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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 2
War Fictions. It would make a very interesting book, if all the false rumors and reports that have been started since the beginning of the war could be collected and published in a single volume. In the beginning of our troubles, two Maryland gentlemen arrested Col. Lander and another Federal officer, who were on their way from Washington to Annapolis, with dispatches, and took them before Gov Hicks, of Maryland, by whom they were of course at once discharged. The story of this simple ocMaryland, by whom they were of course at once discharged. The story of this simple occurrence, by the time that it reached Richmond, assumed a character that set the whole town wild with excitement. Bulletin boards were crowded, and from lip to lip flew the astounding news. The New York 7th Regiment--such was the form which the arrest of Lander had assumed — was passing from Annapolis to Washington, when it was ambuscaded by a band of gallant Baltimoreans and "cut all to pieces." The scene was described with great partiality; the cars, containing the hapless 7th Regiment, was
War Fictions. It would make a very interesting book, if all the false rumors and reports that have been started since the beginning of the war could be collected and published in a single volume. In the beginning of our troubles, two Maryland gentlemen arrested Col. Lander and another Federal officer, who were on their way from Washington to Annapolis, with dispatches, and took them before Gov Hicks, of Maryland, by whom they were of course at once discharged. The story of this simple occurrence, by the time that it reached Richmond, assumed a character that set the whole town wild with excitement. Bulletin boards were crowded, and from lip to lip flew the astounding news. The New York 7th Regiment--such was the form which the arrest of Lander had assumed — was passing from Annapolis to Washington, when it was ambuscaded by a band of gallant Baltimoreans and "cut all to pieces." The scene was described with great partiality; the cars, containing the hapless 7th Regiment, was
uld make a very interesting book, if all the false rumors and reports that have been started since the beginning of the war could be collected and published in a single volume. In the beginning of our troubles, two Maryland gentlemen arrested Col. Lander and another Federal officer, who were on their way from Washington to Annapolis, with dispatches, and took them before Gov Hicks, of Maryland, by whom they were of course at once discharged. The story of this simple occurrence, by the time that it reached Richmond, assumed a character that set the whole town wild with excitement. Bulletin boards were crowded, and from lip to lip flew the astounding news. The New York 7th Regiment--such was the form which the arrest of Lander had assumed — was passing from Annapolis to Washington, when it was ambuscaded by a band of gallant Baltimoreans and "cut all to pieces." The scene was described with great partiality; the cars, containing the hapless 7th Regiment, was made to run off the trac