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Gen Jackson (search for this): article 12
Further particulars of the last Moments of Gen Jackson,--his religious character. The editor of the Central Presbyterian, who had peculiar means of obtaining correct information relative to the death of Gen. Jackson, publishes some further verGen. Jackson, publishes some further very interesting particulars of the event. The immediate cause of his death was pneumonia, which his system, prostrated by the wounds and amputation, was unable to cast off. And it is a characteristic that the which issued in this was contracted byar off, the thunder of the captains and the shouting," made that rare and lofty type of martial prowess that has shrined Jackson among the great heroes of the world. Trust in God and eagerness for the fray were two of the great elements of that maren it was told him that Gen. Stuart led his old Stonewall brigade to the charge with the watchword, "Charge and remember Jackson," and that inspired by this, they made so brilliant and resistless an onset, he was deeply moved, and said, "It was just
I regard it as one of the greatest blessings of my life. "--Mr. S. remarked, "All things work together for good to those that love God." "Yes, yes," he emphatically said, "That's it, that's it. " When Gen. Lee wrote him that beautiful note, so characteristic of his own generosity and worth, after hearing it read, he said, with his usual modesty and reverence, "Gen. Lee should give the glory to God." He always seemed jealous for the glory of his Saviour. When it was told him that Gen. Stuart led his old Stonewall brigade to the charge with the watchword, "Charge and remember Jackson," and that inspired by this, they made so brilliant and resistless an onset, he was deeply moved, and said, "It was just like them; it was just like them. They are a noble body of men." He was deeply affected by Gen. Paxton's death." His mind ran very much on the Bible and religious topics. He inquired of Lieut. S, a theological student on his Staff, whether they had ever debated in the Sem
ould regard this as a great misfortune; I regard it as one of the greatest blessings of my life. "--Mr. S. remarked, "All things work together for good to those that love God." "Yes, yes," he emphatically said, "That's it, that's it. " When Gen. Lee wrote him that beautiful note, so characteristic of his own generosity and worth, after hearing it read, he said, with his usual modesty and reverence, "Gen. Lee should give the glory to God." He always seemed jealous for the glory of his SaviouGen. Lee should give the glory to God." He always seemed jealous for the glory of his Saviour. When it was told him that Gen. Stuart led his old Stonewall brigade to the charge with the watchword, "Charge and remember Jackson," and that inspired by this, they made so brilliant and resistless an onset, he was deeply moved, and said, "It was just like them; it was just like them. They are a noble body of men." He was deeply affected by Gen. Paxton's death." His mind ran very much on the Bible and religious topics. He inquired of Lieut. S, a theological student on his Staff, w
had always desired to die, if it were God's will, on the Sabbath, and seemed to greet its light that day with peculiar pleasure, saying, with evident delight, "It is the Lord's day," and inquired anxiously what provision had been made for preaching to the army; and having ascertained that arrangements were made, he was contented. Delirium, which occasionally manifested itself during the last two days, prevented some of the utterances of his faith which would other wise have doubtless been made. His thoughts vibrated between religious subjects and the battle field, now asking some question about the Bible, or church history, and then giving an order--"Pass the infantry to the front," "Tell Major Hawks to send forward provisions to the men," "Let us cross over the river, and rest under the shade of the trees"--until at last his gallant spirit gently passed over the dark river, and entered on its rest where the tree of life is blooming beside the crystal river in the better country.
, he said, with his usual modesty and reverence, "Gen. Lee should give the glory to God." He always seemed jealous for the glory of his Saviour. When it was told him that Gen. Stuart led his old Stonewall brigade to the charge with the watchword, "Charge and remember Jackson," and that inspired by this, they made so brilliant and resistless an onset, he was deeply moved, and said, "It was just like them; it was just like them. They are a noble body of men." He was deeply affected by Gen. Paxton's death." His mind ran very much on the Bible and religious topics. He inquired of Lieut. S, a theological student on his Staff, whether they had ever debated in the Seminary the question whether those who were miraculously cured by Jesus ever had a return of the disease. "I do not think," he said, "they could have returned, for the power was too great. The poor paralytic would never again shake with palsy. Oh! for infinite power!" He endeavored to cheer those who were around