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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: May 21, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Plymouth, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
Gen. Burnside most graciously ordered their lifeless bodies to be"delivered to their friends! " That man, at the beginning of the war, put on the sir of the humane gentleman; but finding that not popular with the Yankees, he essays now a shorter road to favor and thrift in the Northern mind, by throwing off all hypocrisy and becoming the unrelieved and unmitigated brute. He sees how Butler has thriven in Yankee esteem — how he has firmly fixed himself on a granite base on the very rock of Plymouth, where he cannot be shaken or displaced by his crimes against justice and humanity. He has therefore become his imitator, and is rising in the popular scale along with him Humiliated and disgraced by his failures on the Potomac, he finds a malicious satisfaction, as well as a facite way of lifting himself up in Yankeedom, in issuing inhuman and bloody orders against all sympathizers with the men whose valor and skill in arms drove him in disgrace from the battle-field. Safely ensconced in
Sandusky, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 1
Burnside's Military Executions. "They were both killed by the first fire, and died without a struggle. Their bodies were delivered to their friends from Kentucky by order of Gen. Burnside!" Thus read the telegram from Sandusky, Ohio, announcing the execution of T. P. McGraw and Wm. Corbin, who were sentenced to death, we believe, for endeavoring to enlist men in Kentucky for the Southern cause. They "died without a struggle," is the consoling announcement; and Gen. Burnside most graciously ordered their lifeless bodies to be"delivered to their friends! " That man, at the beginning of the war, put on the sir of the humane gentleman; but finding that not popular with the Yankees, he essays now a shorter road to favor and thrift in the Northern mind, by throwing off all hypocrisy and becoming the unrelieved and unmitigated brute. He sees how Butler has thriven in Yankee esteem — how he has firmly fixed himself on a granite base on the very rock of Plymouth, where he cannot be sha
Burnside's Military Executions. "They were both killed by the first fire, and died without a struggle. Their bodies were delivered to their friends from Kentucky by order of Gen. Burnside!" Thus read the telegram from Sandusky, Ohio, announcinGen. Burnside!" Thus read the telegram from Sandusky, Ohio, announcing the execution of T. P. McGraw and Wm. Corbin, who were sentenced to death, we believe, for endeavoring to enlist men in Kentucky for the Southern cause. They "died without a struggle," is the consoling announcement; and Gen. Burnside most graciouGen. Burnside most graciously ordered their lifeless bodies to be"delivered to their friends! " That man, at the beginning of the war, put on the sir of the humane gentleman; but finding that not popular with the Yankees, he essays now a shorter road to favor and thrift in tm present peril — a quiet and safe revenge, comforting to a coward's heart and grateful to a coward's feelings. But Burnside is only performing the duty assigned him by his master at Washington.--Like the execrated headsman, he is the mere instr
t men in Kentucky for the Southern cause. They "died without a struggle," is the consoling announcement; and Gen. Burnside most graciously ordered their lifeless bodies to be"delivered to their friends! " That man, at the beginning of the war, put on the sir of the humane gentleman; but finding that not popular with the Yankees, he essays now a shorter road to favor and thrift in the Northern mind, by throwing off all hypocrisy and becoming the unrelieved and unmitigated brute. He sees how Butler has thriven in Yankee esteem — how he has firmly fixed himself on a granite base on the very rock of Plymouth, where he cannot be shaken or displaced by his crimes against justice and humanity. He has therefore become his imitator, and is rising in the popular scale along with him Humiliated and disgraced by his failures on the Potomac, he finds a malicious satisfaction, as well as a facite way of lifting himself up in Yankeedom, in issuing inhuman and bloody orders against all sympathizers
T. P. McGraw (search for this): article 1
Burnside's Military Executions. "They were both killed by the first fire, and died without a struggle. Their bodies were delivered to their friends from Kentucky by order of Gen. Burnside!" Thus read the telegram from Sandusky, Ohio, announcing the execution of T. P. McGraw and Wm. Corbin, who were sentenced to death, we believe, for endeavoring to enlist men in Kentucky for the Southern cause. They "died without a struggle," is the consoling announcement; and Gen. Burnside most graciously ordered their lifeless bodies to be"delivered to their friends! " That man, at the beginning of the war, put on the sir of the humane gentleman; but finding that not popular with the Yankees, he essays now a shorter road to favor and thrift in the Northern mind, by throwing off all hypocrisy and becoming the unrelieved and unmitigated brute. He sees how Butler has thriven in Yankee esteem — how he has firmly fixed himself on a granite base on the very rock of Plymouth, where he cannot be sha
William Corbin (search for this): article 1
Burnside's Military Executions. "They were both killed by the first fire, and died without a struggle. Their bodies were delivered to their friends from Kentucky by order of Gen. Burnside!" Thus read the telegram from Sandusky, Ohio, announcing the execution of T. P. McGraw and Wm. Corbin, who were sentenced to death, we believe, for endeavoring to enlist men in Kentucky for the Southern cause. They "died without a struggle," is the consoling announcement; and Gen. Burnside most graciously ordered their lifeless bodies to be"delivered to their friends! " That man, at the beginning of the war, put on the sir of the humane gentleman; but finding that not popular with the Yankees, he essays now a shorter road to favor and thrift in the Northern mind, by throwing off all hypocrisy and becoming the unrelieved and unmitigated brute. He sees how Butler has thriven in Yankee esteem — how he has firmly fixed himself on a granite base on the very rock of Plymouth, where he cannot be sha