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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 30, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 2
Our army in Pennsylvania. The New York Herald, of the 26th inst, has been received in this city, and from it we learn that our advance was, at the latest dates, six miles beyond Carlisle, in the direction of Harrisburg. Now as Carlisle is eighteen miles from Harrisburg, our forces must be within twelve miles of that city, We may well imagine the terror of the Yankees, when we recollect how horror-stricken they The panic, indeed, so far from subsiding appears to be gathering strength withor even the Times, or in fact any other Northern journal that has tried its hand at prophesying. Some suppose that he means to attack Washington and Baltimore, some that his object is Philadelphia come that he merely means to make a raid into Pennsylvania, and return, and some again that be intends to carry on the war on the enemy's soil, and make it support itself. Where so many doctors disagree it were lolly in us to pretend to decide. We only know that he means to do something, but what it
Carlisle, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 2
Our army in Pennsylvania. The New York Herald, of the 26th inst, has been received in this city, and from it we learn that our advance was, at the latest dates, six miles beyond Carlisle, in the direction of Harrisburg. Now as Carlisle is eighteen miles from Harrisburg, our forces must be within twelve miles of that city, We may well imagine the terror of the Yankees, when we recollect how horror-stricken they The panic, indeed, so far from subsiding appears to be gathering strength with every day that our troops remain on the soil. Gen Lee has issued strict orders to "respect private property." We were greatly disappointed at this in the first instance, for we had hoped that the Yankees would be made to feel a portion, at least of the injuries they have wantonly inflicted on us. Nevertheless, we can imagine a very good apology for such an order. It is no doubt the object of the General to make war support war — that is to support his army in the enemy's country.--Should
Our army in Pennsylvania. The New York Herald, of the 26th inst, has been received in this city, and from it we learn that our advance was, at the latest dates, six miles beyond Carlisle, in the direction of Harrisburg. Now as Carlisle is eighteen miles from Harrisburg, our forces must be within twelve miles of that city, We may well imagine the terror of the Yankees, when we recollect how horror-stricken they The panic, indeed, so far from subsiding appears to be gathering strength with every day that our troops remain on the soil. Gen Lee has issued strict orders to "respect private property." We were greatly disappointed at this in the first instance, for we had hoped that the Yankees would be made to feel a portion, at least of the injuries they have wantonly inflicted on us. Nevertheless, we can imagine a very good apology for such an order. It is no doubt the object of the General to make war support war — that is to support his army in the enemy's country.--Should
ollect how horror-stricken they The panic, indeed, so far from subsiding appears to be gathering strength with every day that our troops remain on the soil. Gen Lee has issued strict orders to "respect private property." We were greatly disappointed at this in the first instance, for we had hoped that the Yankees would be mad to the discipline of an army as a habit of plundering. They soon to think of nothing else, become demoralized, and fall an easy prey to their enemies Doubtless Gen Lee had this fact, attested by all history, in view when he issued the order in question. He cannot afford to let the discipline of his army be relaxed, especially at this time, when he has a powerful army of the enemy to fight and that too in that enemy's own country. As for Gen Lee's intended movements, we are an unable to conjecture what they are as the New York Herald itself or even the Times, or in fact any other Northern journal that has tried its hand at prophesying. Some suppose