He adds: "James V. Hall, without arms and eyes, from the effects of the explosion of a six pounder gun, is among the number of the Alumni who are Providentially out of the service." The memorial is one which, as Gen. Richardson says, "will be read with pride and satisfaction by every son of Virginia." General Smith says, with entire justice, that it exhibits "such a result as will serve to magnify the great work which, in the providence of God, has been entrusted to this institution."
A Proud memorial. Accompanying the annual report of Adjutant-General Richardson is a document entitled "Memorial of the eleven of the Virginia Military Institute, in the war of independence of the Confederate States of America, 1861-'62." It presents a list of the graduates of that institution who have entered the service, the positions they hold, and the fates of those who have been wounded or killed in battle.--From this it appears that they consist as follows: Brigadier Generals.8 Colonels57 Lieutenant-Colonels42 Majors45 Captains110 Lieutenants77 Volunteer Privates.11 Of General and Regimental Staff81 431 General Smith, Superintendent of the Institute, in closing his report, says that the list accounts for nearly every graduate save those incapacitated by physical inability for military service. He adds: "James V. Hall, without arms and eyes, from the effects of the explosion of a six pounder gun, is among the number of the Alumni who are Providentiall