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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 15
ernable pitch by the spectacle of their slaves in arms for their subjugation, burst from their entrenchments, and with savage cries of "no quarter for the niggers! the black flag is raised!" ran forward to the attack. In vain the black rascals fell upon their knees and begged for mercy; they were slain where they knelt, and out of a full regiment of nine hundred most valuable field hands, but two hundred survived to tell the tale. The deserters say that next day, Banks's "native Louisiana" regiments did not come forward at reveille, but the hill and plains from Port Hudson down for miles and miles below Baton Rouge were thronged with flying darkies, speechless with fright and evincing an unconquerable unwillingness to return to the scene of their first trial at arms. Another Confederate, who participated in the assault on Milliken's Bend, where the 11th Louisiana (negro) regiment was stationed, writes: In the fight yesterday, after we had completely routed the Yan
Milliken's Bend (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 15
nine hundred most valuable field hands, but two hundred survived to tell the tale. The deserters say that next day, Banks's "native Louisiana" regiments did not come forward at reveille, but the hill and plains from Port Hudson down for miles and miles below Baton Rouge were thronged with flying darkies, speechless with fright and evincing an unconquerable unwillingness to return to the scene of their first trial at arms. Another Confederate, who participated in the assault on Milliken's Bend, where the 11th Louisiana (negro) regiment was stationed, writes: In the fight yesterday, after we had completely routed the Yankees and they were in full recreate to their boats, our men in pursuit of them, encountered a negro regiment, who, seeing the defeat of the Yankees and afraid to fight themselves, immediately threw down their arms and ran toward our men for protection, a poor wretch was shot, others fled toward the river, pursued by our men, who got behind the levee and ou
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 15
rom their entrenchments, and with savage cries of "no quarter for the niggers! the black flag is raised!" ran forward to the attack. In vain the black rascals fell upon their knees and begged for mercy; they were slain where they knelt, and out of a full regiment of nine hundred most valuable field hands, but two hundred survived to tell the tale. The deserters say that next day, Banks's "native Louisiana" regiments did not come forward at reveille, but the hill and plains from Port Hudson down for miles and miles below Baton Rouge were thronged with flying darkies, speechless with fright and evincing an unconquerable unwillingness to return to the scene of their first trial at arms. Another Confederate, who participated in the assault on Milliken's Bend, where the 11th Louisiana (negro) regiment was stationed, writes: In the fight yesterday, after we had completely routed the Yankees and they were in full recreate to their boats, our men in pursuit of them, encou
xcited to an ungovernable pitch by the spectacle of their slaves in arms for their subjugation, burst from their entrenchments, and with savage cries of "no quarter for the niggers! the black flag is raised!" ran forward to the attack. In vain the black rascals fell upon their knees and begged for mercy; they were slain where they knelt, and out of a full regiment of nine hundred most valuable field hands, but two hundred survived to tell the tale. The deserters say that next day, Banks's "native Louisiana" regiments did not come forward at reveille, but the hill and plains from Port Hudson down for miles and miles below Baton Rouge were thronged with flying darkies, speechless with fright and evincing an unconquerable unwillingness to return to the scene of their first trial at arms. Another Confederate, who participated in the assault on Milliken's Bend, where the 11th Louisiana (negro) regiment was stationed, writes: In the fight yesterday, after we had complet