hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) 22 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 20 0 Browse Search
Banks 16 4 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 15 1 Browse Search
Richard H. Jackson 14 0 Browse Search
West Point (Virginia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Grant 12 2 Browse Search
J. Lucius Davis 11 1 Browse Search
James King 10 0 Browse Search
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 15, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 154 total hits in 58 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 12
ry lines of the United States, during the present war, and that I have not in my trunk nor on my person any papers or writings whatsoever, nor any contraband articles. No person will be allowed to take more than one trunk or package of female wearing apparel, weighing not over one hundred pounds, and subject to inspection; and if anything contraband be found in the trunk or on the person, the property will be forfeited and the pass revoked. Second.--A passenger boat will leave Annapolis, Md., on the 1st day of July next, to deliver those permitted to go South at City Point, and the baggage of each applicant must be delivered to the quartermaster on said boat, at least twenty-four hours previous to the day of departure for inspection. Third.--Children will be allowed to accompany their mothers and relatives, and take their usual wearing apparel; but the name and age of each child must be given in the application. Fourth.--Ladies and children desiring to come North w
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): article 12
Flanders, on behalf of the Committee on Invitations, read letters of regret for non-attendance from Hon Thomas H. Seymour of Connecticut, Hon. James A. Bayard of Delaware, and Hon. Willard Saulsbury of Delaware, all of which endorsed the peace movement, and elicited unusual approbation. The speech of Fernando Wood was the boldDelaware, all of which endorsed the peace movement, and elicited unusual approbation. The speech of Fernando Wood was the boldest and ablest of the occasion. Its tenor may be inferred from the following reasons which he assigned why the war should cease: 1. The war should cease because it should never have commenced, in as much as there is no coercive military power in the Federal Government as against the States, which are sovereign, and in pos a company of soldiers stacked arms at the point where that thorough fare debouches into Washington street. Another company stacked arms at the junction south of Delaware and Washington streets. It is needless to say no person was suffered to pass these points without especial permission. A section of a battery, with an infantry
Wyandotte (Kansas, United States) (search for this): article 12
the New York Freeman's Journal. He will be sent South. It was so certain in St. Louis last week that Vicksburg had fallen that several boats were placarded at the leaves "for Vicksburg and New Orleans." At a meeting of the New York Republican Central Committee, last week, resolutions in favor of protecting free speech and a free press were unanimously adopted. The Leavenworth (K. T.) Journal says that two "bushwhackers"--James Vaughan and Wm. Van Cheff — were arrested at Wyandot, Kansas, on Wednesday last. Vaughan was tried at once by military commission, and sentenced to be hung; and, in accordance with this sentence, he was executed at Kansas City on Thursday. He was a young man, about 23 years of age. On the scaffold he bore himself defiantly, proclaiming himself a "Southern man," and declaring that his friends would avenge his death. On stepping upon the platform he gave a last look upon the crowd, saying: "This is my last look; let her slide." In a moment more
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 12
d by a squadron of cavalry concealed by the buildings. The evacuation of West Point. The evacuation of West Point has something to do, perhaps, with the preseWest Point has something to do, perhaps, with the present pillaging raid of the Yankees up the Peninsula. Correspondence from Yorktown, of the 6th, shows that the force there consisted of the 4th Delaware, 169th New York; and the 169th and 179th Pennsylvania. What the force at West Point was is not ascertained, but it was certainly a division. A correspondent of the New York Tribune, writing from Yorktown on the 2d, says: Our forces are evacuating West Point, and are being brought here by transports; the last regiment leaves there to-day. West Point is a very important position to hold, and the troops while there had so effectually fortified the place as to make it almost impregnable; but the land ise it so unhealthy as to be unpatentable. I understand that the division from West Point now commanded by General Gordon (Gen. Ord having been assigned to some comman
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): article 12
tion, prolonged and nearly cheers for peace, groans for military courts martial of citizens, and cheers for the proposition for a Convention to take preliminary stops to secure peace. The greens and black for the President and the cheers for Vallandigham and peace were specially viscous. On motion of Mr. Flanders, the resolutions were adopted, after which Mr. Flanders, on behalf of the Committee on Invitations, read letters of regret for non-attendance from Hon Thomas H. Seymour of Connecticut, Hon. James A. Bayard of Delaware, and Hon. Willard Saulsbury of Delaware, all of which endorsed the peace movement, and elicited unusual approbation. The speech of Fernando Wood was the boldest and ablest of the occasion. Its tenor may be inferred from the following reasons which he assigned why the war should cease: 1. The war should cease because it should never have commenced, in as much as there is no coercive military power in the Federal Government as against the State
Point, and are being brought here by transports; the last regiment leaves there to-day. West Point is a very important position to hold, and the troops while there had so effectually fortified the place as to make it almost impregnable; but the land is very low and marany, lying as it does between two rivers, which, coupled with the excessively hot weather during the last month, made it so unhealthy as to be unpatentable. I understand that the division from West Point now commanded by General Gordon (Gen. Ord having been assigned to some command in the West) is to remain with the 4th army corps, under the command of Major-General Keyes, as the term of service of several of the nine months conscript regiments that are here will expire in July. The addition of so many troops gives quite a lively appearance to Yerkle we again, which has been very quiet the post and The are on a near the York river, just below the fort, where there is a salt-water brease constantly blowing from
y settle and determine in what manner and by what mode the contending sections shall be reconciled; and appealing to the Ruler of all for the nestitude of our intentions, we implore those in authority to listen to the voice of reason, of patriotism, and of justice. The reading of the address occupied about three-quarters of an hour, and was received with general favor. Among the sentiments of the audience elicited by the reading were groans and hisses for President Lincoln, Burnside and Butler, cheers for Vallandigham and McClellan, hisses for the Emancipation Proclamation, prolonged and nearly cheers for peace, groans for military courts martial of citizens, and cheers for the proposition for a Convention to take preliminary stops to secure peace. The greens and black for the President and the cheers for Vallandigham and peace were specially viscous. On motion of Mr. Flanders, the resolutions were adopted, after which Mr. Flanders, on behalf of the Committee on Invitations
C. F. Jones (search for this): article 12
each month, and at Cincinnati on the second Monday. The first sale will take place in the last named city on the 15th instant. The Newport News says that the Right Rev-Bishop of the Diocese of Rhode Island will visit the city of Washington in a few days for the purpose of uniting in the bonds of matrimony ex-Gov. Sprague, now U. S. Senator from Rhode Island, and Miss Kate Chase, eldest daughter of the Secretary of the Treasury. The chief of police of Nashville, Tenn., arrested C. F. Jones, formerly connected with the New York Spirit of the Times, now "local" of the Nashville Dispatch, for writing treasonable correspondence to the New York Freeman's Journal. He will be sent South. It was so certain in St. Louis last week that Vicksburg had fallen that several boats were placarded at the leaves "for Vicksburg and New Orleans." At a meeting of the New York Republican Central Committee, last week, resolutions in favor of protecting free speech and a free press were u
William Cheff (search for this): article 12
ting treasonable correspondence to the New York Freeman's Journal. He will be sent South. It was so certain in St. Louis last week that Vicksburg had fallen that several boats were placarded at the leaves "for Vicksburg and New Orleans." At a meeting of the New York Republican Central Committee, last week, resolutions in favor of protecting free speech and a free press were unanimously adopted. The Leavenworth (K. T.) Journal says that two "bushwhackers"--James Vaughan and Wm. Van Cheff — were arrested at Wyandot, Kansas, on Wednesday last. Vaughan was tried at once by military commission, and sentenced to be hung; and, in accordance with this sentence, he was executed at Kansas City on Thursday. He was a young man, about 23 years of age. On the scaffold he bore himself defiantly, proclaiming himself a "Southern man," and declaring that his friends would avenge his death. On stepping upon the platform he gave a last look upon the crowd, saying: "This is my last look;
James Vaughan (search for this): article 12
Orleans." At a meeting of the New York Republican Central Committee, last week, resolutions in favor of protecting free speech and a free press were unanimously adopted. The Leavenworth (K. T.) Journal says that two "bushwhackers"--James Vaughan and Wm. Van Cheff — were arrested at Wyandot, Kansas, on Wednesday last. Vaughan was tried at once by military commission, and sentenced to be hung; and, in accordance with this sentence, he was executed at Kansas City on Thursday. He was aVaughan was tried at once by military commission, and sentenced to be hung; and, in accordance with this sentence, he was executed at Kansas City on Thursday. He was a young man, about 23 years of age. On the scaffold he bore himself defiantly, proclaiming himself a "Southern man," and declaring that his friends would avenge his death. On stepping upon the platform he gave a last look upon the crowd, saying: "This is my last look; let her slide." In a moment more he was in eternity. Calomel and tartar emetic have been struck from the United States medical supply table by order of the Surgeon-General, on account of the abuse in their use by the Army Sur
1 2 3 4 5 6