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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 23, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 15 total hits in 7 results.

Middleburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
The cavalry fight in Loudoun We have a few additional particulars of the cavalry fight in Loudoun last week, and from these we learn that the affair was one of much more importance than was at first supposed. Our information represents that the enemy were driven out of Middleburg on Wednesday evening by the brigade of Gen. Robertson. On Thursday morning the fight was renewed, and at first the enemy were driven back, with the loss of some hundred prisoners, belonging to a Rhode Island cavalry regiment. In the afternoon the enemy was heavily reinforced, and throughout the remainder of the day the fighting is represented to have been quite severe, and altogether indecisive. On Friday morning heavy fighting was again commenced, and report states that the enemy opened upon our columns with artillery, inflicting considerable damage upon the brigade of Gen. W. H. F. Lee and another brigade. This, however, is mere rumor, and not wholly entitled to credit. This much we are confiden
Loudoun (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
The cavalry fight in Loudoun We have a few additional particulars of the cavalry fight in Loudoun last week, and from these we learn that the affair was one of much more importance than was at first supposed. Our information represents that the enemy were driven out of Middleburg on Wednesday evening by the brigade of Gen. Robertson. On Thursday morning the fight was renewed, and at first the enemy were driven back, with the loss of some hundred prisoners, belonging to a Rhode Island cLoudoun last week, and from these we learn that the affair was one of much more importance than was at first supposed. Our information represents that the enemy were driven out of Middleburg on Wednesday evening by the brigade of Gen. Robertson. On Thursday morning the fight was renewed, and at first the enemy were driven back, with the loss of some hundred prisoners, belonging to a Rhode Island cavalry regiment. In the afternoon the enemy was heavily reinforced, and throughout the remainder of the day the fighting is represented to have been quite severe, and altogether indecisive. On Friday morning heavy fighting was again commenced, and report states that the enemy opened upon our columns with artillery, inflicting considerable damage upon the brigade of Gen. W. H. F. Lee and another brigade. This, however, is mere rumor, and not wholly entitled to credit. This much we are confid
R. E. Lee (search for this): article 5
that had taken place; and we have a firm faith in the gallantry and ability of our cavalry to contend successfully with the forces under Stoneman. We understand that a dispatch was yesterday afternoon received at the War Department from Gen. R. E. Lee, stating that the forces under Gen. Stuart had been contending with the enemy's cavalry for several days with success. This is all that we were able to learn of the fight up to a late hour last night. If Gen. Lee telegraphs that our forces nderstand that a dispatch was yesterday afternoon received at the War Department from Gen. R. E. Lee, stating that the forces under Gen. Stuart had been contending with the enemy's cavalry for several days with success. This is all that we were able to learn of the fight up to a late hour last night. If Gen. Lee telegraphs that our forces have been successful, there is no doubt of the result, and we therefore conclude that the enemy have been repulsed, if not signally, at least successfully.
W. H. F. Lee (search for this): article 5
renewed, and at first the enemy were driven back, with the loss of some hundred prisoners, belonging to a Rhode Island cavalry regiment. In the afternoon the enemy was heavily reinforced, and throughout the remainder of the day the fighting is represented to have been quite severe, and altogether indecisive. On Friday morning heavy fighting was again commenced, and report states that the enemy opened upon our columns with artillery, inflicting considerable damage upon the brigade of Gen. W. H. F. Lee and another brigade. This, however, is mere rumor, and not wholly entitled to credit. This much we are confident of — that up to noon of Thursday we had a decided advantage in the series of fights that had taken place; and we have a firm faith in the gallantry and ability of our cavalry to contend successfully with the forces under Stoneman. We understand that a dispatch was yesterday afternoon received at the War Department from Gen. R. E. Lee, stating that the forces under Gen
again commenced, and report states that the enemy opened upon our columns with artillery, inflicting considerable damage upon the brigade of Gen. W. H. F. Lee and another brigade. This, however, is mere rumor, and not wholly entitled to credit. This much we are confident of — that up to noon of Thursday we had a decided advantage in the series of fights that had taken place; and we have a firm faith in the gallantry and ability of our cavalry to contend successfully with the forces under Stoneman. We understand that a dispatch was yesterday afternoon received at the War Department from Gen. R. E. Lee, stating that the forces under Gen. Stuart had been contending with the enemy's cavalry for several days with success. This is all that we were able to learn of the fight up to a late hour last night. If Gen. Lee telegraphs that our forces have been successful, there is no doubt of the result, and we therefore conclude that the enemy have been repulsed, if not signally, at least
, and report states that the enemy opened upon our columns with artillery, inflicting considerable damage upon the brigade of Gen. W. H. F. Lee and another brigade. This, however, is mere rumor, and not wholly entitled to credit. This much we are confident of — that up to noon of Thursday we had a decided advantage in the series of fights that had taken place; and we have a firm faith in the gallantry and ability of our cavalry to contend successfully with the forces under Stoneman. We understand that a dispatch was yesterday afternoon received at the War Department from Gen. R. E. Lee, stating that the forces under Gen. Stuart had been contending with the enemy's cavalry for several days with success. This is all that we were able to learn of the fight up to a late hour last night. If Gen. Lee telegraphs that our forces have been successful, there is no doubt of the result, and we therefore conclude that the enemy have been repulsed, if not signally, at least successfully.
Robertson (search for this): article 5
The cavalry fight in Loudoun We have a few additional particulars of the cavalry fight in Loudoun last week, and from these we learn that the affair was one of much more importance than was at first supposed. Our information represents that the enemy were driven out of Middleburg on Wednesday evening by the brigade of Gen. Robertson. On Thursday morning the fight was renewed, and at first the enemy were driven back, with the loss of some hundred prisoners, belonging to a Rhode Island cavalry regiment. In the afternoon the enemy was heavily reinforced, and throughout the remainder of the day the fighting is represented to have been quite severe, and altogether indecisive. On Friday morning heavy fighting was again commenced, and report states that the enemy opened upon our columns with artillery, inflicting considerable damage upon the brigade of Gen. W. H. F. Lee and another brigade. This, however, is mere rumor, and not wholly entitled to credit. This much we are confiden