hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Gen Hooker 26 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 24 0 Browse Search
Joe Johnston 15 1 Browse Search
Lee 13 5 Browse Search
Thomas J. Jackson 11 1 Browse Search
Grant 11 1 Browse Search
Milliken's Bend (Louisiana, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Nassau River (Florida, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
Rosecrans 6 0 Browse Search
City Point (Virginia, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 16, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 12 total hits in 6 results.

Lucknow (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 18
To follow Jackson they knew was to march to certain victory; and, if it was necessary that success should be purchased at the cost of many lives, that reflection did not dispirit them; for the cause in which they were fighting stripped death of all its terrors. The London Herald, (Derby organ,) of the 27th, says: He was animated by the spirit which rendered the soldiers of the Commonwealth irresistible in fight — which carried Havelock through incredible dangers to the gates of Lucknow in triumph. The Christian and patriot soldier achieved the last and greatest of his successes in dying for his country. He perished doubly a martyr, and in his last breath attested the righteousness of the cause which he sealed with his blood. The Northern Republic has produced no heroes of the stamp of Jackson. One such man might be the salvation of them yet. Blatant demagogues at home, bragging imbeciles in the field, afford a spectacle so absurd, and yet so painful, that Europe know
en who, whilst their courage was exalted in an extraordinary degree by the conviction that nothing could be worse than defeat, were inspired with an unshaken faith in the genius and ability of their General. To follow Jackson they knew was to march to certain victory; and, if it was necessary that success should be purchased at the cost of many lives, that reflection did not dispirit them; for the cause in which they were fighting stripped death of all its terrors. The London Herald, (Derby organ,) of the 27th, says: He was animated by the spirit which rendered the soldiers of the Commonwealth irresistible in fight — which carried Havelock through incredible dangers to the gates of Lucknow in triumph. The Christian and patriot soldier achieved the last and greatest of his successes in dying for his country. He perished doubly a martyr, and in his last breath attested the righteousness of the cause which he sealed with his blood. The Northern Republic has produced no he
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): article 18
The Memory of Stonewall Jackson in England. The English press have numerous editorials on the death of Gen. Thos. J. Jackson. The London Post, (Government organ,) of May 26th, says: Jackson, like the Puritans, was austere and devout, but whilst his religion taught him humility and dependence upon his Creator, it did not lead him to confound the true nature of the objects for which both he and his followers were striving, and to suppose that because their ends were noble, that, therefore, they were the champions of God. If he was occasionally a preacher in the camp, he was also a skillful and gallant general in the field, and it is not surprising that those who had so frequently followed him to victory should have considered him as specially favored by Providence, and have regarded him with feelings akin to devotion. As a soldier he will hold probably the foremost place in the history of the great American civil war. His name is in delibly associated with the most brilli
Thomas J. Jackson (search for this): article 18
ewall Jackson in England. The English press have numerous editorials on the death of Gen. Thos. J. Jackson. The London Post, (Government organ,) of May 26th, says: Jackson, like the PuritaJackson, like the Puritans, was austere and devout, but whilst his religion taught him humility and dependence upon his Creator, it did not lead him to confound the true nature of the objects for which both he and his follosure the success of the operations they conduct. It was, however, the rare good fortune of General Jackson to lead men who, whilst their courage was exalted in an extraordinary degree by the convictat, were inspired with an unshaken faith in the genius and ability of their General. To follow Jackson they knew was to march to certain victory; and, if it was necessary that success should be purce which he sealed with his blood. The Northern Republic has produced no heroes of the stamp of Jackson. One such man might be the salvation of them yet. Blatant demagogues at home, bragging imbecil
n faith in the genius and ability of their General. To follow Jackson they knew was to march to certain victory; and, if it was necessary that success should be purchased at the cost of many lives, that reflection did not dispirit them; for the cause in which they were fighting stripped death of all its terrors. The London Herald, (Derby organ,) of the 27th, says: He was animated by the spirit which rendered the soldiers of the Commonwealth irresistible in fight — which carried Havelock through incredible dangers to the gates of Lucknow in triumph. The Christian and patriot soldier achieved the last and greatest of his successes in dying for his country. He perished doubly a martyr, and in his last breath attested the righteousness of the cause which he sealed with his blood. The Northern Republic has produced no heroes of the stamp of Jackson. One such man might be the salvation of them yet. Blatant demagogues at home, bragging imbeciles in the field, afford a specta
The Memory of Stonewall Jackson in England. The English press have numerous editorials on the death of Gen. Thos. J. Jackson. The London Post, (Government organ,) of May 26th, says: Jackson, like the Puritans, was austere and devout, but whilst his religion taught him humility and dependence upon his Creator, it did not lead him to confound the true nature of the objects for which both he and his followers were striving, and to suppose that because their ends were noble, that, therefore, they were the champions of God. If he was occasionally a preacher in the camp, he was also a skillful and gallant general in the field, and it is not surprising that those who had so frequently followed him to victory should have considered him as specially favored by Providence, and have regarded him with feelings akin to devotion. As a soldier he will hold probably the foremost place in the history of the great American civil war. His name is in delibly associated with the most brilli