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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: May 11, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Fort Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): article 6
pping Rohr. On arriving at the ferry. Baylor and his men secreted themselves under the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad bridge, while the negro was sent forward to signal Rohr to come over with his boat, which he did readily. When he arrived on the Virginia side, young Baylor rushed from his concealment and demanded his surrender. Instead of complying with the demand, Rohr, who was armed, attempted resistance, when he was fired upon and killed by some one of the detachment. Upon the facts above narrated the Yankees have based an informal charge of murder and violation of a flag of truce, and refused to exchange Capt. Baylor, notwithstanding he has repeatedly demanded an investigation of the whole affair. Refusing to investigate the matter, they have, through sheer malignity, detained their captive for nearly six months in Fort Delaware the Confederate Government owes it to itself and the brave men who are imperiling their lives for its defence, to demand his immediate exchange.
Jefferson (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 6
rt ware The case of Capt. B. is a peculiarly hard one, and strikingly illustrates the bitterness of Yankee hatred. At the time of his capture he was just recovering from a severe wound, received in the service of his country, and from which his recovery at one time was deemed exceedingly doubtful. The causes for the detention of Capt. B may be briefly stated. Some time previous to the evacuation of the Lower Valley he was in command of a cavalry company, which was on detached service in Jefferson by command of Brig. Gen. Carson, who was at the time in command of that Department. A disloyal resident of Harper's Ferry, by the name of Rohr, was in the habit of ferrying negroes across the Potomac at that point, and running them off to the camps of the enemy at Sandy Hook, about two miles from the ferry. This man Capt. B. Determined to capture, and for this purpose sent his son in command of a detachment to accomplish that object.--Young Baylor took with him a trusty negro man, to
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 6
he time of his capture he was just recovering from a severe wound, received in the service of his country, and from which his recovery at one time was deemed exceedingly doubtful. The causes for the detention of Capt. B may be briefly stated. Some time previous to the evacuation of the Lower Valley he was in command of a cavalry company, which was on detached service in Jefferson by command of Brig. Gen. Carson, who was at the time in command of that Department. A disloyal resident of Harper's Ferry, by the name of Rohr, was in the habit of ferrying negroes across the Potomac at that point, and running them off to the camps of the enemy at Sandy Hook, about two miles from the ferry. This man Capt. B. Determined to capture, and for this purpose sent his son in command of a detachment to accomplish that object.--Young Baylor took with him a trusty negro man, to aid his purpose of entrapping Rohr. On arriving at the ferry. Baylor and his men secreted themselves under the Baltimo
Robert W. Baylor (search for this): article 6
Our Unchanged prisoners. We have heretofore mentioned the fact that Capt. Robert W. Baylor, who was captured in the neighborhood of Charlestown, Va. in the early part of December last, is still , and for this purpose sent his son in command of a detachment to accomplish that object.--Young Baylor took with him a trusty negro man, to aid his purpose of entrapping Rohr. On arriving at the ferry. Baylor and his men secreted themselves under the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad bridge, while the negro was sent forward to signal Rohr to come over with his boat, which he did readily. When he arrived on the Virginia side, young Baylor rushed from his concealment and demanded his surrender. Instead of complying with the demand, Rohr, who was armed, attempted resistance, when he was fired upon based an informal charge of murder and violation of a flag of truce, and refused to exchange Capt. Baylor, notwithstanding he has repeatedly demanded an investigation of the whole affair. Refusing t
ig. Gen. Carson, who was at the time in command of that Department. A disloyal resident of Harper's Ferry, by the name of Rohr, was in the habit of ferrying negroes across the Potomac at that point, and running them off to the camps of the enemy at f a detachment to accomplish that object.--Young Baylor took with him a trusty negro man, to aid his purpose of entrapping Rohr. On arriving at the ferry. Baylor and his men secreted themselves under the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad bridge, while the negro was sent forward to signal Rohr to come over with his boat, which he did readily. When he arrived on the Virginia side, young Baylor rushed from his concealment and demanded his surrender. Instead of complying with the demand, Rohr, who wasRohr, who was armed, attempted resistance, when he was fired upon and killed by some one of the detachment. Upon the facts above narrated the Yankees have based an informal charge of murder and violation of a flag of truce, and refused to exchange Capt. Bayl
is a peculiarly hard one, and strikingly illustrates the bitterness of Yankee hatred. At the time of his capture he was just recovering from a severe wound, received in the service of his country, and from which his recovery at one time was deemed exceedingly doubtful. The causes for the detention of Capt. B may be briefly stated. Some time previous to the evacuation of the Lower Valley he was in command of a cavalry company, which was on detached service in Jefferson by command of Brig. Gen. Carson, who was at the time in command of that Department. A disloyal resident of Harper's Ferry, by the name of Rohr, was in the habit of ferrying negroes across the Potomac at that point, and running them off to the camps of the enemy at Sandy Hook, about two miles from the ferry. This man Capt. B. Determined to capture, and for this purpose sent his son in command of a detachment to accomplish that object.--Young Baylor took with him a trusty negro man, to aid his purpose of entrappi
B. Determined (search for this): article 6
B may be briefly stated. Some time previous to the evacuation of the Lower Valley he was in command of a cavalry company, which was on detached service in Jefferson by command of Brig. Gen. Carson, who was at the time in command of that Department. A disloyal resident of Harper's Ferry, by the name of Rohr, was in the habit of ferrying negroes across the Potomac at that point, and running them off to the camps of the enemy at Sandy Hook, about two miles from the ferry. This man Capt. B. Determined to capture, and for this purpose sent his son in command of a detachment to accomplish that object.--Young Baylor took with him a trusty negro man, to aid his purpose of entrapping Rohr. On arriving at the ferry. Baylor and his men secreted themselves under the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad bridge, while the negro was sent forward to signal Rohr to come over with his boat, which he did readily. When he arrived on the Virginia side, young Baylor rushed from his concealment and demande
Our Unchanged prisoners. We have heretofore mentioned the fact that Capt. Robert W. Baylor, who was captured in the neighborhood of Charlestown, Va. in the early part of December last, is still held as a prisoners in Fort ware The case of Capt. B. is a peculiarly hard one, and strikingly illustrates the bitterness of Yankee hatred. At the time of his capture he was just recovering from a severe wound, received in the service of his country, and from which his recovery at one time was deemed exceedingly doubtful. The causes for the detention of Capt. B may be briefly stated. Some time previous to the evacuation of the Lower Valley he was in command of a cavalry company, which was on detached service in Jefferson by command of Brig. Gen. Carson, who was at the time in command of that Department. A disloyal resident of Harper's Ferry, by the name of Rohr, was in the habit of ferrying negroes across the Potomac at that point, and running them off to the camps of the enemy at Sand