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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 28, 1863., [Electronic resource].

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ll not have a Governor opposed to the Administration, and, if it is necessary, the casting of a vote for him next fall will be prohibited. So that Lincoln has three courses before him. He can yield to the New York remonstrances and pardon Vallandigham, or he can, pursuing the policy of arbitrary arrests, seize the persons of those leaders who have reprobated the proceedings in Vallandigham's case, or he may, just for the present, be content with having put out of the way a dangerous foe, and await to see the commotion occasioned by his capture spend itself. We now think it probable that he will pursue the last mentioned policy. If the party who, with Governor Seymour, think that the case of Vallandigham proves the existence of a grinding military despotism at the North, should take any steps with the view of resisting that despotism, then Lincoln will have to make another swoop amongst them. Will they make any movement with that view? It remains to be seen. We doubt it.
Vallandigham and Lincoln. The arrest and exile of Vallandigham was prompted by the idea that he was the bright particular star of the opposition in the Northwest, and to extinguish him would leave the opposition sky in darkness. Thus far the not complained and submitted, threatened and acquiesced, time and again? All their clamors have terminated in supplying Lincoln with all the men, all the money, all the authority, that he waned. What reason has he to fear them now? The arrestto the Administration, and, if it is necessary, the casting of a vote for him next fall will be prohibited. So that Lincoln has three courses before him. He can yield to the New York remonstrances and pardon Vallandigham, or he can, pursuing thnce of a grinding military despotism at the North, should take any steps with the view of resisting that despotism, then Lincoln will have to make another swoop amongst them. Will they make any movement with that view? It remains to be seen. We d
Vallandigham (search for this): article 1
Vallandigham and Lincoln. The arrest and exile of Vallandigham was prompted by the idea that he was the bright particular star of the opVallandigham was prompted by the idea that he was the bright particular star of the opposition in the Northwest, and to extinguish him would leave the opposition sky in darkness. Thus far the calculation is not disappointed. T, content themselves with words merely he can let them subside. Vallandigham and his case will in that way disappear like something beneath t waned. What reason has he to fear them now? The arrest of Vallandigham is evidently intended to crush the spirit of opposition in the Nefore him. He can yield to the New York remonstrances and pardon Vallandigham, or he can, pursuing the policy of arbitrary arrests, seize the persons of those leaders who have reprobated the proceedings in Vallandigham's case, or he may, just for the present, be content with having p If the party who, with Governor Seymour, think that the case of Vallandigham proves the existence of a grinding military despotism at the Nor
pposition sky in darkness. Thus far the calculation is not disappointed. There has been no light in the Heaven in that quarter since he was banished, save one brief display in Indianapolis, which did not exhibit the deliberation and force of unterrified freemen aroused by a sense of outrage. With this specimen of what he can do, the tyrant may follow the plan of simply waiting to see what those who oppose him may do. If Voorbees, Merrick, and others in the Northwest and Seymour, Hunt, Brooks, and others in the East, content themselves with words merely he can let them subside. Vallandigham and his case will in that way disappear like something beneath the water, the disturbance on the surface soon terminating in a smooth sea! This calculation would certainly be not unpractical or opposed to good judgment; for have not the Northern people submitted to every sort of outrage upon the Constitution and personal liberty, and arbitrary arrests without number? Have they not compl
e the opposition sky in darkness. Thus far the calculation is not disappointed. There has been no light in the Heaven in that quarter since he was banished, save one brief display in Indianapolis, which did not exhibit the deliberation and force of unterrified freemen aroused by a sense of outrage. With this specimen of what he can do, the tyrant may follow the plan of simply waiting to see what those who oppose him may do. If Voorbees, Merrick, and others in the Northwest and Seymour, Hunt, Brooks, and others in the East, content themselves with words merely he can let them subside. Vallandigham and his case will in that way disappear like something beneath the water, the disturbance on the surface soon terminating in a smooth sea! This calculation would certainly be not unpractical or opposed to good judgment; for have not the Northern people submitted to every sort of outrage upon the Constitution and personal liberty, and arbitrary arrests without number? Have they no
the Northwest, and to extinguish him would leave the opposition sky in darkness. Thus far the calculation is not disappointed. There has been no light in the Heaven in that quarter since he was banished, save one brief display in Indianapolis, which did not exhibit the deliberation and force of unterrified freemen aroused by a sense of outrage. With this specimen of what he can do, the tyrant may follow the plan of simply waiting to see what those who oppose him may do. If Voorbees, Merrick, and others in the Northwest and Seymour, Hunt, Brooks, and others in the East, content themselves with words merely he can let them subside. Vallandigham and his case will in that way disappear like something beneath the water, the disturbance on the surface soon terminating in a smooth sea! This calculation would certainly be not unpractical or opposed to good judgment; for have not the Northern people submitted to every sort of outrage upon the Constitution and personal liberty, an
Indianapolis (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 1
Vallandigham and Lincoln. The arrest and exile of Vallandigham was prompted by the idea that he was the bright particular star of the opposition in the Northwest, and to extinguish him would leave the opposition sky in darkness. Thus far the calculation is not disappointed. There has been no light in the Heaven in that quarter since he was banished, save one brief display in Indianapolis, which did not exhibit the deliberation and force of unterrified freemen aroused by a sense of outrage. With this specimen of what he can do, the tyrant may follow the plan of simply waiting to see what those who oppose him may do. If Voorbees, Merrick, and others in the Northwest and Seymour, Hunt, Brooks, and others in the East, content themselves with words merely he can let them subside. Vallandigham and his case will in that way disappear like something beneath the water, the disturbance on the surface soon terminating in a smooth sea! This calculation would certainly be not unp
United States (United States) (search for this): article 2
of the North has a day of terror before it. Whether or not the South may be able to carry the war into the enemy's country, nevertheless war at their own hearthstones, bloody and desolating war, is as certain as any future event. If the United States have steered clear of that calamity since the establishment of American Independence, (the last war with England and the Mexican war leaving their own territory,) they cannot expect a long continuance of such good fortune. No nation ever hasope of it which is carrying on such a demoniac invasion as this of the South. One of the reasons most urged by the North against "disunion" is that it will breed continual wars. Do they expect to escape the common curse of humanity? Is the United States to be the solitary spot on the globe, the single nation in all history, which has never known war at its own firesides? Are they, above all, who are the most heartless and cruel of mankind, to avoid a doom which the most virtuous and valiant
We get the following remarkable item through Harper's Weekly, which a friend has favored us with. Can it be possible that old Fuss and Feathers resists Lincoln's income tax? He loves money with sufficient devotion to make him hate the tax, we know; but then, situated as he is, to object to it at all would be an act of great indiscretion, not to say ingratitude. He stayed at the North for the sake of his salary. The Yankee Government paid him liberally; it gave him the liberty to retire from service and continued his full pay. To refuse to pay the tax now looks most ugly. Oh, General Scott! when will you stop falling? --The paragraph is as follows: "The New York Post has the following items. 'We cannot but regard it as an unfortunate event that Gen. Scott protests against the payment of the income tax, for his is the first case of formal resistance to an enactment which, as Commissioner Lewis observes, is required by the imperious necessities of the public treasury.' "
General Scott on the income tax. We get the following remarkable item through Harper's Weekly, which a friend has favored us with. Can it be possible that old Fuss and Feathers resists Lincoln's income tax? He loves money with sufficient devotion to make him hate the tax, we know; but then, situated as he is, to object to iee Government paid him liberally; it gave him the liberty to retire from service and continued his full pay. To refuse to pay the tax now looks most ugly. Oh, General Scott! when will you stop falling? --The paragraph is as follows: "The New York Post has the following items. 'We cannot but regard it as an unfortunate event "The New York Post has the following items. 'We cannot but regard it as an unfortunate event that Gen. Scott protests against the payment of the income tax, for his is the first case of formal resistance to an enactment which, as Commissioner Lewis observes, is required by the imperious necessities of the public treasury.' "
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