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North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 4
bearing arms, the Yankees would readily ascertain the fact, and come swooping down upon Richmond, burn the bridges, and perhaps carry off some important prisoners. A contemporary suggests that they might even rush far to the interior, and that even the inland town of Danville — considered the safest place in the Commonwealth — might be reached by the invading hordes. When we bear in mind the long procession of pedlar wagons which in days gone by passed through Danville on their way to North Carolina, we are not without misgiving that the pedlars on horseback may take the same route with the ancestral pedlars in wagons. But to be forewarned is, or ought to be, to be forearmed. The Yankee horsemen are never coming when the people are prepared for their reception, and in a thickly wooded country it is easy, with a small body of resolute men, to keep off a large body of cavalry, and make their enterprise a disastrous failure. There are, besides, modes of obstructing the progress of c
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
es would readily ascertain the fact, and come swooping down upon Richmond, burn the bridges, and perhaps carry off some important prisoners. A contemporary suggests that they might even rush far to the interior, and that even the inland town of Danville — considered the safest place in the Commonwealth — might be reached by the invading hordes. When we bear in mind the long procession of pedlar wagons which in days gone by passed through Danville on their way to North Carolina, we are not withDanville on their way to North Carolina, we are not without misgiving that the pedlars on horseback may take the same route with the ancestral pedlars in wagons. But to be forewarned is, or ought to be, to be forearmed. The Yankee horsemen are never coming when the people are prepared for their reception, and in a thickly wooded country it is easy, with a small body of resolute men, to keep off a large body of cavalry, and make their enterprise a disastrous failure. There are, besides, modes of obstructing the progress of cavalry as well as of gun