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Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 1
s army. Rosecrans himself appears to be falling back, which renders this supposition still more probable. We presume that General Bragg will follow him closely, should he be moving, as reported, towards Nashville. An officer lately from Port Hudson reports our loss in the engagement there at six hundred. The negroes in the Yankee army were put in front, and they broke at the first fire. As many of them were killed by the Yankees as by the Confederates. The whereabouts of Kirby Smith is still in doubt, some saying that he crossed at Port Hudson with eighteen thousand men, whilst others contradict the news of his arrival. All accounts continue to agree in describing the Yankee loss before Vicksburg as unprecedentedly large — from thirty to forty thousand killed and wounded being the figures given by some correspondents. Five Yankee Generals are said to have been killed, among them Burbridge, who lately distinguished himself a la Butler, in the Deer Creek expedition,
Joe Johnston (search for this): article 1
The Southwest. The news from the Southwest, received by mail yesterday, represents General Joe Johnston as crossing the Big Black in force, leaving Breckinridge at Jackson. The garrison at Vicksburg is said to be in fine spirits and confident of success. On the other hand, we have good grounds for believing that Grant has been reinforced from Memphis, probably by detachments from Rosecrans's army. Rosecrans himself appears to be falling back, which renders this supposition still more probable. We presume that General Bragg will follow him closely, should he be moving, as reported, towards Nashville. An officer lately from Port Hudson reports our loss in the engagement there at six hundred. The negroes in the Yankee army were put in front, and they broke at the first fire. As many of them were killed by the Yankees as by the Confederates. The whereabouts of Kirby Smith is still in doubt, some saying that he crossed at Port Hudson with eighteen thousand men, whilst
Yankee Generals (search for this): article 1
lle. An officer lately from Port Hudson reports our loss in the engagement there at six hundred. The negroes in the Yankee army were put in front, and they broke at the first fire. As many of them were killed by the Yankees as by the Confederates. The whereabouts of Kirby Smith is still in doubt, some saying that he crossed at Port Hudson with eighteen thousand men, whilst others contradict the news of his arrival. All accounts continue to agree in describing the Yankee loss before Vicksburg as unprecedentedly large — from thirty to forty thousand killed and wounded being the figures given by some correspondents. Five Yankee Generals are said to have been killed, among them Burbridge, who lately distinguished himself a la Butler, in the Deer Creek expedition, visiting private houses and helping himself to plate and jewelry. So far, everything looks promising in that quarter, and a very few days, perhaps hours, will bring us highly exciting news from the Southwest.
ille. An officer lately from Port Hudson reports our loss in the engagement there at six hundred. The negroes in the Yankee army were put in front, and they broke at the first fire. As many of them were killed by the Yankees as by the Confederates. The whereabouts of Kirby Smith is still in doubt, some saying that he crossed at Port Hudson with eighteen thousand men, whilst others contradict the news of his arrival. All accounts continue to agree in describing the Yankee loss before Vicksburg as unprecedentedly large — from thirty to forty thousand killed and wounded being the figures given by some correspondents. Five Yankee Generals are said to have been killed, among them Burbridge, who lately distinguished himself a la Butler, in the Deer Creek expedition, visiting private houses and helping himself to plate and jewelry. So far, everything looks promising in that quarter, and a very few days, perhaps hours, will bring us highly exciting news from the Southwest.
Burbridge (search for this): article 1
lle. An officer lately from Port Hudson reports our loss in the engagement there at six hundred. The negroes in the Yankee army were put in front, and they broke at the first fire. As many of them were killed by the Yankees as by the Confederates. The whereabouts of Kirby Smith is still in doubt, some saying that he crossed at Port Hudson with eighteen thousand men, whilst others contradict the news of his arrival. All accounts continue to agree in describing the Yankee loss before Vicksburg as unprecedentedly large — from thirty to forty thousand killed and wounded being the figures given by some correspondents. Five Yankee Generals are said to have been killed, among them Burbridge, who lately distinguished himself a la Butler, in the Deer Creek expedition, visiting private houses and helping himself to plate and jewelry. So far, everything looks promising in that quarter, and a very few days, perhaps hours, will bring us highly exciting news from the Southwest.
Breckinridge (search for this): article 1
The Southwest. The news from the Southwest, received by mail yesterday, represents General Joe Johnston as crossing the Big Black in force, leaving Breckinridge at Jackson. The garrison at Vicksburg is said to be in fine spirits and confident of success. On the other hand, we have good grounds for believing that Grant has been reinforced from Memphis, probably by detachments from Rosecrans's army. Rosecrans himself appears to be falling back, which renders this supposition still more probable. We presume that General Bragg will follow him closely, should he be moving, as reported, towards Nashville. An officer lately from Port Hudson reports our loss in the engagement there at six hundred. The negroes in the Yankee army were put in front, and they broke at the first fire. As many of them were killed by the Yankees as by the Confederates. The whereabouts of Kirby Smith is still in doubt, some saying that he crossed at Port Hudson with eighteen thousand men, whilst
Rosecrans (search for this): article 1
leaving Breckinridge at Jackson. The garrison at Vicksburg is said to be in fine spirits and confident of success. On the other hand, we have good grounds for believing that Grant has been reinforced from Memphis, probably by detachments from Rosecrans's army. Rosecrans himself appears to be falling back, which renders this supposition still more probable. We presume that General Bragg will follow him closely, should he be moving, as reported, towards Nashville. An officer lately from Rosecrans himself appears to be falling back, which renders this supposition still more probable. We presume that General Bragg will follow him closely, should he be moving, as reported, towards Nashville. An officer lately from Port Hudson reports our loss in the engagement there at six hundred. The negroes in the Yankee army were put in front, and they broke at the first fire. As many of them were killed by the Yankees as by the Confederates. The whereabouts of Kirby Smith is still in doubt, some saying that he crossed at Port Hudson with eighteen thousand men, whilst others contradict the news of his arrival. All accounts continue to agree in describing the Yankee loss before Vicksburg as unprecedentedly
The Southwest. The news from the Southwest, received by mail yesterday, represents General Joe Johnston as crossing the Big Black in force, leaving Breckinridge at Jackson. The garrison at Vicksburg is said to be in fine spirits and confident of success. On the other hand, we have good grounds for believing that Grant has been reinforced from Memphis, probably by detachments from Rosecrans's army. Rosecrans himself appears to be falling back, which renders this supposition still more probable. We presume that General Bragg will follow him closely, should he be moving, as reported, towards Nashville. An officer lately from Port Hudson reports our loss in the engagement there at six hundred. The negroes in the Yankee army were put in front, and they broke at the first fire. As many of them were killed by the Yankees as by the Confederates. The whereabouts of Kirby Smith is still in doubt, some saying that he crossed at Port Hudson with eighteen thousand men, whilst
om the Southwest, received by mail yesterday, represents General Joe Johnston as crossing the Big Black in force, leaving Breckinridge at Jackson. The garrison at Vicksburg is said to be in fine spirits and confident of success. On the other hand, we have good grounds for believing that Grant has been reinforced from Memphis, probably by detachments from Rosecrans's army. Rosecrans himself appears to be falling back, which renders this supposition still more probable. We presume that General Bragg will follow him closely, should he be moving, as reported, towards Nashville. An officer lately from Port Hudson reports our loss in the engagement there at six hundred. The negroes in the Yankee army were put in front, and they broke at the first fire. As many of them were killed by the Yankees as by the Confederates. The whereabouts of Kirby Smith is still in doubt, some saying that he crossed at Port Hudson with eighteen thousand men, whilst others contradict the news of h
Kirby Smith (search for this): article 1
ans's army. Rosecrans himself appears to be falling back, which renders this supposition still more probable. We presume that General Bragg will follow him closely, should he be moving, as reported, towards Nashville. An officer lately from Port Hudson reports our loss in the engagement there at six hundred. The negroes in the Yankee army were put in front, and they broke at the first fire. As many of them were killed by the Yankees as by the Confederates. The whereabouts of Kirby Smith is still in doubt, some saying that he crossed at Port Hudson with eighteen thousand men, whilst others contradict the news of his arrival. All accounts continue to agree in describing the Yankee loss before Vicksburg as unprecedentedly large — from thirty to forty thousand killed and wounded being the figures given by some correspondents. Five Yankee Generals are said to have been killed, among them Burbridge, who lately distinguished himself a la Butler, in the Deer Creek expediti