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Puritan (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 1
h is right, while they proclaim against any infringement of individual right at the North--then they are after all Yankees! Nothing more. Governor Seymour and Hunt are no better than Sumner and Chase and Sherman — may, not so good — not even so good as Burnside. They are consistent. They are for the despotism — for submission to its authority everywhere and all the time, and particularly for the crushing of the rebellion. Thus viewing the inconsistency of these persons — their truly Puritan position of selfishness — utter indifference to the wrongs and outrages of others so long as they are not troubled or their rights are not invaded — thus regarding them, we should be glad to hear that Lincoln had put them promptly under arrest. They richly merit it. A coup d'elat of that sort would be a capital thing for Lincoln, and a very just commending to their own lips of the poisoned chalice which they offer to the South! Still there were things notable in the speeches, and
Patrick Henry (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
others so long as they are not troubled or their rights are not invaded — thus regarding them, we should be glad to hear that Lincoln had put them promptly under arrest. They richly merit it. A coup d'elat of that sort would be a capital thing for Lincoln, and a very just commending to their own lips of the poisoned chalice which they offer to the South! Still there were things notable in the speeches, and the running commentary upon them by the multitudes. One gentleman emulated Patrick Henry, and commended striking examples in historic retribution to the meditation of Lincoln. The interpolations of the masses were pithy. It may be that the ideas inculcated by the scene and the sayings may come to something. Time will tell. But all in the South must desire to see put to the test that bold assertion of Hunt, on the "house tops," that no New Yorker "shall be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without process of law." It is a sort of dare to Lincoln, uttered rather taun
ake fair weather with Lincoln, Seymour or Co. are not only dishonest, but too cowardly to resist even were he to put the rope around their necks! If they are sincere, and really think the attempt to establish a grinding despotism in the South is right, while they proclaim against any infringement of individual right at the North--then they are after all Yankees! Nothing more. Governor Seymour and Hunt are no better than Sumner and Chase and Sherman — may, not so good — not even so good as Burnside. They are consistent. They are for the despotism — for submission to its authority everywhere and all the time, and particularly for the crushing of the rebellion. Thus viewing the inconsistency of these persons — their truly Puritan position of selfishness — utter indifference to the wrongs and outrages of others so long as they are not troubled or their rights are not invaded — thus regarding them, we should be glad to hear that Lincoln had put them promptly under arrest. The
mour and others think them just? If pretended, and merely thrown out to make fair weather with Lincoln, Seymour or Co. are not only dishonest, but too cowardly to resist even were he to put the rope troubled or their rights are not invaded — thus regarding them, we should be glad to hear that Lincoln had put them promptly under arrest. They richly merit it. A coup d'elat of that sort would be a capital thing for Lincoln, and a very just commending to their own lips of the poisoned chalice which they offer to the South! Still there were things notable in the speeches, and the running ted Patrick Henry, and commended striking examples in historic retribution to the meditation of Lincoln. The interpolations of the masses were pithy. It may be that the ideas inculcated by the scenall be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without process of law." It is a sort of dare to Lincoln, uttered rather tauntingly, and calculated to provoke him. He may try the issue tendered, and t
a very just commending to their own lips of the poisoned chalice which they offer to the South! Still there were things notable in the speeches, and the running commentary upon them by the multitudes. One gentleman emulated Patrick Henry, and commended striking examples in historic retribution to the meditation of Lincoln. The interpolations of the masses were pithy. It may be that the ideas inculcated by the scene and the sayings may come to something. Time will tell. But all in the South must desire to see put to the test that bold assertion of Hunt, on the "house tops," that no New Yorker "shall be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without process of law." It is a sort of dare to Lincoln, uttered rather tauntingly, and calculated to provoke him. He may try the issue tendered, and then we shall see whether New York is, as Mr. Brooks said, "free"--we shall see whether a State so willing to inflict an outrage on others is brave enough to defend herself. We doubt it.
r and others think them just? If pretended, and merely thrown out to make fair weather with Lincoln, Seymour or Co. are not only dishonest, but too cowardly to resist even were he to put the rope around their necks! If they are sincere, and really think the attempt to establish a grinding despotism in the South is right, while they proclaim against any infringement of individual right at the North--then they are after all Yankees! Nothing more. Governor Seymour and Hunt are no better than Sumner and Chase and Sherman — may, not so good — not even so good as Burnside. They are consistent. They are for the despotism — for submission to its authority everywhere and all the time, and particularly for the crushing of the rebellion. Thus viewing the inconsistency of these persons — their truly Puritan position of selfishness — utter indifference to the wrongs and outrages of others so long as they are not troubled or their rights are not invaded — thus regarding them, we shoul
m just? If pretended, and merely thrown out to make fair weather with Lincoln, Seymour or Co. are not only dishonest, but too cowardly to resist even were he to put the rope around their necks! If they are sincere, and really think the attempt to establish a grinding despotism in the South is right, while they proclaim against any infringement of individual right at the North--then they are after all Yankees! Nothing more. Governor Seymour and Hunt are no better than Sumner and Chase and Sherman — may, not so good — not even so good as Burnside. They are consistent. They are for the despotism — for submission to its authority everywhere and all the time, and particularly for the crushing of the rebellion. Thus viewing the inconsistency of these persons — their truly Puritan position of selfishness — utter indifference to the wrongs and outrages of others so long as they are not troubled or their rights are not invaded — thus regarding them, we should be glad to hear tha
Horatio Seymour (search for this): article 1
titution, for furnishing liberally men and means to crush the rebellion in the South! Even Governor Seymour--who declares that if the arrest and trial of Vallandigham were approved by the Administratr it is to enslave the South or enslave the North? If it is only to enslave the South, why Governor Seymour is willing to go on — according to the Administration--"a generous support in "its conduct North, and to demand the universal execration! Are these distinctions hypocritical, or do Governor Seymour and others think them just? If pretended, and merely thrown out to make fair weather with Lincoln, Seymour or Co. are not only dishonest, but too cowardly to resist even were he to put the rope around their necks! If they are sincere, and really think the attempt to establish a grinding ringement of individual right at the North--then they are after all Yankees! Nothing more. Governor Seymour and Hunt are no better than Sumner and Chase and Sherman — may, not so good — not even so g<
Clement L. Vallandigham (search for this): article 1
ce more fully in our paper of this morning the proceedings of the immense meetings of citizens in New York city, on the subject of the arrest and sentence of Mr. Vallandigham, of Ohio. The spirit and resolves of that meeting were bold and decided so far as words can make them; whether they will be sustained hereafter remains to b Constitution, for furnishing liberally men and means to crush the rebellion in the South! Even Governor Seymour--who declares that if the arrest and trial of Vallandigham were approved by the Administration, and sustained by the people, it "establishes military despotism"--says, "having given it (the Administration) a generous swar, we pause to see what kind of Government it is for which we are asked to pour out our blood and our treasures," and he continues to say, that its action in Vallandigham's case "will determine in the minds of more than "one half the people of the loyal States whether this war is waged to put down rebellion at the South or destr
Washington Hunt (search for this): article 1
to "destroy "the free institutions at the North," he'll none of it — there must be resistance! So, too, with Mr. Washington Hunt. He says: "It is for the perpetuation of free constitutional Government, and for this only, that the country has iberty!" So, so! It is all right so long as the despotism is marshalling its hosts against the liberties of the South. Mr. Hunt and his co-laborers will contribute their "best blood" and the vast resources of the country for that meritorious purposst any infringement of individual right at the North--then they are after all Yankees! Nothing more. Governor Seymour and Hunt are no better than Sumner and Chase and Sherman — may, not so good — not even so good as Burnside. They are consistent. gs may come to something. Time will tell. But all in the South must desire to see put to the test that bold assertion of Hunt, on the "house tops," that no New Yorker "shall be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without process of law." It is <
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