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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: May 20, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Brownsville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 6
Railroad, between the Big Black river and the city of Jackson. To engage the enemy our forces had to leave their strong positions around Vicksburg, and cross that stream, which runs in a southwesterly direction, and empties into the Mississippi some thirty miles below the city. After the battle our forces fell back behind the Big Black, on the Vicksburg side of which our line of fortifications commence. The presence of Gen. J. E. Johnston will infuse new confidence in our soldiers, and the country will feel measurably relieved when it is generally known that he is to command in person at so important a point. The following is a copy of the dispatch of Gen. Johnston: Camp Between Livingston and Brownsville, May 18, 1863. Gen. S. Cooper: Lieutenant General Pemberton was attacked by the enemy on the morning of the 15th inst., near Edwards's Depot, and, after nine hours fighting, was compelled to fall back behind Big Black. J. E. Johnston, General Commanding.
Big Black (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 6
s at last occurred between the contending armies in the vicinity of Vicksburg. Whilst the information conveyed in the dispatch is not so cheering as we could desire, we can see nothing in it to encourage the belief that Vicksburg is more endangered than before, or that its fall must result from the partial defeat of our forces after nine hours severe fighting. Edwards's Depot, where the battle took place, is understood to be a station on the Vicksburg and Jackson Railroad, between the Big Black river and the city of Jackson. To engage the enemy our forces had to leave their strong positions around Vicksburg, and cross that stream, which runs in a southwesterly direction, and empties into the Mississippi some thirty miles below the city. After the battle our forces fell back behind the Big Black, on the Vicksburg side of which our line of fortifications commence. The presence of Gen. J. E. Johnston will infuse new confidence in our soldiers, and the country will feel measurably re
Edward's Depot (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 6
atch is not so cheering as we could desire, we can see nothing in it to encourage the belief that Vicksburg is more endangered than before, or that its fall must result from the partial defeat of our forces after nine hours severe fighting. Edwards's Depot, where the battle took place, is understood to be a station on the Vicksburg and Jackson Railroad, between the Big Black river and the city of Jackson. To engage the enemy our forces had to leave their strong positions around Vicksburg, anduntry will feel measurably relieved when it is generally known that he is to command in person at so important a point. The following is a copy of the dispatch of Gen. Johnston: Camp Between Livingston and Brownsville, May 18, 1863. Gen. S. Cooper: Lieutenant General Pemberton was attacked by the enemy on the morning of the 15th inst., near Edwards's Depot, and, after nine hours fighting, was compelled to fall back behind Big Black. J. E. Johnston, General Commanding.
S. Cooper (search for this): article 6
Railroad, between the Big Black river and the city of Jackson. To engage the enemy our forces had to leave their strong positions around Vicksburg, and cross that stream, which runs in a southwesterly direction, and empties into the Mississippi some thirty miles below the city. After the battle our forces fell back behind the Big Black, on the Vicksburg side of which our line of fortifications commence. The presence of Gen. J. E. Johnston will infuse new confidence in our soldiers, and the country will feel measurably relieved when it is generally known that he is to command in person at so important a point. The following is a copy of the dispatch of Gen. Johnston: Camp Between Livingston and Brownsville, May 18, 1863. Gen. S. Cooper: Lieutenant General Pemberton was attacked by the enemy on the morning of the 15th inst., near Edwards's Depot, and, after nine hours fighting, was compelled to fall back behind Big Black. J. E. Johnston, General Commanding.
Pemberton (search for this): article 6
Railroad, between the Big Black river and the city of Jackson. To engage the enemy our forces had to leave their strong positions around Vicksburg, and cross that stream, which runs in a southwesterly direction, and empties into the Mississippi some thirty miles below the city. After the battle our forces fell back behind the Big Black, on the Vicksburg side of which our line of fortifications commence. The presence of Gen. J. E. Johnston will infuse new confidence in our soldiers, and the country will feel measurably relieved when it is generally known that he is to command in person at so important a point. The following is a copy of the dispatch of Gen. Johnston: Camp Between Livingston and Brownsville, May 18, 1863. Gen. S. Cooper: Lieutenant General Pemberton was attacked by the enemy on the morning of the 15th inst., near Edwards's Depot, and, after nine hours fighting, was compelled to fall back behind Big Black. J. E. Johnston, General Commanding.
J. E. Johnston (search for this): article 6
the city. After the battle our forces fell back behind the Big Black, on the Vicksburg side of which our line of fortifications commence. The presence of Gen. J. E. Johnston will infuse new confidence in our soldiers, and the country will feel measurably relieved when it is generally known that he is to command in person at so important a point. The following is a copy of the dispatch of Gen. Johnston: Camp Between Livingston and Brownsville, May 18, 1863. Gen. S. Cooper: Lieutenant General Pemberton was attacked by the enemy on the morning of the 15th inst., near Edwards's Depot, and, after nine hours fighting, was compelled to fall bf Gen. Johnston: Camp Between Livingston and Brownsville, May 18, 1863. Gen. S. Cooper: Lieutenant General Pemberton was attacked by the enemy on the morning of the 15th inst., near Edwards's Depot, and, after nine hours fighting, was compelled to fall back behind Big Black. J. E. Johnston, General Commanding.
Railroad, between the Big Black river and the city of Jackson. To engage the enemy our forces had to leave their strong positions around Vicksburg, and cross that stream, which runs in a southwesterly direction, and empties into the Mississippi some thirty miles below the city. After the battle our forces fell back behind the Big Black, on the Vicksburg side of which our line of fortifications commence. The presence of Gen. J. E. Johnston will infuse new confidence in our soldiers, and the country will feel measurably relieved when it is generally known that he is to command in person at so important a point. The following is a copy of the dispatch of Gen. Johnston: Camp Between Livingston and Brownsville, May 18, 1863. Gen. S. Cooper: Lieutenant General Pemberton was attacked by the enemy on the morning of the 15th inst., near Edwards's Depot, and, after nine hours fighting, was compelled to fall back behind Big Black. J. E. Johnston, General Commanding.
May 18th, 1863 AD (search for this): article 6
Railroad, between the Big Black river and the city of Jackson. To engage the enemy our forces had to leave their strong positions around Vicksburg, and cross that stream, which runs in a southwesterly direction, and empties into the Mississippi some thirty miles below the city. After the battle our forces fell back behind the Big Black, on the Vicksburg side of which our line of fortifications commence. The presence of Gen. J. E. Johnston will infuse new confidence in our soldiers, and the country will feel measurably relieved when it is generally known that he is to command in person at so important a point. The following is a copy of the dispatch of Gen. Johnston: Camp Between Livingston and Brownsville, May 18, 1863. Gen. S. Cooper: Lieutenant General Pemberton was attacked by the enemy on the morning of the 15th inst., near Edwards's Depot, and, after nine hours fighting, was compelled to fall back behind Big Black. J. E. Johnston, General Commanding.