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Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 14
be more submissive to than to the Lord of Heaven. The good father is a subject of France, and we are informed an authenticated statement of the savagery of the Puritan Yankees towards him is already on its way to France, or will be by the next steamer from this port. "Conservative." Seward will no doubt make ample compensation to the subject of France, and by taxes, and tariffs, and "licenses," or else by printing more greenbacks; gold will be procured to pay the damages of the subject of Napoleon III. But our correspondent and informant, whose character is a guarantee of the truthfulness of what he writes us, as a sincere Catholic horrified at what has taken place, and, as a believer in his religion, fearing further outrages, begs us, as his parting words on leaving New Orleans, to call the attention of Archbishops Hughes and Purcell to these and other fanatical assaults upon the Catholic religion at the South, suffered at the hands of New England soldiery. These prelates have
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): article 14
ng words on leaving New Orleans, to call the attention of Archbishops Hughes and Purcell to these and other fanatical assaults upon the Catholic religion at the South, suffered at the hands of New England soldiery. These prelates have shown themselves fast friends of Mr. Lincoln and of the Cabinet Secretaries who control him. Their brother Catholics at the South appeal to them to exert their influence for the observation of those laws of civilized warfare that were observed by our armies in Mexico under the Democratic Administration of Polk. They appeal to these Archbishops, and to all distinguished Catholics who are allied in this war with Lincoln's Administration, to prevent its becoming a war against the Catholic religion at the same time that it is a war against the States and people of the South! One of the outrages of this war. Rev. Dr. Stewart, Rector of St. Paul's Church, Alexandria, Va., left on the 10th inst. for Europe. Just previous to his leaving he wrote to t
Utica (New York, United States) (search for this): article 14
dictates of my condolence. Bad opening for the Union League-a mass meeting Beckon up. The Union Leagues in the North are coming to grief. A mass meeting, intended to be the opening of a series by the Union Leagues, was attempted in Utica, N. Y., a few days ago. The troubles of the day commenced by the infidelity of some of the Leaguers, among whom were John Van Buren, Brady, Daniel S. Dickinson, George Bancroft, and others, who entirely failed to appear and enlogize the "glorious old flag" as they had agreed to do. The League had paid the expenses of a large number of returned soldiers to Utica to join in the demonstration, but these heroes, it seems, played a very unfair game with their confiding employers. The Observer says: Early in the afternoon the soldiers began to "show their hand." The New York Zouaves procured a banner bearing a handsome portrait of McClellan, and with it they went from one stand to another, followed by the soldiers, and at each stand the p
United States (United States) (search for this): article 14
was kneeling at one end of the altar, and I was conducting the services at the other end, when a confidential agent of Secretary Seward, named Morton, arose in the front of the Chancel and demanded that I should pray for the President of the United States. At the same time a Captain of the 8th Illinois cavalry, named Farnsworth, began to repeat, from a front paw, the prayer for the President. Finding that I paid no regard to his demand, but proceeded in the Litany, Morton gave a sign to Farnthe voice of Lieut.--, saying "don't fire." I immediately arose, and facing the Captain (Farnsworth,) said something, in reply to which he said: "I arrest you, as a rebel and a traitor, in the name and by the authority of the President of the United States." I replied, "and I summon you to appear before the bar of the Lord of Lords and King of Kings, to answer upon the charge of interrupting His Ambassador, by armed violence, while in the act of presenting the petitions of His people, at His al
Jacksonville (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 14
The war. A Catholic trust Exiled and his Church closed a Church Sacked and the Benediction veil taken for a House cloth--French priest The Yankees, despising all religions, seem to have an intense hatred for the Roman Catholic faith and the priests and churches of that body of Christians. The sacking and burning of two Catholic churches in Jackson, Miss., and Jacksonville, Fla., has been published, and now we have from the New York Freeman's Journal a history of other outrages. The Irish and German Catholics who fill the ranks of the Federal army with their bodies, and the lists of killed and wounded with their names, would, we should think, be highly amused at these little evidences of playfulness on the part of their Yankee comrades. The Journal says: We have been pained to hear that the Rev. Father Parks, of Parkersburg, Va., was arrested, and his most private papers searched, by order of Gen. Scammon. Father Parks has protested that he was chargeable with nothing
France (France) (search for this): article 14
case may present a feature of peril for Lincoln's Administration that they will be more submissive to than to the Lord of Heaven. The good father is a subject of France, and we are informed an authenticated statement of the savagery of the Puritan Yankees towards him is already on its way to France, or will be by the next steamerFrance, or will be by the next steamer from this port. "Conservative." Seward will no doubt make ample compensation to the subject of France, and by taxes, and tariffs, and "licenses," or else by printing more greenbacks; gold will be procured to pay the damages of the subject of Napoleon III. But our correspondent and informant, whose character is a guarantee ofFrance, and by taxes, and tariffs, and "licenses," or else by printing more greenbacks; gold will be procured to pay the damages of the subject of Napoleon III. But our correspondent and informant, whose character is a guarantee of the truthfulness of what he writes us, as a sincere Catholic horrified at what has taken place, and, as a believer in his religion, fearing further outrages, begs us, as his parting words on leaving New Orleans, to call the attention of Archbishops Hughes and Purcell to these and other fanatical assaults upon the Catholic religio
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 14
he sacred ritual of the Church, and repeat unusual prayers prescribed by a military satrap — at least while he is denied communication with, and directions from, the Bishop. But a deeper cry of anguish reaches us from Louisiana. A gentleman of that city, a devoted Catholic, writing to bid us farewell on the eye of his quitting New Orleans, furnishes us with the following facts, which our correspondent assures us cannot be discredited: After the Hartford and Albatross had passed Port Hudson, the crew of the Hertford, Admiral Farragut's flag ship, landed at Pointe Coupee, some 25 miles above Baton Rouge. They commenced to plunder the place, and assaulted the Catholic Church. The church is in the midst of the old parish grave-yard. The monuments there erected to the memory of the dead were broken and defaced, and much wanton damage committed. Father Mittlebron's house was then visited — he being absent at another station. All that they thought of sufficient value was carr
Pointe Coupee (La.) (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 14
ary satrap — at least while he is denied communication with, and directions from, the Bishop. But a deeper cry of anguish reaches us from Louisiana. A gentleman of that city, a devoted Catholic, writing to bid us farewell on the eye of his quitting New Orleans, furnishes us with the following facts, which our correspondent assures us cannot be discredited: After the Hartford and Albatross had passed Port Hudson, the crew of the Hertford, Admiral Farragut's flag ship, landed at Pointe Coupee, some 25 miles above Baton Rouge. They commenced to plunder the place, and assaulted the Catholic Church. The church is in the midst of the old parish grave-yard. The monuments there erected to the memory of the dead were broken and defaced, and much wanton damage committed. Father Mittlebron's house was then visited — he being absent at another station. All that they thought of sufficient value was carried off, and the rest of his movables broken or destroyed. Next they broke into
St. Paul's church (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 14
influence for the observation of those laws of civilized warfare that were observed by our armies in Mexico under the Democratic Administration of Polk. They appeal to these Archbishops, and to all distinguished Catholics who are allied in this war with Lincoln's Administration, to prevent its becoming a war against the Catholic religion at the same time that it is a war against the States and people of the South! One of the outrages of this war. Rev. Dr. Stewart, Rector of St. Paul's Church, Alexandria, Va., left on the 10th inst. for Europe. Just previous to his leaving he wrote to the Rector of St. James's Church, Wilmington, N. C., a full account of the outrage perpetrated on him by the Federal soldiers while officiating in his pulpit in February, 1862. No account of this has been printed in the Confederacy, and we give the letter as a chapter which will pass into history as the narrative of one of the most sacrilegious outrages of this war: The services had pr
New England (United States) (search for this): article 14
y the damages of the subject of Napoleon III. But our correspondent and informant, whose character is a guarantee of the truthfulness of what he writes us, as a sincere Catholic horrified at what has taken place, and, as a believer in his religion, fearing further outrages, begs us, as his parting words on leaving New Orleans, to call the attention of Archbishops Hughes and Purcell to these and other fanatical assaults upon the Catholic religion at the South, suffered at the hands of New England soldiery. These prelates have shown themselves fast friends of Mr. Lincoln and of the Cabinet Secretaries who control him. Their brother Catholics at the South appeal to them to exert their influence for the observation of those laws of civilized warfare that were observed by our armies in Mexico under the Democratic Administration of Polk. They appeal to these Archbishops, and to all distinguished Catholics who are allied in this war with Lincoln's Administration, to prevent its becomi
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