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mall mistake in the date. --Dr. Francis Lieber, editor of the Encyclopedia Americana, in 14 volumes, and formerly Professor in the South Carolina College, stated at a late meeting of the New York Historical Society, to honor the memory of Mr. Pettigrew, of Charleston, that the Nullifiers in 1832 had prepared to massacre the Union men, and that as a signal to begin the work of death, one of the adherents of Gen. Hamilton knocked down Mr. Pettigrew, whose friends were ready to meet the issue.Mr. Pettigrew, whose friends were ready to meet the issue. The awful result was prevented by the presence of mind and forbearance of Mr. P., who quickly arose to his feet and declared that he had stumbled. But for this explanation and turn of the difficulty the battle would have been tolled in Charleston and the bloody drama would have opened. All these facts were related by Prof. Lieber as occurring within his own knowledge. Unfortunately for his reputation, a Columbia paper (the South Carolinian) asserts that Prof. L. was not in the State du
late meeting of the New York Historical Society, to honor the memory of Mr. Pettigrew, of Charleston, that the Nullifiers in 1832 had prepared to massacre the Union men, and that as a signal to begin the work of death, one of the adherents of Gen. Hamilton knocked down Mr. Pettigrew, whose friends were ready to meet the issue. The awful result was prevented by the presence of mind and forbearance of Mr. P., who quickly arose to his feet and declared that he had stumbled. But for this explanathis own knowledge. Unfortunately for his reputation, a Columbia paper (the South Carolinian) asserts that Prof. L. was not in the State during the nullification excitement, and did not remove there until 1835, when, through the influence of General Hamilton, he obtained a chair in the College. Dr. Lieber resided fourteen years in Columbia, and in 1849 voluntarily signed the State Rights Association, the object of which was to protect slavery from Federal encroachment. He is now a rank Abolitio
Francis Lieber (search for this): article 14
A small mistake in the date. --Dr. Francis Lieber, editor of the Encyclopedia Americana, in 14 volumes, and formerly Professor in the South Carolina College, stated at a late meeting of the New York Historical Society, to honor the memory of Mr. Pettigrew, of Charleston, that the Nullifiers in 1832 had prepared to massacre tanation and turn of the difficulty the battle would have been tolled in Charleston and the bloody drama would have opened. All these facts were related by Prof. Lieber as occurring within his own knowledge. Unfortunately for his reputation, a Columbia paper (the South Carolinian) asserts that Prof. L. was not in the State during the nullification excitement, and did not remove there until 1835, when, through the influence of General Hamilton, he obtained a chair in the College. Dr. Lieber resided fourteen years in Columbia, and in 1849 voluntarily signed the State Rights Association, the object of which was to protect slavery from Federal encroachmen
A small mistake in the date. --Dr. Francis Lieber, editor of the Encyclopedia Americana, in 14 volumes, and formerly Professor in the South Carolina College, stated at a late meeting of the New York Historical Society, to honor the memory of Mr. Pettigrew, of Charleston, that the Nullifiers in 1832 had prepared to massacre the Union men, and that as a signal to begin the work of death, one of the adherents of Gen. Hamilton knocked down Mr. Pettigrew, whose friends were ready to meet the issue. The awful result was prevented by the presence of mind and forbearance of Mr. P., who quickly arose to his feet and declared that he had stumbled. But for this explanation and turn of the difficulty the battle would have been tolled in Charleston and the bloody drama would have opened. All these facts were related by Prof. Lieber as occurring within his own knowledge. Unfortunately for his reputation, a Columbia paper (the South Carolinian) asserts that Prof. L. was not in the State
presence of mind and forbearance of Mr. P., who quickly arose to his feet and declared that he had stumbled. But for this explanation and turn of the difficulty the battle would have been tolled in Charleston and the bloody drama would have opened. All these facts were related by Prof. Lieber as occurring within his own knowledge. Unfortunately for his reputation, a Columbia paper (the South Carolinian) asserts that Prof. L. was not in the State during the nullification excitement, and did not remove there until 1835, when, through the influence of General Hamilton, he obtained a chair in the College. Dr. Lieber resided fourteen years in Columbia, and in 1849 voluntarily signed the State Rights Association, the object of which was to protect slavery from Federal encroachment. He is now a rank Abolitionist, though once a slaveholder. His gallant son perished in battle while defending the rights of the South. How different their characters in the estimation of all honest men!
presence of mind and forbearance of Mr. P., who quickly arose to his feet and declared that he had stumbled. But for this explanation and turn of the difficulty the battle would have been tolled in Charleston and the bloody drama would have opened. All these facts were related by Prof. Lieber as occurring within his own knowledge. Unfortunately for his reputation, a Columbia paper (the South Carolinian) asserts that Prof. L. was not in the State during the nullification excitement, and did not remove there until 1835, when, through the influence of General Hamilton, he obtained a chair in the College. Dr. Lieber resided fourteen years in Columbia, and in 1849 voluntarily signed the State Rights Association, the object of which was to protect slavery from Federal encroachment. He is now a rank Abolitionist, though once a slaveholder. His gallant son perished in battle while defending the rights of the South. How different their characters in the estimation of all honest men!