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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 25, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Aldie (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 15
he reported fight between Longstreet's corps and the Federal near Leesburg. The passengers generally agreed that Lee's army had gotten so far North that it was a difficult matter to hear from it. From the cavalry fight between Middleburg and Aldie we have some further particulars. A man who was wounded in the engagement of Friday states that the series of engagements commenced Wednesday morning, and with occasional intermissions, continued until Friday evening. Up to the time of his leavi and a number of flag. One Yankee Colonel was killed, and a Lieutenant Colonel wounded and taken prisoner. Our own losses are said not to exceed one hundred killed, wounded and missing. The scene of the battles was on the road leading from Aldie, a village on the west of the Kittoclan Mountains, and the enemy's object is supposed to have been to ascertain the movement of our troops. Two aids of Gen. Hooker, with important documents, were captured. One of them with orders to Pleasan
Middleburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 15
From Gen. Lee's army. Passengers by the Central train last evening brought no news from Gen. Lee's army. There was neither confirmation nor correction of the reported fight between Longstreet's corps and the Federal near Leesburg. The passengers generally agreed that Lee's army had gotten so far North that it was a difficult matter to hear from it. From the cavalry fight between Middleburg and Aldie we have some further particulars. A man who was wounded in the engagement of Friday states that the series of engagements commenced Wednesday morning, and with occasional intermissions, continued until Friday evening. Up to the time of his leaving the field, late Friday evening, we had repulsed the enemy in every attempt to penetrate our lines with heavy loss, both in men and officers, and had captured about 400 prisoners and a number of flag. One Yankee Colonel was killed, and a Lieutenant Colonel wounded and taken prisoner. Our own losses are said not to exceed one hundred
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): article 15
o exceed one hundred killed, wounded and missing. The scene of the battles was on the road leading from Aldie, a village on the west of the Kittoclan Mountains, and the enemy's object is supposed to have been to ascertain the movement of our troops. Two aids of Gen. Hooker, with important documents, were captured. One of them with orders to Pleasanton to occupy and hold Snicker's Gap at all hazards. Our forces had anticipated this movement, and were already in possession of it. Many brilliant charges were made during the three days fighting, and some desperate hand to hand encounters came off. The great disparity between the casualties of the enemy and our own is attributed to the fact that the enemy relied altogether on the sabre, whereas our troops used both the sabre and pistol with citing effect. A gentleman who left Winchester Sunday morning states that the prisoners captured in these fights had arrived at that place, and were principally from Rhode Island.
ines with heavy loss, both in men and officers, and had captured about 400 prisoners and a number of flag. One Yankee Colonel was killed, and a Lieutenant Colonel wounded and taken prisoner. Our own losses are said not to exceed one hundred killed, wounded and missing. The scene of the battles was on the road leading from Aldie, a village on the west of the Kittoclan Mountains, and the enemy's object is supposed to have been to ascertain the movement of our troops. Two aids of Gen. Hooker, with important documents, were captured. One of them with orders to Pleasanton to occupy and hold Snicker's Gap at all hazards. Our forces had anticipated this movement, and were already in possession of it. Many brilliant charges were made during the three days fighting, and some desperate hand to hand encounters came off. The great disparity between the casualties of the enemy and our own is attributed to the fact that the enemy relied altogether on the sabre, whereas our troops
From Gen. Lee's army. Passengers by the Central train last evening brought no news from Gen. Lee's army. There was neither confirmation nor correction of the reported fight between Longstreet's corps and the Federal near Leesburg. The passengers generally agreed that Lee's army had gotten so far North that it was a difficuGen. Lee's army. There was neither confirmation nor correction of the reported fight between Longstreet's corps and the Federal near Leesburg. The passengers generally agreed that Lee's army had gotten so far North that it was a difficult matter to hear from it. From the cavalry fight between Middleburg and Aldie we have some further particulars. A man who was wounded in the engagement of Friday states that the series of engagements commenced Wednesday morning, and with occasional intermissions, continued until Friday evening. Up to the time of his leaving Lee's army had gotten so far North that it was a difficult matter to hear from it. From the cavalry fight between Middleburg and Aldie we have some further particulars. A man who was wounded in the engagement of Friday states that the series of engagements commenced Wednesday morning, and with occasional intermissions, continued until Friday evening. Up to the time of his leaving the field, late Friday evening, we had repulsed the enemy in every attempt to penetrate our lines with heavy loss, both in men and officers, and had captured about 400 prisoners and a number of flag. One Yankee Colonel was killed, and a Lieutenant Colonel wounded and taken prisoner. Our own losses are said not to exceed one hundr
Yankee Colonel (search for this): article 15
lry fight between Middleburg and Aldie we have some further particulars. A man who was wounded in the engagement of Friday states that the series of engagements commenced Wednesday morning, and with occasional intermissions, continued until Friday evening. Up to the time of his leaving the field, late Friday evening, we had repulsed the enemy in every attempt to penetrate our lines with heavy loss, both in men and officers, and had captured about 400 prisoners and a number of flag. One Yankee Colonel was killed, and a Lieutenant Colonel wounded and taken prisoner. Our own losses are said not to exceed one hundred killed, wounded and missing. The scene of the battles was on the road leading from Aldie, a village on the west of the Kittoclan Mountains, and the enemy's object is supposed to have been to ascertain the movement of our troops. Two aids of Gen. Hooker, with important documents, were captured. One of them with orders to Pleasanton to occupy and hold Snicker's Gap
Pleasanton (search for this): article 15
ers and a number of flag. One Yankee Colonel was killed, and a Lieutenant Colonel wounded and taken prisoner. Our own losses are said not to exceed one hundred killed, wounded and missing. The scene of the battles was on the road leading from Aldie, a village on the west of the Kittoclan Mountains, and the enemy's object is supposed to have been to ascertain the movement of our troops. Two aids of Gen. Hooker, with important documents, were captured. One of them with orders to Pleasanton to occupy and hold Snicker's Gap at all hazards. Our forces had anticipated this movement, and were already in possession of it. Many brilliant charges were made during the three days fighting, and some desperate hand to hand encounters came off. The great disparity between the casualties of the enemy and our own is attributed to the fact that the enemy relied altogether on the sabre, whereas our troops used both the sabre and pistol with citing effect. A gentleman who left Winc
Longstreet (search for this): article 15
From Gen. Lee's army. Passengers by the Central train last evening brought no news from Gen. Lee's army. There was neither confirmation nor correction of the reported fight between Longstreet's corps and the Federal near Leesburg. The passengers generally agreed that Lee's army had gotten so far North that it was a difficult matter to hear from it. From the cavalry fight between Middleburg and Aldie we have some further particulars. A man who was wounded in the engagement of Friday states that the series of engagements commenced Wednesday morning, and with occasional intermissions, continued until Friday evening. Up to the time of his leaving the field, late Friday evening, we had repulsed the enemy in every attempt to penetrate our lines with heavy loss, both in men and officers, and had captured about 400 prisoners and a number of flag. One Yankee Colonel was killed, and a Lieutenant Colonel wounded and taken prisoner. Our own losses are said not to exceed one hundred