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Washington (search for this): article 12
miles in a southerly direction, and affords a fine drill ground. It is rumored here that the enemy are massing a large force at Diascon Bridge, about ten miles above Williamsburg. If such prove to be the case there may be some stirring news expected from this neighborhood soon. The 4th army corps is now in splendid condition. Gen. Keyes is ready and only too anxious for an opportunity to strike the rebels a telling blow. Fernando Wood's interview with Lincoln, A telegram from Washington to the New York Tribune gives the following about Fernando Wood's interview with Lincoln: Fernando Wood had a long interview with the President and Secretary of War to-day.--It is understood that he says that he reiterated the opinions expressed in his last speech at New York, and urged that the Government ought to do the things that make for peace by instantly proposing a cessation of hostilities. When asked what assurances he had from the South that propositions looking to peace wo
bout three-quarters of an hour, and was received with general favor. Among the sentiments of the audience elicited by the reading were groans and hisses for President Lincoln, Burnside and Butler, cheers for Vallandigham and McClellan, hisses for the Emancipation Proclamation, prolonged and nearly cheers for peace, groans for mili now in splendid condition. Gen. Keyes is ready and only too anxious for an opportunity to strike the rebels a telling blow. Fernando Wood's interview with Lincoln, A telegram from Washington to the New York Tribune gives the following about Fernando Wood's interview with Lincoln: Fernando Wood had a long interview Lincoln: Fernando Wood had a long interview with the President and Secretary of War to-day.--It is understood that he says that he reiterated the opinions expressed in his last speech at New York, and urged that the Government ought to do the things that make for peace by instantly proposing a cessation of hostilities. When asked what assurances he had from the South that p
re being brought here by transports; the last regiment leaves there to-day. West Point is a very important position to hold, and the troops while there had so effectually fortified the place as to make it almost impregnable; but the land is very low and marany, lying as it does between two rivers, which, coupled with the excessively hot weather during the last month, made it so unhealthy as to be unpatentable. I understand that the division from West Point now commanded by General Gordon (Gen. Ord having been assigned to some command in the West) is to remain with the 4th army corps, under the command of Major-General Keyes, as the term of service of several of the nine months conscript regiments that are here will expire in July. The addition of so many troops gives quite a lively appearance to Yerkle we again, which has been very quiet the post and The are on a near the York river, just below the fort, where there is a salt-water brease constantly blowing from the river, wh
L. C. Turner (search for this): article 12
another batch of people South. The regulations for their obtaining passports are published as follows in the Washington papers: First.--All applications for passes to go South must be made in writing and verified by oath, addressed to Major L. C. Turner, Judge Advocate, Washington, D. C., as follows: I, A — B--, applicant for a pass to go to City Point, Virginia, and now residing at--, do solemnly swear that, if said pass be granted, I will not take any property excepting my wearing e received on the boat at City Point and taken to Annapolis, and every adult person coming North will be required to take and subscribe to the oath of allegiance to the Government of the United States before the boat leaves Fortress Monroe. L. C. Turner, Judge Advocate. The meeting of the peace Democrats in New York — resolutions passed. As a part of the history of this war we make room for the resolutions adopted by a meeting of the peace Democrats of New York on the 3d, a sketch o
e it so unhealthy as to be unpatentable. I understand that the division from West Point now commanded by General Gordon (Gen. Ord having been assigned to some command in the West) is to remain with the 4th army corps, under the command of Major-General Keyes, as the term of service of several of the nine months conscript regiments that are here will expire in July. The addition of so many troops gives quite a lively appearance to Yerkle we again, which has been very quiet the post and The at the enemy are massing a large force at Diascon Bridge, about ten miles above Williamsburg. If such prove to be the case there may be some stirring news expected from this neighborhood soon. The 4th army corps is now in splendid condition. Gen. Keyes is ready and only too anxious for an opportunity to strike the rebels a telling blow. Fernando Wood's interview with Lincoln, A telegram from Washington to the New York Tribune gives the following about Fernando Wood's interview with
courts martial of citizens, and cheers for the proposition for a Convention to take preliminary stops to secure peace. The greens and black for the President and the cheers for Vallandigham and peace were specially viscous. On motion of Mr. Flanders, the resolutions were adopted, after which Mr. Flanders, on behalf of the Committee on Invitations, read letters of regret for non-attendance from Hon Thomas H. Seymour of Connecticut, Hon. James A. Bayard of Delaware, and Hon. Willard SaulsbuMr. Flanders, on behalf of the Committee on Invitations, read letters of regret for non-attendance from Hon Thomas H. Seymour of Connecticut, Hon. James A. Bayard of Delaware, and Hon. Willard Saulsbury of Delaware, all of which endorsed the peace movement, and elicited unusual approbation. The speech of Fernando Wood was the boldest and ablest of the occasion. Its tenor may be inferred from the following reasons which he assigned why the war should cease: 1. The war should cease because it should never have commenced, in as much as there is no coercive military power in the Federal Government as against the States, which are sovereign, and in possession of all power not delegat
James A. Bayard (search for this): article 12
nd nearly cheers for peace, groans for military courts martial of citizens, and cheers for the proposition for a Convention to take preliminary stops to secure peace. The greens and black for the President and the cheers for Vallandigham and peace were specially viscous. On motion of Mr. Flanders, the resolutions were adopted, after which Mr. Flanders, on behalf of the Committee on Invitations, read letters of regret for non-attendance from Hon Thomas H. Seymour of Connecticut, Hon. James A. Bayard of Delaware, and Hon. Willard Saulsbury of Delaware, all of which endorsed the peace movement, and elicited unusual approbation. The speech of Fernando Wood was the boldest and ablest of the occasion. Its tenor may be inferred from the following reasons which he assigned why the war should cease: 1. The war should cease because it should never have commenced, in as much as there is no coercive military power in the Federal Government as against the States, which are sover
and remarked that a City Judge standing up at that time and crying "Peace, peace," it was time for him to say "War, war to the bitter end." Here several parties attempted to speak at a time, and the utmost confusion prevailed, Judge McCunn being carried round the room by several of his men. The Mayor immediately left, and the proceedings terminated after several other volunteer toasts and sentiments. A Washington dispatch to the New York Tribune says: Harry Sherman, one of Col. Baker's detectives, whom the rebels captured weeks ago, and were believed to have hung, is a prisoner in Castle Thunder. The Provost Marshal received a letter to-day, postmarked Richmond, containing this intelligence. A letter from Vicksburg says: In the grand assault of Friday a plan was adopted which I believe is somewhat novel, at least in America. Ten men were chosen from each regiment to the number of about 150, to head the charge as a sort of forlorn hope. They got to the ed
ly request the withdrawal of the order in question, and the disavowal thereof by those in power, as the only course which can be pursued to reassure our people that constitutional freedom, so dear to their hearts, has not ceased to be. The attention of the Governor is called to this infringement of popular rights and the invasion of the sovereignty of the State of Illinois. A Democratic Mass meeting in Indiana--the military on hand — Cannon bearing on the Speaker's stand — remarks of Mr. Veorrees. The Democracy of Indiana met at Indianapolis on the 21st of May. From fifty to seventy-five thousand persons were present. A regiment of infantry, in full marching order, was posted in the Governor's Circle, and two pieces of artillery were placed to sweep the streets leading to it. Hon. D. W. Voorhees made a speech. He said: "In the Constitution I read it is the inalienable right of the people peaceably to assemble and ask for a redress of grievances. No sadder grievances ev
Anna Cora Ritchie (search for this): article 12
hat make for peace by instantly proposing a cessation of hostilities. When asked what assurances he had from the South that propositions looking to peace would be received at Richmond favorably, he is said to have fallen back upon the general statement that the masses are tired of the war South as well as North, and would welcome the olive branch if their leaders would let them. Miscellaneous. The Confederates in Paris are wearing crape on their arms for Gen. Jackson. Mrs. Anna Cora Ritchie is residing in London. During the past two months there were received, aborted, and mailed at the Nashville post-office one million three hundred and thirty-three thousand two hundred and eighty-six letters. The 38th and 37th New York regiments had a reception there on their return home last week. The soldiers were given a big dinner, at which Judge McCunn addressed them, concluding as follows: Finally, I am for peace, with all its hallowed blessings, and I trust the
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