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Victor Emanuel (search for this): article 2
gation they have no belief — her independence is to be acknowledged and guaranteed. They will say — you have had three years and the resources of the world to end this rebellion. If you cannot do it in that time, you never can. The war is too great an injury to the commerce of the world to go on for an indefinite period. We must interfere for our own interests, and in the cause of humanity and civilization. They will say to you as they will to Russia, as France, at least, will say to Victor Emanuel: This has been going on long enough. It becomes a nuisance and must be put a stop to. "There is another fact you are not to lose right of. Englishmen, as well as others, have pride of opinion. They are not willing to be found in the wrong. Now, there is scarcely an Englishman of either of the great parties, from Derby and Palmerston, Russell and Gladstone, down, who have not committed themselves to the success of the rebellion.--There is scarcely an Englishman of any political re
interfere for our own interests, and in the cause of humanity and civilization. They will say to you as they will to Russia, as France, at least, will say to Victor Emanuel: This has been going on long enough. It becomes a nuisance and must be put a stop to. "There is another fact you are not to lose right of. Englishmen, as well as others, have pride of opinion. They are not willing to be found in the wrong. Now, there is scarcely an Englishman of either of the great parties, from Derby and Palmerston, Russell and Gladstone, down, who have not committed themselves to the success of the rebellion.--There is scarcely an Englishman of any political reputation who has not expressed, over and over again, the opinion, not to say wish, that the National Government can never conquer the rebel States. The Liberal Press — I mean the Times, Morning Post, Saturday Review, &c.--have been as decided and as contemptuous in the matter as the Herald, or John Bull, or Press. The nation, wit
European intervention. European intervention — that ignis fatuus which was allowed to operate so injuriously to our cause in the beginning of this war, and the probability of which seems as remote as ever — has not yet lost all its terrors for the Yankees. The London correspondent of the New York Times, under the date of May 9, thus gives expression to his fears that something of the sort may yet come to pass. We give his comments upon the subject, without attaching much importance to them, but as an exemplification of the ever-changing currents of public rumor in England: "Quiet as everything now seems with regard to American affairs, there are many signs of a confidence, amounting to certainly, that the American war is not to last much longer. The Government is about to employ the people of Lancashire on public works, so that they may not emigrate, but be ready to spin the cotton when it comes. A line of steamers of 3,000 to 4,000 tons is being built expressly to bri
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