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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 12, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Culpeper (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
The fight in Culpeper county. The reports of the late fight in Culpeper county, brought down by passengers on the Central train yesterday evening, are hardly more satisfactory than those which had previously reached us. That our forces were surprised there seems no longer any reason to doubt, and that they fought gallantly after they recovered from the confusion into which they were at first thrown is also certain. It is equally certain that the battle terminated with the repulse of the eCulpeper county, brought down by passengers on the Central train yesterday evening, are hardly more satisfactory than those which had previously reached us. That our forces were surprised there seems no longer any reason to doubt, and that they fought gallantly after they recovered from the confusion into which they were at first thrown is also certain. It is equally certain that the battle terminated with the repulse of the enemy and the advantage on our side, the enemy's loss in killed and wounded, and in the number of prisoners captured, being considerably greater than that sustained by our forces. The greater portion of our wounded have been sent back to Gordonsville, where about 125 had been received up to 12 o'clock yesterday. The whole number of wounded in the engagement, it is believed, will amount to from 150 to 200. The number of killed it is thought will not exceed 50. The number of officers slain i
The whole number of wounded in the engagement, it is believed, will amount to from 150 to 200. The number of killed it is thought will not exceed 50. The number of officers slain is greatly out of proportion to the number of men, which is accounted for by their exposing themselves in efforts to rally their commands after the first onset of the enemy. Our whole loss, including prisoners, is put down at between 300 and 400. A passenger who came down on the train says that we had five Colonels killed, but could not recollect any names in addition to those given by us yesterday morning. Among the wounded was Col. A. W. Harman, of the 12th Virginia cavalry, who was shot in the neck. The 10th Virginia cavalry, Col. J. Lucius Davis, bore a prominent part in the tight, and suffered pretty heavily, as did also the 2d North Carolina, Col. Williams. One of the enemy's officers, who came over with a flag of truce on Wednesday, says that their loss in officers amounted to twenty-five.
A. W. Harman (search for this): article 4
The whole number of wounded in the engagement, it is believed, will amount to from 150 to 200. The number of killed it is thought will not exceed 50. The number of officers slain is greatly out of proportion to the number of men, which is accounted for by their exposing themselves in efforts to rally their commands after the first onset of the enemy. Our whole loss, including prisoners, is put down at between 300 and 400. A passenger who came down on the train says that we had five Colonels killed, but could not recollect any names in addition to those given by us yesterday morning. Among the wounded was Col. A. W. Harman, of the 12th Virginia cavalry, who was shot in the neck. The 10th Virginia cavalry, Col. J. Lucius Davis, bore a prominent part in the tight, and suffered pretty heavily, as did also the 2d North Carolina, Col. Williams. One of the enemy's officers, who came over with a flag of truce on Wednesday, says that their loss in officers amounted to twenty-five.
J. Lucius Davis (search for this): article 4
The whole number of wounded in the engagement, it is believed, will amount to from 150 to 200. The number of killed it is thought will not exceed 50. The number of officers slain is greatly out of proportion to the number of men, which is accounted for by their exposing themselves in efforts to rally their commands after the first onset of the enemy. Our whole loss, including prisoners, is put down at between 300 and 400. A passenger who came down on the train says that we had five Colonels killed, but could not recollect any names in addition to those given by us yesterday morning. Among the wounded was Col. A. W. Harman, of the 12th Virginia cavalry, who was shot in the neck. The 10th Virginia cavalry, Col. J. Lucius Davis, bore a prominent part in the tight, and suffered pretty heavily, as did also the 2d North Carolina, Col. Williams. One of the enemy's officers, who came over with a flag of truce on Wednesday, says that their loss in officers amounted to twenty-five.